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tfdswift
03-04-2005, 09:47 PM
Here's the thing...

You and your family are being evacuated to a very secluded place. It has plenty of fresh water and lots of wild flora and fauna and rich fertile land. You may only take twenty items with you to sustain you and your family for the rest of your lives. What would you take?

Keep in mind, that whatever you choose must be specific. Like you can say a 22- magnum rifle (that's one item) but for ammo you must say a specific number of shells - such as 50 (and that is another item.) The catch is you and your family must be able to carry these items to the destination in one trip, so you want to watch weight. But you can also get creative such as a 5-gallon bucket of various seeds would count as only one item, because it is one container filled with one item. Like the cases that shells come in, they are part of the shells. Just like a 50 pound barrel of beans is one item.

Each pot and each utensil counts as one item.

Now with all of this info-- what would you and yours take? And please tell me why you would take them?

~~Tammy

paprikapink
03-04-2005, 10:49 PM
Am I gonna have electricity when I get there?

-pkpk

ChunkyC
03-04-2005, 11:52 PM
I have over 100 DVD's and I ain't leavin' any of em behind! Do they count as one item?

Seriously, I'd have to think about this for about a month before I could come up with a reasonable answer.

paprikapink
03-05-2005, 12:10 AM
It is an interesting question. A woman in my RL writer's group is writing of her experinces as a Japanese-Canadian internee during WWII. They had to make a decision just like this one, and they didn't get much time --not more than a couple of weeks -- to think about it.

-pkpk

tfdswift
03-05-2005, 12:31 AM
No electricity, no modernconveniences of any kind. You don't even have a shack when you get there, so what kind of home are you going to provide and what will you need to take to provide it?

I am a patient person... take your time... This is going to be for the rest of your life. So Chunk, are the dvd's still important??? Just kidding. I really would appreciate anyones help.

~~Tammy

rtilryarms
03-05-2005, 03:32 AM
I'll just take my wife. It's her responsibility to support me in case of disasters or foreign occupation. It's a clause in the prenuptials.

OK, so that's.......one item.

SRHowen
03-05-2005, 03:45 AM
What about my Mother Earth survial in the wilderness books and my FoxFire books--are they one item or is each book seperate?

Shawn

reph
03-05-2005, 12:24 PM
A truck with lots of stuff in it – that's one item, right?

tfdswift
03-05-2005, 08:56 PM
Each book is one item.... No a truck is one item and each thing in it is one item.

I basically want to see what you think it will take for you to survive.

~~Tammy

Maryn
03-05-2005, 09:27 PM
Like everybody else, I'd have to think for some time on this.

But I know off the top that this is yet another place our kids aren't going to want to go with us!

Maryn

aka eraser
03-05-2005, 09:43 PM
Okay, I'm going to wing it here, without pre-planning.

1- Fishing outfit. The rod and reel are attached so it should count for one item.

2- Fishing bag. I joke in my book that I'd have a decent chance of surviving Armageddon if I have my fishing bag with me. I keep everything in there.

3- Leatherman tool.

4- A .222 rifle. Large enough calibre for medium-large game, small enough for small game.

5,6,7 & 8 - Four boxes of 50 bullets each.

9 - My Goretex parka.

10- A magnifying glass. For starting fires when the matches I have in my fishing bag run out.

11- A fillet knife.

12- A sizeable pot with a handle and lid.

13- Sleeping bag.

14- A large sheet of heavy-duty plastic, at least 20' X 20'.

15- An axe

16- One of those camping kits with a pot, frying pan, cup and utensils all packed into each other.

17- A plastic bag full of mixed vegetable seeds.

18- A How To Live Off The Land book, which would, of course, include how to recognize edible plants, herbs that could be used as medicines and other neat stuff.

19- A handcranked shortwave radio that can operate for up to an hour at a crank.

20- A tent w/fly.

I'm probably forgetting something important, but I'll take my chances with the above list.

MacAllister
03-05-2005, 10:19 PM
Hmm--I have no family, so I'm going to attempt to trim the list by ten items (I can carry a LOT...<g>)

1--cross-cut hand saw
2--1000 feet of lightweight, very strong rope
3--compound bow
4--quiver of 20 arrows for bow
5--my trusty gerber multi-tool
6--bottomless first aid kit, w/ antibiotics, anti-inflamatories, and antihistamines, and toothpaste
7--abovementioned 5-gallon bucket full of assorted veggie/grain seeds
8--the best sleeping bag I can buy
9--needles and LOTS of strong thread
10--Can I bring a horse? If so, that's #10...if not, then I want Frank's fishing bag.

the ten "luxury" items I would have made my family--had I one--carry:
11--the aforementioned camping kit, with utensils packed one inside each other
12--tent w/fly
13--solar-heated camping shower rig
14--shovel
15--Complete Works of Shakespeare
16--Complete Works of Twain
17--Complete Works of Dickens
18--Coleman stove
19--Rod and reel (I had originally planned to build fish-traps, ala Native Americans, Frank...this wasn't really an oversight)
20--a good axe, with a blunt side so it can double as a maul

maestrowork
03-05-2005, 10:25 PM
A genie in a lamp.

Does that count for one item or two?

ChunkyC
03-05-2005, 10:36 PM
I'll take Frank and Mac. That leaves me room for my entertainment centre and 17 DVD's. Does a box set count as one item? :D

aka eraser
03-05-2005, 10:52 PM
I like your list Mac. I kinda forgot about the cleanliness thing. We'd make a good survival team. :)

Chunk: :ROFL:

tfdswift
03-05-2005, 11:02 PM
Those were pretty neat lists... I am working on the perfect list for a project I am working on.

Chunk, Give up the dvd's - there is no electricity anyway.

Frank, if you only bring one mess kit, who gets to use it???

There is no such thing as a "bottomless" first aid kit, Mac.

You need to survive for the rest of your life, are you willing to give up things like beef, poultry, pork.... cheese, milk, and other conveniences. I am surprised there are no other animals listed than one horse.

~~Tammy

ChunkyC
03-05-2005, 11:10 PM
Okay: 15 DVD's, a portable generator and a full double-trailer tanker truck. You'll have to pry all five seasons of Babylon 5 from my cold, dead fingers ... which they'll probably be, after about four days. :idea:

MacAllister
03-06-2005, 12:48 AM
...are you willing to give up things like beef, poultry, pork.... cheese, milk, and other conveniences. I am surprised there are no other animals listed than one horse.

Hmm--good point. I think I was taking for granted that out of the abundant flora and fauna you'd mentioned--there would be some sort of goat-like animal that could be captured and at least semi-domesticated for milking/butchering.

The horse would be infinitely handy in terms of labor--also for capturing above-mentioned goat-like animals.

CC--don't forget to bring your guitar!

paprikapink
03-06-2005, 01:47 AM
I'm also thinking along the lines of a bag-pack loaded for a camping trip in the wilderness. That'd include a water-filtration-thingamajig. I didn't see that in a list yet.

Would dog and cat count as family members? Or items? (Say items and you're in big trouble!)

Cultjah-wise, I'm imagining it as if we're heading out to reinvent civilization from the ground up, so I wouldn't want to bring too many trappings of the one we've got now. Shakespeare, yes. Also I'd consider a copy of the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution worthy of being building blocks. Of course, I have them both in one book, so that's only one item.

This is fun. I didn't know I'd think that till you asked, Tammy.

-pkpk

ChunkyC
03-06-2005, 02:00 AM
All joking about DVD's aside, that's an interesting sidebar, pkpk. First order of business would be survival, but once you had that squared away, then what?

reph
03-06-2005, 03:20 AM
This is too hard. I can't do it. I wouldn't leave medical and dental care behind. I'd need a lifetime supply of thyroid pills, plus a blood test once in a while to review my dosage. Who knows what other medicine we'd need in the future, things not found in a first-aid kit? (My family is husband and me.)

I had a few ideas, though. Some have been mentioned.

--something mechanical (needs no fuel) for starting fires

--seeds of food plants
--plus seed for cotton or flax for when your clothes and linens wear out, but then you'll need a spinning wheel and a loom and knowledge of using them
--plus seed for calabash gourd (it makes containers)

--sewing kit

--(I wondered whether the native animals would be tame enough to milk and shear)

--fishnet

--shovel: as soon as you get there, you have to dig a latrine

--(how do you make paper and ink? paper is too heavy to carry)

--book about local edible and medicinal plants

--medical book

--cranked or solar-powered radio

--toothbrushes, floss

--salt

--nails

--knife (and grindstone? no, I assume there'll be rocks); scissors if possible

--device for signaling to airplanes "Get us out of here!"

JennaGlatzer
03-06-2005, 03:49 AM
This is crazy hard! OK, I'll try.

1. First aid kit, stuffed with Motrin and Lexipro

2. Bucket of seeds

3. Scissors

4. Giant sleeping bag

5. Tent

6. Cosmetic bag with toothbrush, brush, soap, tampons, deodorant crystal?

7. Water filtration device

8. Axe

9. Lighter

10. Lighter fluid

11. Large cooking pot

12. Male cow

13. Female cow

14. Male chicken

15. Female chicken

16. Fishing pole

17. Tackle kit

18. Fishing net

19. Bag of yarn and knitting needles

20. How to Survive in the Wilderness-type book

Kida Adelyne
03-06-2005, 04:30 AM
Hmmmm... good question.
Ok, the following list assumes I know how to USE the following items, have experience in growing crops, ect.

1. Army knife with everything possible.
2. Magnifying glass.
3. Sleeping bag
4. Male goat
5. Female Goat
6. Horse
7. Largest bag of food seeds I can fit on the horse
8. Bow
9. Quiver with 20 arrows
10. Survive in the wilderness book
11. Tent
12. Net
13. Longest, strongest hank of rope I can find.
14. Pregnant female rabbit (easy meal, prolific breeders)
15. Wooden flute
16. The Lord of the rings.
17. Cast iron pots
18. Roll of Chicken wire.
19. Sewing kit
20. Lots of linen bandages



oh, P.S.

--(how do you make paper and ink? paper is too heavy to carry) Paper can be made from wood shavings. Get shavings as small as possible, soak them, press them flat, and let dry. Don't know about ink, but charcoal works pretty well for writing (if your not left handed as I am:idea:I know. I shall reinvent civilization to write completly backwards! Then the right handed shall know my pain!:hooray:

MacAllister
03-06-2005, 05:28 AM
Oh! A pregnant rabbit! Brilliant, Ally!

maestrowork
03-06-2005, 05:39 AM
I was thinking a male and a female rabbits, but preggie bunny is even better (except if she has a miscarriage, then you have nothing).

See, I'm optimistic.

SRHowen
03-06-2005, 05:40 AM
Now wait--if I can bring a horse, can't said horse carry items?

What's funny is in one of my recent novels, an alt history, I have a modern man go back in time 2,000 years. He brings several horses with him--so he has to carry very little.

Seems if you allow the animals then you are getting rid of some of the idea as first posted--that you must carry in what you need.

So:

1.) Hand cart.

2.) The lovely 5 gallon bucket of food seeds. Bucket will come in handy later. to carry water, turn upside down and sit on, sit next to and use as a table and so on.

3.) Axe

4.) Sturdy knife

5.) Bow

6.) 25 arrows

7.) tipi

8.) Large tarp

9.) Swing grate (this is a cooking grate on a tripod)

10.) Survival in the wilderness book--hmm don't know which one right now.

11.) Sleeping bag

12.) flint and striker combo

13.) camping set of pots and pans, dishes and utensils. (they come all packed together in the biggest pot, so are one item.)

14.) plant identification book (for med plants and food plants)

15.) preg female dog

16.) male dog (just in case you don't get a male pup) (protection from wild animals, help catch food, and in a pinch--dinners up)

17.) my hide tanning kit--includes scrapers and such needed to process hides.

18.) EMT A kit.

19.) Salt (needed to preserve food, and hopefully will find a salt source in new location)

20.) bow saw

MacAllister
03-06-2005, 05:46 AM
see, I DID think about salt, but had "island" stuck in my mind--suggesting salt could be obtained from sea-water. I just went back and reread the original post, and she just tells us "secluded place"...

I'd be in trouble pretty shortly without salt.

reph
03-06-2005, 05:59 AM
How come Shawn gets 25 arrows? That's 5 more than Mac brought.

For fabric, I thought about knitting. The initial supply of yarn will run out, so you have to make more. That's why you need sheep or a cotton crop. You can make needles from bone or wood. I'd have to remember how to knit; it's been a long time.

I assumed the local fauna would include rabbits or something similar.

SRHowen
03-07-2005, 07:08 AM
Make clothes out of the hides of animals or woven grass stuffs. Tools, and such from bones, and well--I can go on if you like, but you can get everything you need from hunting--cept plants. If you want to know how to make it form an animal part--just ask.

I'd assume you could find a clay source to make dishes once the ones you bring wear out.

Hmm, was there a limit on arrows?

Shawn

MacAllister
03-07-2005, 07:11 AM
Shawn--nope, no limit on arrows, you were just smarter about it than I was...but I WAS told, in no uncertain terms, that there's "no such thing as a bottomless first-aid kit"...

SRHowen
03-07-2005, 04:38 PM
Shawn--nope, no limit on arrows, you were just smarter about it than I was...but I WAS told, in no uncertain terms, that there's "no such thing as a bottomless first-aid kit"...

Ok that was annoying, my computer just did something odd and I lost my post.

Let me see if I can remember what I said:

On some things you can have a bottomless "kit" there are some natural herbs that make a good antibiotic. Witch hazel, chuchupate, and milk thistle, made into a paste, or an infusion mixed with willow bark and boiled down to make a concentrate, minus the witch hazel for the drink. (hold nose to drink, tastes very very awful) But works very very well, include seeds in your seed pack for your medicine garden. Use just willow tree tea for pain and normal headaches.

Fleas and other insects interested in you or your food store: fire ashes, the fine gray stuff mixed with equal parts dried and crushed rosemary, thyme, pennyroyal, geranium and peppermint. For your skin, the same, but mixed with rendered animal fat. (Same as above, include seeds)

Broken bone, set and use sturdy sticks, use strips of green hide or very wet hide to wrap. These shrink when they dry and make a good tight cast.

Women, how many boxes of tampons do you plan on bringing? Forget it. Find a good source of moss--dry, store, use as needed and replenish. (umm, not as a tampon, but you get the idea. There are also a number of plants for PMS, and birth control--include seeds.)

Valerin root and kava kava to make a sleeping "pill." Combined with willow bark tea they make a good migraine medication.

And so on.

Soap, river bottom sand, the fine stuff--lemon grass, and if it can grow where you end up yucca root (makes suds) and again ashes. Boil herbs, mix with ashes, then mix with wet sand in amounts needed.

I’m afraid modern standards of clean would not last long.

Shawn

MacAllister
03-07-2005, 04:45 PM
This is off-topic, but it just occured to me that Shawn might know the answer to a question I've wondered about:

What did peeps do about hookworm in their kids, pre-modern-medicine?

three seven
03-07-2005, 05:34 PM
A cow has a nine-month gestation period and only has one or two calves at a time, so that's rubbish as a sustainable food source. And if you were going to go that route, you may as well take two horses. You've then got useful employees and juicy steaks. And I can't see that horse's milk could be any worse than cow's milk if you're drinking it neat, so to speak.

Of course, either of these options is going to involve a lengthy waiting period before you can have dinner.

Baby rabbits only take a month, but are very small and don't have a lot of meat on them so you'd need to breed a large family before you could adequately feed a family on them.

Can I rely on the local fauna including sheep? If so I'm laughing, since my family includes a sheepdog. I've therefore got a plentiful meat source that sustains itself and is easy to catch, and doesn't encroach on my 20-item limit.

biotales
03-07-2005, 05:39 PM
This is crazy hard! OK, I'll try.

1. First aid kit, stuffed with Motrin and Lexipro

2. Bucket of seeds

3. Scissors

4. Giant sleeping bag

5. Tent

6. Cosmetic bag with toothbrush, brush, soap, tampons, deodorant crystal?

7. Water filtration device

8. Axe

9. Lighter

10. Lighter fluid

11. Large cooking pot

12. Male cow

13. Female cow

14. Male chicken

15. Female chicken

16. Fishing pole

17. Tackle kit

18. Fishing net

19. Bag of yarn and knitting needles

20. How to Survive in the Wilderness-type book

Oh great Jenna, what are you thinking "Noahs wife".... Now there is an idea for a bio... the great flood as told by Ms Noah.... hummmmmmm

SRHowen
03-07-2005, 11:21 PM
How much detail do you need? Some of it depends on location of said peeps. Wormseed is the best, grows most places, is easy and pretty safe to use. I can give you the formula if you want. After dosing is given, needs to be followed up with a purgative of some sort, castor oil is a good one.

Shawn

reph
03-07-2005, 11:24 PM
Nobody's mentioned contraception although some people need it, which brings me to a question about the local flora: Are there rubber trees? If there are, you can extract sap, process it, and make all kinds of waterproof, stretchy things.

How about breadfruit? Starchy tubers? We might not have to sow a grain crop.

SRHowen
03-07-2005, 11:42 PM
Nobody's mentioned contraception although some people need it, which brings me to a question about the local flora: Are there rubber trees? If there are, you can extract sap, process it, and make all kinds of waterproof, stretchy things.

How about breadfruit? Starchy tubers? We might not have to sow a grain crop.

Ummm, yeah, I did.
Women, how many boxes of tampons do you plan on bringing? Forget it. Find a good source of moss--dry, store, use as needed and replenish. (umm, not as a tampon, but you get the idea. There are also a number of plants for PMS, and birth control--include seeds.)

I know which plants and the amounts and such, but most work by a.) perm sterilization, b.) preventing implantation or c.) (most effective and most common) inducing the "flow." Didn't want to open a can of worms reg abortion or what one is and so on, and many of those herbs can be dangerous if used wrong--deadly in fact.

Shawn

reph
03-08-2005, 12:23 AM
Sorry, Shawn, you're right, you did mention it. I think I mentally skipped over that part because I was distracted by thoughts about the moss – for example, that Indians used it as a sort of diaper liner for babies.

tfdswift
03-08-2005, 01:49 AM
If you bring a bag of things then each item is one thing. Like a cosmetic bag of toothpaste is one thing, but a cosmetic bag with a toobrush and toothpaste is two things. There may be goatlike creatures, there may not, I guess you can decide that. Any animal is one item.

~~Tammy

arrowqueen
03-08-2005, 02:51 AM
Anyone else found the luxury hotel on the other side of the island yet? They do great margaritas!

:D

aq

arrowqueen
03-08-2005, 02:51 AM
Sorry! Just couldn't resist it!

reph
03-08-2005, 06:44 AM
If we can decide what resources the place has, we can give it good stuff like a herd of tame sheep, prolifically laying wild hens, a stretch of coastline with clams and oysters, rubber trees, coconut palms, sugar maples, beehives for honey and wax, just about anything natural – and a location far from the Arctic.

I want a hot spring.

SRHowen
03-08-2005, 07:11 AM
salt flats, and a good source of obsidian and flint--those arrow heads aren't going to last forever, nor will other tools brought.

Willow trees, lodge pole pines--LOL

Not that all of this would go together. How about a breed of deer?

Shawn

reph
03-08-2005, 07:42 AM
Deer? Sure. I'll go for whitetail. Antlers can be carved into useful objects.

Piñon pines for nuts. Wild onions and garlic.

Galoot
03-08-2005, 08:29 AM
1 - Large tarp (better than a tent any day, and large because I can use what I need to sleep under and cut the rest off to live under. Plan for rain.)
2 - Sleeping quilt
3 - 500' parachute cord/lightweight rope
4 - 5" knife
4 - Spare 5" knife
6 - Large box of strike-anywhere matches (For convenience, but I'll be making as many fires as possible without matches)
7 - Water filter (You say fresh, I say bears sh** in the woods. Never trust the water, and assume someone will steal your boiling pot on the first day.)
8 - Collapsible water bottle
9 - 5-pound axe
10 - Hat with wide brim (And a dashing feather. Need to have a dashing feather. If that's two items, then I'll leave the water filter behind. I want my dashing feather.)
11 - Humongous spool of strong fishing line
12 - Package of fish hooks
13 - Sewing kit
14 - Alcohol stove (See #6 above. To be used only in a pinch.)
15 - Alcohol for stove
16 - File (For the axe. I plan on using it a lot that first year.)
17 - Cook pot and lid (2 items?)
18 - Spork
19 - First aid kit
20 - Backpack to carry it all

Do the clothes on my back count toward the total? If so, chuck #14 and #15 for a pair of good lightweight shoes and a parka. Hey, who needs pants?

My goal is to make it through the first year, during which time I'll be making more permanent items to replace the flimsy stuff I carried in.

reph
03-08-2005, 11:58 AM
Do the fauna include any big predators I need to worry about?

SRHowen
03-08-2005, 04:47 PM
wolves or big cats? Hmm, well I bet there would be. Wolves, drink lots of water and mark your territory. Avoid travel at night, keep kids in sight, and keep dogs.

Big cats rarely bother you in your camp, unless you keep tame sheep or such they may want. Even then they don't very often. Out on the trail---if you encounter one, don't get between it and its kittens, and stand very very still. Become stone. Cats like to chase things no matter how big. Smaller wild cats, steal a kitten or two, hand raise. They will claim your area as theirs, so no others will bother you. LOL (Shawn, who lives with 7 cats, 3 non-domestic sorts)

Bears on the other hand will rip a camp to shredds and you--thus the dogs. Warning and help. Make sure all food stuffs are a distance away from you and yours and rig up a pully system and platform and keep food high off the ground. And never ever bring it inside your "tent."

Shawn

Cabria
03-08-2005, 05:28 PM
1. Nachos
2. Cheese
3. Cheese Grater
5. Knife
6. Avacados
7. Sour cream
8. Garlic, S & P
9. Lemon Juice
10. Salsa
11. Jalapeno peppers
12. Fork
13. Plate or tray
14. Swimsuit
15. Hat
16. Sun block
17. My drums
18. Limes
19. Bottle opener
20. And last, but not least, Coronas!

Items 6-9 are for making the guacamole.
The sun would bake the nachos.
And then I'd have a party!

p.s. I'd really have to leave my family at home.....this is a holiday for me!!

Debbie :snoopy:

Kida Adelyne
03-11-2005, 01:39 AM
Baby rabbits only take a month, but are very small and don't have a lot of meat on them so you'd need to breed a large family before you could adequately feed a family on them.


The rabbits are for in a pinch. I would allow them to get into several generations before cosidering them a primary meal source.


Maybe later I'll revise my list. Origional list doesn't really plan for the future.

reph
03-11-2005, 03:47 AM
Sunscreen? Anybody mention sunscreen?

maestrowork
03-11-2005, 03:59 AM
1. Halle Barry
2. Charlize Theron
3. Salma Hayek
4. 10 cases of tequila
5. ....

Galoot
03-11-2005, 04:17 AM
Sunscreen? Anybody mention sunscreen?I gave up binoculars for a wide-brimmed hat. That's close enough.

MacAllister
03-11-2005, 04:36 AM
I had sunscreen in my (peremptorily disqualified) bottomless first-aid kit.

SRHowen
03-12-2005, 03:02 AM
Herbal sunscreen--oh never mind.

Shawn

tfdswift
03-12-2005, 04:00 AM
My hubby and I know how to live completely off the land. We did it for four years back 13-14 years ago. I just was wondering what most people think they need to start with to take on such an endeavor. All of this info is very interesting to me and helpful in a side project I am working on.

~~Tammy

Galoot
03-12-2005, 04:12 AM
I'd much rather the limitation was "twenty pounds" rather than "twenty items." I'll bet you all care, too. http://absolutewrite.com/forums/images/icons/icon10.gif

SRHowen
03-12-2005, 05:55 AM
LOL Well, I also have lived off the land. The 20 items is a bit trying as in --ok you can't take a camp kit with you (dishes and such), or it would not allow my animal processing stuff as each item would count as one thing.

What would you take with you? (or what did you have?)

Shawn

tfdswift
03-14-2005, 10:47 PM
This is the first draft of my list - but I may still change some things...

Bow - I'm not sure about this one. I know how to make one. I will make the
arrows.
Survival knife
cross cut saw
5 gallon bucket of various seefds
5 gallon bucket of seed potatoes
Rooster
Hen
Pregnant cow
Bull
Pregnant horse
stallion
Pregnant pig
Boar
covered wagon
500 feet of nylon rope
canteen
sewing kit
lg cast iron pot
wilderness survival book
lg cast iron skillet

~~Tammy

paprikapink
03-14-2005, 11:21 PM
I'm reading the Laura Ingalls Wilder "little house" series again with my second daughter. We're right at the point where they loaded up the truck and they moved to Beverly, Hills that is. No, I mean South Dakota, and it's a wagon, not a truck. Anyway, it's along the lines of this thread. No one toeld them they could only bring 20 items, but they only brought what fit in the covered wagon. They didn't bring nails, for instance, because Pa could make "nails" from wood. But they must have had a shovel with them because one of the first things they do at a new homesite is dig a well (bet he dug a potty too, but Laura is too genteel to mention that).

This book is the really tragic one where the white settlers move in and the local natives spend days debating whether to kill them or move.

Meanwhile, did I miss the answer to my question -- do the dog and cat count as family members?

-pkpk

reph
03-14-2005, 11:47 PM
Tammy, what are you going to do when you need to mend garments or make new ones?

SRHowen
03-14-2005, 11:56 PM
We did this with the Boy Scouts one summer. We built a wood box the size of the typical wagon they used to go out west. Then told them they could only bring what fit in the wagon or could be attached to it. (We put it up on blocks the same height as wheels would have held it--cattle could be tied to it, or pull it. No bulls. Have you ever tried to handle a bull? Or a stallion for that matter?

We divided them into groups and they had to fit it all in. We had boxes (with labels on them, like seeds and so on, and pots and pans, and toys and all sorts of things--many needed, many not.

One group managed to fit it all in or on the wagon. Others didn't.

Makes more sense that you would be given a weight or size allotment rather than an item count. Such as the wagon or the hand cart (many settlers went out west with a hand cart)--than what you can carry.

tfdswift
03-16-2005, 01:12 AM
Yep handled a bull and a stallion I lived on a totally self-sufficient farm, with the exception of electric (we paid the local company). Hubby did also have a job away from the farm. What we didn't have we bartered for with local people. I shopped maybe once every six months and that was for luxuries like chocolate and spices that I did not have growing in my herb garden.

I actually think it would be harder to guide the pigs.

You can also barter in this instance, you just don't know what other people would take.
Someone mentioned mending... I would use strips of leather or sinew. You can make needles from bone.

Plates and dishes would be the absolute least of my worries in this situation.

~~Tammy

tfdswift
03-22-2005, 01:11 AM
I think I will switch the bow for a flint. Just because building a fire with a bow and drill is extremely hard.

~~Tammy

Rob-rite
03-23-2005, 07:07 PM
A large supply of class A drugs. You wouldn't survive for long but you'd be like: "Who gives a #~**." :)

SRHowen
03-23-2005, 10:33 PM
yes, the flint is much better. Unless you have a good supply of dryer lint. LOL It catches pretty fast.

Shawn