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III
12-14-2007, 11:09 PM
I'm planning on taking my son and some of his little cronies to see I Am Legend this weekend. They're 8 years old and they watch movies like LOTR, so I'm thinking they should be able to handle it. Has anyone seen it yet?

Shadow_Ferret
12-14-2007, 11:22 PM
Wow. You'd take your 8-year-old to that?

My 7-year-old doesn't like anything even remotely scary. He still can't watch the Incredibles without getting worried.

III
12-14-2007, 11:30 PM
I was really hesitant about letting him watch scary things, like LOTR and Harry Potter, but all my kids love them. They've never seen an actual horor movie, but they love action/adventure and the monsters don't seem to bother them. When I was seven, Darth Vader terrified me!

Toothpaste
12-14-2007, 11:57 PM
From what I understand the monsters in I Am Legend are so poorly rendered they wouldn't scare a fly (flies being notoriously skittish). The movie has been getting reviews that almost universally state the first two thirds are great, the last third utterly ruins the film.

Pity.

Fortunately Will Smith is one of the most charming and charismatic actors around, and evidently doesn't disappoint. And the dog looks wonderful.

Shadow_Ferret
12-15-2007, 12:02 AM
When I was seven, Darth Vader terrified me!
I had nightmares for years after seeing The Twilight Zone episode with the Zanti Misfits.

In fact, these things still give me the creeps.

http://trashotron.com/agony/images/2007/07-news/06-18-07/zanti_misfits.jpg

III
12-15-2007, 12:04 AM
The old Twilight Zone TV show used to scare pants off of me when I was a kid. It didn't even matter which episode, just the grainy black & white was enough to send me running.

DaddyCat
12-15-2007, 12:32 AM
At the risk of being pedantic, "The Zanti Misfits" episode is from The Outer Limits, not The Twilight Zone. People mix them up all the time.

rugcat
12-15-2007, 12:33 AM
When I was seven, Darth Vader terrified me!Seven? I feel so very old.

III
12-15-2007, 12:37 AM
Seven? I feel so very old.

Then you might want to stay away from this thread (http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=86351).

Shadow_Ferret
12-15-2007, 12:38 AM
At the risk of being pedantic, "The Zanti Misfits" episode is from The Outer Limits, not The Twilight Zone. People mix them up all the time.

Thank you, Mr. Pedantic. :tongue

Not sure why I said Twilight Zone.

BarbaraKE
12-16-2007, 12:50 AM
I plan on seeing it this week sometime. My older son (18) said it was one of the few films he actually found scary. He actually used the word 'terrified' (which shocked me). So I don't know if I'd take an 8-year-old to see it. Might want to see it yourself first and then decide.

maestrowork
12-16-2007, 01:00 AM
Wow. You'd take your 8-year-old to that?

My 7-year-old doesn't like anything even remotely scary. He still can't watch the Incredibles without getting worried.

When I was 8, my parents took me to see JAWS. Hey, if I could survive that without any permanent mental damage (heh heh heh... if you don't agree with me I'll CUT you!!!)...

I plan to see and review it this weekend. I don't really like end-of-the-world-zombie stuff but hey, 28 Days Later wasn't bad (28 Weeks later, however, was the stupidest movie).

Perks
12-16-2007, 01:04 AM
My kids have beem clamoring to see a horror film. They are nine and five. They love 'Harry Potter' and that sort of thing, but they want a properly scary film. I'm all for it, because I've loved thrills and chills since I was two, but I'm having a hard time deciding.

I don't much care about bad language. I just want to avoid wholesale realistic murder, naked people and psychologically scary stuff.

I think Poltergeist would be great, except that a) it's too scary and b) it's too good. If that's your first horror film, the bar's set a bit high and you'll be doomed to a life of cinematic disappointment.

Someone recently suggested Gremlins and I think this might be the perfect solution.

I'm sorry to hear that I Am Legend isn't being well received. I'll probably see it anyway.

maestrowork
12-16-2007, 01:08 AM
I think Gremlins would be a good "scary movie" for the younguns.

Or just show them JAWS, then take them to the beach afterwards.

Bwhahahahaha.

dpaterso
12-16-2007, 01:10 AM
Scare-wise, Legend is technically Paranoia SF, cue feelings of acute isolation and, well, paranoia... nightmare fodder for kids.

This aside, I'm thinking the film may not be suitable for 8-year-old attention spans, I read an early version of the screenplay and man, the first half dragged. The second half didn't exactly go to flank speed either.

Will Smith makes all the difference, of course.

-Derek

Perks
12-16-2007, 01:12 AM
Or just show them JAWS, then take them to the beach afterwards.

The nine year old has already suggested Jaws over her father's objections.

He said, "If she watches that, she'll never get in the water."

To which the girl replied, "Duh. I was never getting in the water anyway."

nevada
12-16-2007, 01:20 AM
I want to see I Am Legend and my 8 yr old nephew hasnt said anything about it. He loves horror movies. Freddie Krueger, Halloween, he's all for it. He totally understands that it's all fake. When he was five or so and saw LOTR for the first time he turned to his mom and said, "Don't be afraid, it's just a guy in a suit." Kissing, however, horrifies him and he won't watch it. And yet, he was the only boy to dance with a girl in the christmas concert. It depends on the kid what you'll let him see. I think my 15 yr old nephew is still scared when he sees LOTR, the 8 yr old thinks it's all old hat.

I think if you're going to let a kid see a scary movie for the first time, it should be a situation teh child wouldn't find himself in so he's not going to be worried in his real life that somethign scary will happen. So no monsters from teh closet or under the bed. But Jaws? Or Aliens in space? Totally safe.

maestrowork
12-16-2007, 01:21 AM
Tell you 9yo she may not even want to take a shower!

Now, how about letting them see Arachnophobia? :D Spiders don't come out of your shower drain, you know....

kuwisdelu
12-16-2007, 01:32 AM
I thought I Am Legend was great. I don't know how scary the actual monsters would be to a child. I didn't think they were badly-rendered at all, but I haven't seen too many horror movies lately. It's not really a "horror" movie, but it *is* a terrifying movie. For me, the terror mostly came from the idea that this is something that could really happen today. I thought it was great, and for me it didn't drag at all, nor did the last third ruin anything. If you're going into it thinking you're going to see a mindless bloody, gory horror film, then you'll be very disappointed. A lot of the greatness and horror is psychological.

ChunkyC
12-16-2007, 02:37 AM
I saw it last night and will be giving it a decent review. I think it might be a bit much for an 8 year old. Heck, I make part of my living writing about movies and have seen just about every kind of film Hollywood can throw at us, and I was startled and creeped out repeatedly.

'course, I'm a wimp. :D

jordijoy
12-16-2007, 03:07 AM
I thought I Am Legend was great. I don't know how scary the actual monsters would be to a child. I didn't think they were badly-rendered at all, but I haven't seen too many horror movies lately. It's not really a "horror" movie, but it *is* a terrifying movie. For me, the terror mostly came from the idea that this is something that could really happen today. I thought it was great, and for me it didn't drag at all, nor did the last third ruin anything. If you're going into it thinking you're going to see a mindless bloody, gory horror film, then you'll be very disappointed. A lot of the greatness and horror is psychological.

Psychological horror is the best kind! I can't wait to see it!

III
12-16-2007, 05:55 AM
Tomorrow's the big day. And since it's the horror of Legend for the boys or the horror of Alvin and the Chipmunks for me, guess which one we're seeing . . .

Straka
12-16-2007, 06:09 AM
I want to see I Am Legend, but if you want to see something really scary, make them watch the earlier film based on the book:

http://www.scifimoviepage.com/front/omega-poster.jpg

:-P

Shadow_Ferret
12-16-2007, 06:10 AM
When I was 8, my parents took me to see JAWS. Hey, if I could survive that without any permanent mental damage (heh heh heh... if you don't agree with me I'll CUT you!!!)...

Really? At 8? I saw it at 18 when I saw it and its traumatized me for life. I panic if I'm in a lake and something brushes my leg.


Tomorrow's the big day. And since it's the horror of Legend for the boys or the horror of Alvin and the Chipmunks for me, guess which one we're seeing . . .
My 7-year-old just saw Alvin and loved it. And I've seen the commercials and it seems cute.

Chasing the Horizon
12-16-2007, 09:25 AM
I'm going to go see I Am Legend sometime this week (wanted to go over the weekend but the weather decided to be crappy). I love psychological horror (and every other type of horror) and I love Will Smith, so I think I'll like it. If it's too scary for an 8-year-old it might be too much for my Dad, though, lol.

I saw Jaws when I was about 8 too. My parents had gone on and on about how scary it was (it had been out for probably a decade by then), and I just found it boring. I mean, it was just a shark. *shrug* Of course, I'd been watching the X-files since the show premiered (when I was 6). Some of the early episodes of that show still scare me.

maestrowork
12-16-2007, 09:29 AM
The nine year old has already suggested Jaws over her father's objections.

He said, "If she watches that, she'll never get in the water."

To which the girl replied, "Duh. I was never getting in the water anyway."

Show them Deep Blue Sea. Scary and funny at the same time.

maxmordon
12-16-2007, 10:39 AM
I saw The Silence of the Lambs (TV Edited) with my mom when I was 8...

...Naked Lunch on the cable when I was 11 and the whole Evengelion series when I was 12...

And I ended up sorta normal*



*Being a freaking weirdo actually

Bartholomew
12-16-2007, 12:23 PM
I'm planning on taking my son and some of his little cronies to see I Am Legend this weekend. They're 8 years old and they watch movies like LOTR, so I'm thinking they should be able to handle it. Has anyone seen it yet?

I'm going to see it tomorrow.

I adored the book; I hope they do it justice on film.

Jcomp
12-16-2007, 07:58 PM
Seen it. I don't think it's too heavy at all for an 8-year-old that's already seen LOTR.

It's a very different take on the book, as was Omega Man, but I still enjoyed it. Then again, I think Will Smith is that dude, so I may be a tad biased. Plus I was still buzzing through the whole film from seeing the advanced clip of The Dark Knight attached to Imax screenings of Legend. In fact, I'm STILL gloriously intoxicated off of that, so I might not have been watching with the most discerning eye.

Straka
12-17-2007, 02:03 AM
I am Legend apparently has the best Dec opening ever, it made $76.5 million this weekend

jordijoy
12-17-2007, 04:27 AM
I am Legend apparently has the best Dec opening ever, it made $76.5 million this weekend
I just read that on line. I hate I didn't get to see it this weekend. Hopefully I can get a chance at some point during the week...

maestrowork
12-17-2007, 06:49 AM
It's good but not great. The last 30 minutes is rather silly/Hollywood. Could have been better. But Will Smith is good.

Don Allen
12-17-2007, 08:28 AM
I saw it last night and will be giving it a decent review. I think it might be a bit much for an 8 year old. Heck, I make part of my living writing about movies and have seen just about every kind of film Hollywood can throw at us, and I was startled and creeped out repeatedly.

'course, I'm a wimp. :D

I seen it tonight and quite frankly left with one of those "My gosh this could have been such a great flick" feelings. I really wish it would have explained the situation a little better in the beginning because I really wanted to get into the causation aspect of the plot. Instead I felt like they went from "Omega Man" into the "Night of the living dead" with cheesy effects, and a return to mind numbing attacks of monsters in lieu of a bone chilling scenario that should have scared the pants off the audience... It was O.K ,, not horrible, but certainly a movie that dosen't pay off after a nice build up....

Bartholomew
12-17-2007, 04:33 PM
Will Smith did a very good job of portraying Neville as a character, IMO. I had my fears that he would play the part as Will Smith and not Neville, but he actually came through and did some acting. I was impressed.

But SHAME on the script writers for taking the story, altering it SO dramatically, and then having the audacity to call it by the same name.

The title, of course, makes zero sense the way they ended he movie.

He is Legend because, at the end of the book, he discovers that he has become a human dracula, not because he saved mankind.

The entire back end of the film seemed like someone had read the book, got VERY depressed, ripped the book in half, and then created a happy ending.

Many things do not make sense unless you have read the book: for instance, the infected people setting a trap for Neville. In the context of the book, that makes perfect sense, because the infected humans were still human--it was just the ones outside his house at night that were uncontrollable monsters.

But the way the movie has it, the creatures are all 100% degenerate. Where does the trap scene fit into that?

Also, I wonder what they cut. There was obviously some kind of buildup indicating that the main Baddy (the one we keep seeing throughout the film) had come to Neville's lab to "rescue" the woman. They build that up, but never follow through. I have a feeling this was done on purpose to get people to buy the stupid DVD. If that is the case, I'll probably stop watching movies altogether. If it was just the result of a mad dash to publication---well, I'm a bit more sympathetic to that.

NikeeGoddess
12-17-2007, 05:27 PM
Now, how about letting them see Arachnophobia? Spiders don't come out of your shower drain, you know.... if you're really afraid of spiders then they can come out of nowhere... and they grow... and they bite...


anyhoo - isn't Legend a sci fi flick and not a horror flick? i haven't seen it yet but i was comparing it to Planet of the Apes type of flicker. however, it may be like a 39 Weeks Later which is definitely a horrifying sci fi flick imo.

maestrowork
12-17-2007, 05:54 PM
They are calling this 2.8 Years Later. LOL.

III
12-17-2007, 06:18 PM
I saw this yesterday at the IMAX and like JComp said, the Batman trailer was the best part. Still, it was a pretty decent movie. The abandoned, overgrown New York was definitely the most interesting and memorable aspect of the film. There were a few good jump / scares. Will Smith did his usual excellent job. But the monsters were sooooo CGI. I felt like I was watching a video game, not a movie. CGI is sucking the life out of storytelling. Oh, but my 8 year old son and his buddy enjoyed the film. They were a little scared during it, but laughed it off afterwards.

maestrowork
12-17-2007, 10:50 PM
One thing I kept wondering was this: here's a guy, isolated, despaired, depressed, lost his wife and daughter, alone in the world, breaks into cars and houses, etc. etc. Look, how clean his house is. I don't know a single guy who cleans his house so well.

Shadow_Ferret
12-17-2007, 10:55 PM
I think Will Smith is that dude....

What dude?

Jcomp
12-18-2007, 02:53 AM
What dude?

That dude. Ha.

I think, as far as acting, he gets a bad rep for letting his own personality dominate his roles, but I think that only applies to the huge blockbuster stuff he's done, and the stuff that was obviously done for a check (Wild Wild West for instance). Otherwise, Enemy of the State, Ali, Six Degrees of Separation, Bagger Vance, The Pursuit of Happyness, the Ben Verene episode of Fresh Prince of Bel Air that still makes me choke up a little bit when I see it in reruns... he's shown that he's not just some egomaniac who has to prove himself bigger than the role.

maestrowork
12-18-2007, 03:07 AM
I like Will. I think he's good here, but to me, he's still Will in this movie. What impressed me was Pursuit of Happyness -- his bigger-than-life personality almost disappeared, and he, IMO, rightfully deserved his second Oscar nomination for that. You won't see a nomination for I Am Legend, however.

nevada
12-18-2007, 03:24 AM
Maestro, maybe he keeps his house clean as a last connection to being civilized? Have no idea, havent seen the movie yet, but it could be a way for him to feel like he hasn't lost all control Maybe he is the only man on earth, maybe his life is totally falling apart, but at least his house is clean and he practices personal hygiene. Just guessing. I haven't made my bed in 20 yrs so I don't know what it feels like. lol

Don Allen
12-18-2007, 05:17 AM
That dude. Ha.

I think, as far as acting, he gets a bad rep for letting his own personality dominate his roles, but I think that only applies to the huge blockbuster stuff he's done, and the stuff that was obviously done for a check (Wild Wild West for instance). Otherwise, Enemy of the State, Ali, Six Degrees of Separation, Bagger Vance, The Pursuit of Happyness, the Ben Verene episode of Fresh Prince of Bel Air that still makes me choke up a little bit when I see it in reruns... he's shown that he's not just some egomaniac who has to prove himself bigger than the role.
Hey J..

The man can act and actually saved the flick from being a flop, Smith ain't the problem with the movie, it was the "hurry up and let's finish it attitude" of the writers...

NikeeGoddess
12-18-2007, 05:19 AM
Look, how clean his house is. I don't know a single guy who cleans his house so well.
hey! maybe he's gay. or a closet gay. gay men - clean. straight men - stinky!

and maestro - maybe you should get out more. there's no harm in knowing a gay guy. guilt by association is no longer a valid excuse... unless you tap your toes in the bathroom stall.

VeggieChick
12-20-2007, 01:06 AM
Will was great in the film. I think it takes a hell of a good actor to pull off carrying a film alone. I'm not sure how I feel about the movie being so different to the book. I figured they were going to change it, but I thought they would do it in order for the main character to survive in the end. If you're going to kill the guy anyway, why not keep the same storyline? It was more creepy that way! He was REALLY the last one. THE LAST ONE. No happy, happy colony of people waiting up there in the countryside. That kind of bothered me. Oh, yeah, I was also hoping they would spare the dog. You know... I hate it that they always kill the dogs. Leave the poor things alone!!

mkcbunny
12-21-2007, 04:38 AM
... I have a feeling this was done on purpose to get people to buy the stupid DVD. If that is the case, I'll probably stop watching movies altogether. If it was just the result of a mad dash to publication---well, I'm a bit more sympathetic to that.

I guessed it was time. To shorten it down. But I felt the same way about the lead vampire's motivation. I agree with everything you said. Except ... sniff sniff ... I haven't quite gotten to the end of the book yet, so now I know how it ends. LOL. I figured it didn't hurt to see the movie since I've seen the other two versions and would have no way of knowing which came closet to the book ending. Turns out that none of them really seem to carry it through.

Last Man on Earth is pretty boring, and the overdubbing is terrible. At least Omega Man has some entertainment quality and the bleakness of empty LA is pretty interesting. And Chuck's always good for some popcorn. Compared to those two, I Am Legend is better, though the book is creeping me out far more than any of the films.

mkcbunny
12-21-2007, 04:43 AM
If you're going to kill the guy anyway, why not keep the same storyline? AGreed.


Oh, yeah, I was also hoping they would spare the dog. You know... I hate it that they always kill the dogs. Leave the poor things alone!!
You know, the minute I saw the dog in the ads, and not knowing anything about the brief dog appearance in the book because I hadn't gotten that far yet, I figured that, dramatically, that movie dog had to go. I was prepared for it, but it was still really sad.

JoNightshade
12-21-2007, 05:02 AM
I really liked this movie. When it ended, I turned to my husband and said, "Is it just me, or was this movie about a zombie getting revenge for the death of his girlfriend?" :)

As for the differences between the movie and the book, we both thought that doing it according to the book would have made for one heck of a boring movie. It's something that works in prose but just not on the big screen, in my opinion.

Straka
12-23-2007, 08:53 PM
My g/f thought the same thing about the zombie gf.

Its was an ok film. I don't think Will was suite to the roll of the "last" man in the world. In some ways I don't think he was crazy enough. I think Tom Hawks was more convincing in Castway in that respect and he didn't have zombies to contend with.

Otherwise if people want to see a interesting movie about the end of the world and a guy and his dog I suggest Don Johnson "A Boy and his Dog."

The ending will surprise you ;-)

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/f/f3/1976_movie_poster_for_the_movie_'a_boy_and_his_dog '.jpg/392px-1976_movie_poster_for_the_movie_'a_boy_and_his_dog '.jpg

LIVIN
12-24-2007, 12:50 AM
The thing I thought about most during the movie was the foliage all over NYC. I thought some things were forced, not believable, and the ending didn't work.

Straka
12-24-2007, 01:00 AM
oh and the shinny car (ad placement) in the beginning pissed me off.

Remember when the world gets consumed by a virus, have on hand your car wax to make sure your new mustage is shinny to pick up the... well there are no more ladies are there?

mkcbunny
12-24-2007, 08:31 AM
I just finished the book today, and I think it made me like the Will Smith movie ending even less than I already did. As dull as the Vincent Price version is, I have to give it credit for being moderately on point. None of them get to the idea that Nevell goes out hunting down pre-vampires every day, and the moral questions there. I think it could be done, and it could make an interesting movie, but it wouldn't be a Will Smith blockbuster movie.

WriterGirl2007
12-24-2007, 10:12 AM
I liked the movie! The ending was a bit contrived. I absolutely ADORED the dog and cried and cried when Sam was gone. :( :( :( I will NEVER hear the song "Don't worry about a thing, cuz everything's going to be all right," without crying again. In fact, just thinking about that song is making me sad. :(


None of them get to the idea that Nevell goes out hunting down pre-vampires every day.

Ya know, in I am Legend, Will Smith is trying to cure them... But it does give an idea that he traps them very frequently. There were sooooooo many pictures of dead zombies on his wall.

NikeeGoddess
12-24-2007, 05:06 PM
oh and the shinny car (ad placement) in the beginning pissed me off. it was the shiny car in the end (when the woman and boy made it to vermont) that was the most ridiculous. that car was so, so pretty.

anyhoo:
- i thought it was a cross between 28 weeks later (the man eating zombies and where the cure for the virus survives for a possible sequel) and castaway (the complete isolation where a man uses mannequins as his friends).

- i found it spot on that the newscast in the beginning focused on the sporting events of the day BEFORE they spoke to a doctor who claimed to have the cure for cancer. we do have our priorities mixed up... you freakin' tabloid reporters!

- the saddest part was when the dog got attacked and died

Straka
12-24-2007, 07:13 PM
I also wondered if the Main Monster guy could set up such an elaborate trap involving a dummy he knew Smith talked too, a stare in the water that was hooked to a car... that all he could do was run into the glass wall at the end? Me thinks he would have figured out how to use a tool instead of mess up his pretty face.

nevada
12-24-2007, 07:48 PM
OMG the dog dies? Now I can't go see it. I can't handle dying dogs. Kill thousands of people in bloody ways, but don't touch the dogs. I'm only half kidding. Nothing will make me cry faster than animals suffering. I watched Black Beauty once, on tv. Started half way through, so I didnt even see the beginning, and by the end of the movie I was sobbing. But good to know, I won't go see it with a date then. No good to be blubbering in front of some guy you just barely met.

Jcomp
12-24-2007, 08:11 PM
I also wondered if the Main Monster guy could set up such an elaborate trap involving a dummy he knew Smith talked too, a stare in the water that was hooked to a car... that all he could do was run into the glass wall at the end? Me thinks he would have figured out how to use a tool instead of mess up his pretty face.

I think he was, at that point, consumed with the rage and impatience. It's easier to think clearly and develop a trap, I would imagine, when you're not in the heat of the moment.

mkcbunny
12-26-2007, 10:39 AM
OMG the dog dies? Now I can't go see it. I can't handle dying dogs. Kill thousands of people in bloody ways, but don't touch the dogs. I'm only half kidding. Nothing will make me cry faster than animals suffering. I watched Black Beauty once, on tv. Started half way through, so I didnt even see the beginning, and by the end of the movie I was sobbing. But good to know, I won't go see it with a date then. No good to be blubbering in front of some guy you just barely met.

On the one hand, it was a completely predictable, manipulative, tear-jerking moment. How can we not cry over the dog? On the other hand, I felt more for the character at that moment than any other. So it did serve a purpose.

Straka
12-27-2007, 06:53 AM
I think he was, at that point, consumed with the rage and impatience. It's easier to think clearly and develop a trap, I would imagine, when you're not in the heat of the moment.

Naw I don't buy that. He wasn't even using his hands, but merely running into the glass with his face. I think the producers just were trying to make him more monstrous.

Had they gone the route of the book, I think the film would have been more interesting.

Jcomp
12-27-2007, 07:17 AM
Naw I don't buy that. He wasn't even using his hands, but merely running into the glass with his face. I think the producers just were trying to make him more monstrous.

Had they gone the route of the book, I think the film would have been more interesting.

Well, yeah. More monstrous makes sense. Just because he developed a trap that he copied from Neville doesn't suddenly make him civilized.

And I think it's a lot tougher--practically impossible from a film standpoint--to effectively go the route of the book. You have to spend so much more time on exposition really explaining how everyone turned into actual vampires. It probably wouldn't fly with modern audiences. How do you present it, and make it believable (which was one major strength of the original story) without loading the film with tedious plot-dumping?

I love the original story--Matheson is brilliant as far as I'm concerned--but saying that the disease essentially turned everyone into adrenaline-fueled, rabid savages works better on film. It allows you to still tell a complete story and focus on character without one of those ridiculous, overlong run-times so many directors seem fond of these days.

Just my take.

Straka
12-27-2007, 07:29 AM
You bring up a good point. I think I would have liked to see that darker side like in the book where he hunts them during the day. But that brings up the ethical issues that you pointed out are harder to bring about in film. Almost a chicken before the egg sort of thing.

Personally I would have preferred a more thought provoking version, but hey that's not always how you make the big bucks on the silver screen.

Jcomp
12-27-2007, 07:51 AM
You bring up a good point. I think I would have liked to see that darker side like in the book where he hunts them during the day. But that brings up the ethical issues that you pointed out are harder to bring about in film. Almost a chicken before the egg sort of thing.

Personally I would have preferred a more thought provoking version, but hey that's not always how you make the big bucks on the silver screen.

The darker elements would've been cool to see. I'm just hoping that they don't include them on the "unrated" DVD. Not that I don't want to see those scenes, but I hate it when the studios do that.

Straka
12-27-2007, 07:54 AM
I also don't get the point of marketing pushing the "multiple endings"

In video games its one think as you work towards one ending or another but for films just seems like something they do for test audiences. But again in a high stakes business I suppose that's what you have to do.

The_Grand_Duchess
12-28-2007, 08:14 AM
I liked the movie. Then again I haven't read the book.

And also, he was a military man. That's why he was so clean and organized. Duh!

AndrewB
12-28-2007, 08:29 AM
Here is something I am toying with as an idea. The main monster is the father of the girl Neville captures. Why I think this is because, right after that he says something like "I saw a (monster) today ignore the light and step out of the darkness. I can now say all human aspects are now gone."

Thus saying, they are no longer human and unable to think, yet the monster out smarts him. I don't know, just a random idea I was having.

Bartholomew
12-28-2007, 10:21 AM
Here is something I am toying with as an idea. The main monster is the father of the girl Neville captures. Why I think this is because, right after that he says something like "I saw a (monster) today ignore the light and step out of the darkness. I can now say all human aspects are now gone."

Thus saying, they are no longer human and unable to think, yet the monster out smarts him. I don't know, just a random idea I was having.

That moment would have made sense if the script had been following the book.

Since it doesn't, however, it feels as if the writers were building up toward something and never developed the idea.

VeggieChick
12-28-2007, 08:32 PM
OMG the dog dies? Now I can't go see it. I can't handle dying dogs. Kill thousands of people in bloody ways, but don't touch the dogs. I'm only half kidding. Nothing will make me cry faster than animals suffering. I watched Black Beauty once, on tv. Started half way through, so I didnt even see the beginning, and by the end of the movie I was sobbing. But good to know, I won't go see it with a date then. No good to be blubbering in front of some guy you just barely met.

Yeah, I have to agree. I HATE HATE HATE it when movies feel the need to kill the pets (although the dog also dies in the book, so I was kind of expecting it anyway). It just seems the easy way out and it makes me cry every single time.

rhymegirl
12-29-2007, 03:27 AM
I just saw this film today. I liked it.

The main thing I focused on was the idea of being (or thinking you are) the only human left on earth. Would you want to be? No one to talk to, listen to, interact with, get intimate with.

I liked that whole thought-provoking aspect. How many of us could honestly say they'd want to keep going every day if they knew they were alone in the world? What would motivate you to get up each day and want to live? I know this particular guy wanted to find a cure for the virus, wanted to "fix it", and that was his motivation, but anybody else would just go nuts or die of loneliness, I guess.

It reminded me a little of the Tom Hanks movie, Castaway, only Tom's character didn't have to worry about zombies.

D.J.
12-29-2007, 03:47 AM
Well, that leaves me out. I can't watch it if the dog dies. I get too hysterical when that happens.

mkcbunny
12-31-2007, 08:32 AM
Well, that leaves me out. I can't watch it if the dog dies. I get too hysterical when that happens.

And it doesn't just die. I won't say more, only that it's a very sad death.

zahra
01-04-2008, 12:14 AM
Just saw this yesterday and I actually liked it a lot, despite some misgivings.

Sticking to the book would have made Neville very unlikeable (well, I disliked the book Neville, though I was still able to root for him) but I still would have preferred it that way. I really missed the neighbour's 'Come on out, Neville', and the flash-back illness, deaths, burial laws scenes.

I totally understand why he was so neat - same reason he nagged the dog to eat its veggies and gave it baths. He's trying to hold on to a lost normality, with the dog pretty clearly a substitute child - during the times they are at home and safe.

The log-line they used in the UK made me laugh, though: 'The last man on earth is not alone'. Was I the only one who instantly thought, 'Cool, at least he's got the chicks all to himself'?

maestrowork
01-04-2008, 01:38 AM
SPOILER***


Someone on another board asked: How did that woman and the boy get to the island (remember, all access to the island have been destroyed)?

I didn't think of that -- good point. (It is plausible that she operated a ferry to transport her car to the island... who knows?)

But what got me was Neville said he would be there every day at mid day. He was there at mid day, the girl wasn't there. And then he went back that night (for that scene) and lo and behold, she was there to save his ass. Why would she be there in the middle of the night when she knew there would be zombies running around? If you say she just arrived -- it doesn't make sense either. Seems like if she wanted to catch Smith at mid day she would have started driving in the morning (she lives in Maryland). Totally bogus logic to me. That's when the film lost me. Then came the whole "God" thing -- I remember rolling my eyes.

Jcomp
01-04-2008, 02:35 AM
SPOILER***


Someone on another board asked: How did that woman and the boy get to the island (remember, all access to the island have been destroyed)?

I didn't think of that -- good point. (It is plausible that she operated a ferry to transport her car to the island... who knows?)

But what got me was Neville said he would be there every day at mid day. He was there at mid day, the girl wasn't there. And then he went back that night (for that scene) and lo and behold, she was there to save his ass. Why would she be there in the middle of the night when she knew there would be zombies running around? If you say she just arrived -- it doesn't make sense either. Seems like if she wanted to catch Smith at mid day she would have started driving in the morning (she lives in Maryland). Totally bogus logic to me. That's when the film lost me. Then came the whole "God" thing -- I remember rolling my eyes.

Yeah. The more and more I think back on it and discuss it with people, the more I realized that the movie completely jumped the rails at this point. Which is a shame, because it's a great performance and it had so much potential, but it settled for "pretty good" instead of fantastic.

Perks
01-20-2008, 11:38 PM
I got to see this last night and I enjoyed myself thoroughly. Will Smith is just a genius and the tension they managed to draw out made it one of the more giddy cinematic experiences I've had in ages.

Loved it.

Now I'll go see what the rest of fine people had to say about it.

Perks
01-20-2008, 11:45 PM
I see that a lot of people had a problem with the third act, but I was already hooked for the ride, so it didn't bother me. I'd very much like to read the book now.

I do have to say that those were the worst CG lions ever. Note to movie-maker-people: best get someone who's actually seen a real lion to draw you one, not just some computer geek who has had one described to him once.

Bmwhtly
01-21-2008, 01:30 PM
OK, I saw this over the weekend.

It was better than I expected. But still, well, bollocks.


I did go in with incredibly low expectations. Mainly because the last adaptation of classic sci-fi that Will Smith did was I, Robot. And that was an absolute disaster - mainly because (aside from the fact that there were robots in it) it had nothing in common with the book.

I was glad that this stayed closer to the book than I, robot did.
But it wasn't close enough to save the film.

Especially the last line, making out that the film was called I am Legend because his legend was the cure to infection. Bollocks.

Will Smith did a very good job of portraying Neville as a characterThat was an upside, he turned in a good performance.
But SHAME on the script writers for taking the story, altering it SO dramatically, and then having the audacity to call it by the same name.

The title, of course, makes zero sense the way they ended he movie.Oh, you already made my point.
Ah well.


oh and the shinny car (ad placement) in the beginning pissed me off.It would take a nerd to note that that was a Shelby Mustang GT500.
And an absolute geek to note that they need all the help they can get in selling that absolute turkey of an automobile.

I do have to say that those were the worst CG lions ever. That thought did occur to me too.


Now then, I appeal to all of you, if you haven't seen the film - don't.
If you have and were a little dissapointed, go read the book. That'll angry up your blood. :)

rhymegirl
01-22-2008, 03:41 AM
I didn't understand why he was chasing after the deer in the beginning. Was it for sport or in order to have some meat for dinner?

maestrowork
01-22-2008, 03:52 AM
Dinner.

They've been eating veggies and canned food for way too long.

rhymegirl
01-22-2008, 03:53 AM
SPOILER***
Someone on another board asked: How did that woman and the boy get to the island (remember, all access to the island have been destroyed)?

I saw the film with my three sisters, and my oldest sister had this same question. (I hadn't noticed the discrepancy.) You can't get much past her. She said, "But weren't all of the bridges out? How did the woman and her son get to NY?"

Perks
01-22-2008, 05:16 AM
It would take a nerd to note that that was a Shelby Mustang GT500.
And an absolute geek to note that they need all the help they can get in selling that absolute turkey of an automobile.
Well, you know me and my cars. I hate the Mustang. The Shelby GT is the prettiest of the galumping things, but I don't know what sort of consolation prize being the best-looking box turtle is.

Bmwhtly
01-22-2008, 12:26 PM
"But weren't all of the bridges out? How did the woman and her son get to NY?"A boat?

It didn't look like THAT big of a chunk of water to me... a dinghy could cross it surely?
Although how they got their car across is another matter.

Bmwhtly
01-22-2008, 12:29 PM
The Shelby GT is the prettiest of the galumping things, but I don't know what sort of consolation prize being the best-looking box turtle is.
TG looked at it a while ago.
They found it to be lacking in power and built out of prehistoric tech.
The Shelby got stigged in 1.30
The Roush got stigged in 1.28

dpaterso
01-22-2008, 01:35 PM
OK, I saw this over the weekend.

It was better than I expected. But still, well, bollocks.
That's good enough for me. I wasn't feeling particularly attracted to the film anyway.


...the last adaptation of classic sci-fi that Will Smith did was I, Robot. And that was an absolute disaster - mainly because (aside from the fact that there were robots in it) it had nothing in common with the book.
Damn straight. Asimov's sublime paranoia SF didn't translate well to action SF. Crap adaptation.

I watched the Vincent Price version on Sunday. It had the right atmosphere. And zombies. Quite fascinating in places.

-Derek

mzr
01-22-2008, 02:20 PM
it is like just one stuff from resident evil series

Perks
01-22-2008, 04:56 PM
TG looked at it a while ago.
They found it to be lacking in power and built out of prehistoric tech.
The Shelby got stigged in 1.30
The Roush got stigged in 1.28I remember that one. The Mustang seems to have lost a lot of it's cool. I still admire the old ones, but the new ones, even if driven by Will Smith through a weedy New York City, always look like Wal-Mart knock offs.

Bmwhtly
01-22-2008, 05:07 PM
"But weren't all of the bridges out? How did the woman and her son get to NY?"

Actually, to me, that wasn't the biggest plot hole.


*SPOILERIFIC*


How likely is it that he'd have a full lab in a bunker under his house?
Sure, a lab in a bunker is one thing. But that was his house, why would the army do that for him? exactly.

mkcbunny
01-26-2008, 12:26 PM
I saw the film with my three sisters, and my oldest sister had this same question. (I hadn't noticed the discrepancy.) You can't get much past her. She said, "But weren't all of the bridges out? How did the woman and her son get to NY?"

It was definitely a boat. It's been a couple of months since I saw it, but she said when she arrived that she came up from .. (wherever, South Carolina? Honestly, I don't recall), and a quick mention of why. I think Coast Guard or something that would automatically register as boat-related. I know that's horribly vague proof, but it's only because it's been so long since I've seen it. There was a reason that was boat-related.

I wondered about the lab, too. As important as his character was to the potential solution for the problem, it isn't as though they could have erected that super lab on the eve of armageddon-by-mutants.

To a completely separate line of thought: I liked I, Robot. I just looked at it like it was not Asimov. As an A.I.-rights action-thriller, it was pretty good.

underthecity
01-28-2008, 05:01 AM
I saw the film with my three sisters, and my oldest sister had this same question. (I hadn't noticed the discrepancy.) You can't get much past her. She said, "But weren't all of the bridges out? How did the woman and her son get to NY?"

We saw it today. We enjoyed it, but there were issues.

I mentioned this one to my wife, and she reminded me that Anna said that they heard Will Smith's signal in Maryland and she and four other people, including young Ethan, came to find him. They took a ferry across the river, and the "dark lurkers" (?) attacked and killed three of them.

Her accent was a little hard to follow sometimes, but my wife caught it.

allen