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III
12-18-2007, 09:44 PM
Are the certain aspects of movies or certain filmmakers that you find overbearing?

For example, I'd like to see Sweeny Todd, but Tim Burton's vision is just so overbearing that it squashes the distinction of his different films.

I also found the scoring of Bruce Almighty to be oppressively overbearing - it was like every second of dialogue was accompanied by a manipulative second of scoring ... (this sentence is kind of serious ... oh but this sentence lightens the mood ... and this sentence is funny ... but this sentence is kind of serious again).

Shadow_Ferret
12-18-2007, 09:46 PM
There was music in Bruce Almighty?

kristie911
12-18-2007, 09:49 PM
I'm not a Tim Burton fan. I don't consider him overbearing, just over the top and it's just not my thing. I'm also not a Tarantino fan...at all. He's overbearing.

And in the horror catagory, I'm going to say Rob Zombie. I don't know about overbearing but definitely out there.

Shadow_Ferret
12-18-2007, 09:52 PM
I like Rob Zombie. I think Halloween is being released today. Must.rush.out.and.get.it.

kristie911
12-18-2007, 10:04 PM
I used to think Zombie was okay...then I watched House of 1000 Corpses. There's two hours of my life I'll never get back...not scary, just lame and confusing as hell. Hated. It. With. Passion. Now I can't bring myself to watch his stuff anymore.

DaddyCat
12-18-2007, 10:16 PM
M. Night Shyamalan is another one that tends to let the music overwhelm a scene. I can't watch an Oliver Stone movie without wondering when we're going to get that 360 degree pan around the character(s) during some dialog/sermon. Don't even get me started on Quentin "Let's all look at Uma Thurman's feet!" Tarantino.

ChunkyC
12-18-2007, 11:16 PM
I generally like M. Knight Shamaylan movies, but I know what you mean about him sometimes overdoing the music.

*small spoiler alert*

In Signs, for example, when the alien is shown for the first time on TV in that 'home video' ... could the musical crescendo leading up to its appearance have been any longer?

I too am not much of a Quentin Tarentino fan. In fact, I'm not a much of a fan of any movie that tries too hard to present violence as cool and chic. I think he struck a pretty good balance with Pulp Fiction because there was a lot of other interesting stuff in that film, but he often goes way too far with 'stylistic violence.'

KTC
12-18-2007, 11:22 PM
I don't often remain loyal to filmmakers...I just see a trailer and decide, 'Do I want to see this movie?' There are some filmmakers where the answer is almost always, 'YES!' (Anderson/Shamaylan come to mind) And then there are actors who seem to always play in movies that I know I will love; Johnny Depp, Robert Downey Jr...etc. But worrying about overbearing people and vision...no. I go case by case.

Shadow_Ferret
12-18-2007, 11:24 PM
I used to think Zombie was okay...then I watched House of 1000 Corpses. There's two hours of my life I'll never get back...not scary, just lame and confusing as hell. Hated. It. With. Passion. Now I can't bring myself to watch his stuff anymore.That one was so gruesome I couldn't watch it all the way through except with the commentary on. It was a crude first effort to say the least.

Devil's Rejects, the sequel, was better and actually made the same characters almost likeable.

I'm hoping he applied lessons learned to the first two when he made Halloween.

Anyway, in keeping with the theme, I find Tim Burton overbearing in that he has to just be so strange about everything. Quenten Tarentino, as noted above, just tries too hard to make violence chic. Michael Moore needs to stop bashing us over the head with his views. I get it. You're unhappy with the world as it is. Let's move on.

sunna
12-18-2007, 11:25 PM
M. Night Shyamalan is another one that tends to let the music overwhelm a scene.

Oh yeah. The heavy-handed musical cues in The Village made me so angry I left the theater, which I almost never do once I've paid my eight gajillion dollars to get in.

maestrowork
12-19-2007, 01:21 AM
I find M. Knight's direction overbearing -- the look at me, Hitchhock-esque cleverness and the deliberate pace to make you think... Ugh. He's probably one of the most self-important filmmakers today (next to James Cameron).

---

The whole movie: A Beautiful Mind is overbearing. I couldn't believe it won Best Picture. I mean, even the old-age made up was really bad, and it won Best Picture? It was one of the most manipulative Hollywood melodramas, slightly better than Crash.

kristie911
12-19-2007, 01:36 AM
Michael Moore needs to stop bashing us over the head with his views.

I'd rather someone bash him over the head and be done with it.

HeronW
12-19-2007, 01:39 AM
How about those Nick at Night comedies with all the laugh tracks? Jeez louise, ya think directors and producers from the 50ies and 60ies believe that their audience is a bunch of sticks who don't get the joke, lame as it is.

III
12-19-2007, 01:42 AM
How about those Nick at Night comedies with all the laugh tracks? Jeez louise, ya think directors and producers from the 50ies and 60ies believe that their audience is a bunck of sticks who don't get the joke, lame as it is.

Yes! But by far the most overbearing had to be the studio audience of Married With Children - a manditory 30 seconds of hooting and hollering after ever sentence. Everybody Loves Raymond is a close second. I swear that show has 4X as much audience laughter time as it does actual dialogue. It's just ponderous.

robeiae
12-19-2007, 06:36 PM
The whole movie: A Beautiful Mind is overbearing. I couldn't believe it won Best Picture. I mean, even the old-age made up was really bad, and it won Best Picture? It was one of the most manipulative Hollywood melodramas, slightly better than Crash.Nothing is only slightly better than Crash. Titanic is slightly worse, however.

robeiae
12-19-2007, 06:37 PM
Yes! But by far the most overbearing had to be the studio audience of Married With Children - a manditory 30 seconds of hooting and hollering after ever sentence. Everybody Loves Raymond is a close second. I swear that show has 4X as much audience laughter time as it does actual dialogue. It's just ponderous.
I think Full House was worse than both. Especially considering nothing in it was funny...but that didn't stop the laugh track.

Christine N.
12-19-2007, 09:44 PM
The only "film maker" I'm sort of loyal to is Jerry Bruckheimer. I can't remember him ever producing a bad movie, or one that I didn't at least enjoy.

And all the CSI's are his too, so I think he's just got the Golden Touch.

maestrowork
12-19-2007, 09:46 PM
Really? I thought Armageddon was unbearably annoying.

Christine N.
12-19-2007, 09:51 PM
Only Bruce Willis.

III
12-19-2007, 09:54 PM
Only Bruce Willis.

As the Gilbert Godfrey duck would say *AFFLECK*!

scarletpeaches
12-19-2007, 10:14 PM
And the damn Aerosmith track. And Liv Tyler. Anyone who's - uh, y'know - with Wack is deserving of my ire. Oh, and the cheesy ending.

But apart from that, it was fine. *cough*

Christine N.
12-19-2007, 10:45 PM
Yeah, but Steve Bushemi was awesome!

maestrowork
12-19-2007, 10:55 PM
Steve Buchemi was awesome in The Island, too, but the second half of that movie sucked so bad. Yup, another one of Jerry Bruckheimer's.

ChunkyC
12-19-2007, 11:06 PM
I really didn't like Armageddon either. The whole premise was off to begin with. I mean, come on -- why on earth would they train oil rig workers to be astronauts? Dontcha think it would be easier to train an astronaut to drill a hole in a rock? And don't get me going on how blowing up an asteroid inside the moon's orbit would not change a thing unless you used enough nukes to completely vaporize it, and even then all that material would probably end up orbiting the earth and blocking out the sun for decades, basically causing every ecosystem on the planet to collapse....

And I can't take the CSI shows anymore. The original CSI was intriguing, but now it's one gross-out after another, and lab technicians leading SWAT teams on raids ... stupid stupid stupid. I thought Quincy was bad for putting a coroner in situations a real coroner would never be in, but CSI has taken ridiculous to new heights.

But Steve Buscemi is awesome, every time he's on screen.

III
12-19-2007, 11:19 PM
Oh! Oh! What about Steve Buscemi in a new Quincy series!!! And upcoming young star Raymond Wong as Sam!!!

ChunkyC
12-19-2007, 11:37 PM
Oh! Oh! What about Steve Buscemi in a new Quincy series!!! And upcoming young star Raymond Wong as Sam!!!
Brilliant!

In the opening episode Steve/Quincy kicks the door to the drug lair open and saves the young girl from od-ing while Ray/Sam shoots it out with the dealers, finishing the last one off just as the cops arrive to take names.

maestrowork
12-20-2007, 12:01 AM
sam i am

III
12-20-2007, 12:03 AM
Brilliant!

In the opening episode Steve/Quincy kicks the door to the drug lair open and saves the young girl from od-ing while Ray/Sam shoots it out with the dealers, finishing the last one off just as the cops arrive to take names.

Okay, time to port this thread to the Scriptwriting forum before the NBC web bots steal these great ideas.

jst5150
12-20-2007, 12:17 AM
Okay, time to port this thread to the Scriptwriting forum before the NBC web bots steal these great ideas.
Like their human counterparts, the Web bots are picketing. :-)

As to overbearing, I liked De Palma's "Mission: Impossible" but thought almost everything else he did was unwatchable (Scarface is iconic, but not very good). Could say the same for any film not named "Goodfellas" by Marty Scorsese. Anything by Michael Bay is horrible.

On the other hand, always enjoy Kubrick's pacing. Kurosawa, of course. Phil Alden Robinson ("Sneakers") is pretty good, too.

jt

HeronW
12-26-2007, 05:56 PM
Eyes Wide Open is such a yawn and 2001 drags on an hour longer than necessary. Just because Hal speaks slowly is no reason for the whole movie to drag.

Nakhlasmoke
12-27-2007, 12:12 AM
Going back to Tim Burton, it's almost as if he has become a parody of himself. What was cool and quirky in Beetlejuice or Edward Scissorhands, now just feels like a film fan trying to emulate Burton. I couldn't finish Charlie And The Chocolate Factory because of that.

I also hate laughter in my comedies. Don't tell me when to laugh - if it's funny, it should stand on its own and not use canned laughter as a crutch.

Chasing the Horizon
12-27-2007, 06:45 AM
Yeah, laugh tracks are unbearably annoying. That's probably one of the main reasons I never watch sitcoms.

There's really no filmmaker or actor I can think of who's work I universally hate or love. Burton, Terantino, and Bruckheimer have made some of my favorite movies, but they’ve also all made movies you couldn’t pay me to watch. Same goes for my favorite actors and actresses.

kristie911
12-27-2007, 06:51 AM
Don't tell me when to laugh - if it's funny, it should stand on its own and not use canned laughter as a crutch.

s But what if I don't know what's funny? This way I know what's funny and what's not. 'Cuz, ya know, I wouldn't want to actually think or have my own opinion. s

Toothpaste
12-27-2007, 10:34 AM
Laugh tracks are actually an interesting thing. The whole fourth wall sitcom thing with an audience began with I Love Lucy when Lucille Ball decided she really could not perform comedy without an audience. It was a totally new innovation, and gave an immediacy to the humour. Of course since then I think the laugh track has more that outstayed its welcome. Although I wonder what it would be like if they actually just used the audience's response, and didn't try to augment it with canned laughter. Anyway, I just think it's kind of interesting that something that is so awful now was once upon a time something kind of artistic and new! But I suppose most things were at some point.

rhymegirl
12-27-2007, 11:14 PM
All I can think of is a song Jennifer Hudson was singing in Dreamgirls that just kept going on and on and on and I kept wanting it to just end.