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determined2finish
03-06-2005, 06:31 AM
Hello wise writers,
I have more newbie questions for you all. I have done a lot of research for my book, which I have fortunately been able to download from the computer (articles, research, studies, reports, etc.) I have noticed a few sources state to contact them for reprinting permission. Does this mean if I want to print and pass out the article itself, or does it mean if I just want to quote some information from it (and cite it, too)? Do you need permission from the author/publication when you quote information from them (again, cited, of course) or does merely citing it allow it to be used?

Finally, do most of you do your research on the internet or do you physically go to a library for information? Many journals require you to buy articles, and I've seen them as much as $12.00 a piece - and who knows if it is even what you need until it is purchased!

All replies are appreciated. Thank you! :)

Medievalist
03-06-2005, 07:06 AM
I have noticed a few sources state to contact them for reprinting permission. Does this mean if I want to print and pass out the article itself, or does it mean if I just want to quote some information from it (and cite it, too)? Do you need permission from the author/publication when you quote information from them (again, cited, of course) or does merely citing it allow it to be used?

That depends, really. If it's just very short excerpts of prose, no more than a sentence or two at a time, you're probably ok. The thing to do is write the book, and footnote meticulously, then discuss with your editor/publisher. But do keep meticulous records.


Finally, do most of you do your research on the internet or do you physically go to a library for information? Many journals require you to buy articles, and I've seen them as much as $12.00 a piece - and who knows if it is even what you need until it is purchased!

In general, be cautious about using the web. You need to be very cautious in evaluating the accuracy and validity of web pages, as of course you would with any source, but the odds are higher that you'll have more false positives on the net.

That said, there are full text databases etc. of printed journals. But they are expensive, unless you have a relationship with a university that provides access to its community.

Use the public library, and keep in mind that most colleges/universities don't charge you for using their collections, just for taking items out. The photocopy card is your friend.

In recording your sources, include not only the complete publication data, but where you obtained the source, including a call number and the name of the library. Keep not only the full URL of web pages, but try to determine who wrote them, and record the date on which you printed the hardcopy of the page.

determined2finish
03-07-2005, 10:27 PM
Medievalist:

Thank you for such great info! The internet sites I used were for reputable national organizations or journals, but I know how misleading many of the websites are. Also, a lot of the research posted on line is very old and out of date. I agree, it is a good idea to keep very detailed records for research (which I guess can add up to a lot of disks once a project is completed).
Take care.

DeePower
03-14-2005, 08:58 PM
We have completed extensive research for all three of our books.

If the quote is just a statistical fact, such as "according to Bowkers 175,000 titles have been published in the last year," you just need to attribute the fact to the source.

If it's a table or chart of statistical information you usually have to get permission to use it.

If you're quoting a paragraph from a written source and it's less than say 200 words, usually all you need is to credit the source. But you have to be careful, it's always best to get permission to quote.

If you are interviewing a person and including even just a part of that interview, publishers require that you have a permission form signing and dated from the interviewee.

Most publishers will give you their specific requirements, including the permission form they want you to use, after you've signed the contract.

Dee

Medievalist
03-14-2005, 09:25 PM
Most publishers will give you their specific requirements, including the permission form they want you to use, after you've signed the contract.


This means you must keep fabulous records regarding where you found something, preferably a photocopy of the original book/article with all the publication data including page numbers. Be sure to also note where you obtained that copy if it's a library, including the library and the call number. If you want to use an image/chart/graphic, be sure to have two photocopies, one for you and one to send when you request permission.