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FrankWriter
07-25-2004, 08:35 AM
Hello,

After reading the many posts on this board and using Google to look up other's agents, I wonder if anyone knows anything about this agency?

They seem to be new. Is a new agency more approachable by a new author? Do they have the same chance as any other big agency. I mean, aren't the big guys harder to get representation with than a new guy on the block?
:shrug

And for those of you already published, do you know anything about these guys?

Frank

FrankWriter
07-25-2004, 08:38 AM
almost forgot the link to them:

<a href="http://www.geocities.com/cjstender/" target="_new">www.geocities.com/cjstender/</a>

aka eraser
07-25-2004, 08:03 PM
I have a hunch even Dave and Victoria haven't heard much, if anything, about these guys. They've only been in business for three months and it doesn't look like they've placed a book yet.

The founder doesn't appear to have a lot of experience in the field. There's a brief mention of having been an acquisitions editor but it doesn't say with what firm.

They appear to abide by the AAR code but haven't qualified as members yet. My impression is that they aspire to be a legit agency but their inexperience would make me wary.

I think there's something to be said for a young, hungry agency being a good fit with a first-time author but if they don't have the contacts....

I'd keep looking.

By the way Frank, nice name. :)

James D Macdonald
07-25-2004, 10:18 PM
If you haven't read <a href="http://nielsenhayden.com/makinglight/archives/004772.html" target="_new">this article</a> you should.

In general, a useful agent is one who has sold books you've heard of.

RejectME
09-11-2004, 10:57 PM
Does anyone have any information about this new agency and it's founder, Dr. Uwe Stender?

Torin
02-20-2005, 02:22 AM
All I know is that their site says they're looking forward to making their first sale. Not too promising.

victoriastrauss
02-20-2005, 03:42 AM
This agency has been in business for about a year now, and has yet to make a sale. This isn't a good sign--an agency that's going to be successful will usually start making regular sales within six months to a year of starting up.

Mr. Stender seems to have abundant enthusiasm and good will. What he doesn't appear to have is recent US/UK industry experience (he was an acquisitions editor for German publisher Bastei in the early 1980's). This is a handicap--people who lack experience tend to have a very tough time breaking in. It can happen, but it can take quite a while, and it's the clients who pay the price of the wait.

- Victoria

Uwe
03-02-2005, 12:23 AM
I understand your concerns. Nobody wishes more for a sale than I do.

I can assure you, though, that all of my client's projects have been and are being considered by the right editors and that I have been close to a sale several times, but ultimately, the editors/editorial boards/ (in one case) the publisher decided that the respective project was not right for him/her/them. Ultimately, especially in case of first time authors (who are the majority of my clients), an editor has to either totally fall in love with the project or has to be willing to take a leap of faith to see if this new writer can be "broken into" this tough marketplace.

I am very hopeful that my first sale will occur within the "one year mark," (still have 2 months for that, as I incorporated in late April 2004)) but I have the determination to see this through even if it takes longer.

I believe that (initially) the most important thing is for my clients' projects to be in front of the proper editors and that their projects are actually being read and considered. And that is, in fact, happening.

I hope (and am confident) that soon my first sales will occur.
Best,
Uwe, Founder of TriadaUS.

DeadlyAccurate
04-08-2005, 11:11 PM
Any updates on sales by this agency? I know it's only been 5 weeks since the last post, but the agent said he was confident in a sale before month's end.

zizban
04-09-2005, 12:50 AM
Here's the latest news from the website:

TriadaUS agreed with Danae DiNicola of Danae DiNicola agency to exclusively subagent FILM and TELEVISION RIGHTS for Barry McArdle's I SOLD THE MOON. We hope that this will be the beginning of a long and successful relationship between our two agencies.

I have no idea what this means but I didn't find any book sales, but then again the website was light brown, making it hard for me to read.

dragonjax
04-09-2005, 01:23 AM
In my own dealings with Uwe, I found him to be a very, very nice person. I wish him and his agency nothing but the best. That being said, I am offering my own experience with him, below, for you to mull over. Take away from it what you will.

Uwe requested the full of my fantasy, after a reader read the partial and loved the prologue but hated the first three chapters because they were too slow. Uwe sent the full to the same reader. I received a response in roughly a month. Excellent RT.

I was a bit dismayed that the reader professed "great experience" in the SF/F genre and that he was "well read," yet he'd never before seen the word "anathema." In addition, the reader felt that I overused "anathema" (a total of three times in a 104,000 word manuscript--once at the beginning, once about 1/3 of the way in , and once toward the end, and in two of the three times the usage was in the context of religion) and wanted me to use a synonym. (If he would have opened a dictionary, he would have seen that my usage was, in fact, correct.)

Another sticking point for me was that this reader also wanted me to "inflate" my manuscript -- I'm a first-time author -- because clocking in at 384 pages -- yes, pages -- was pretty slim for a fantasy novel. I was greatly disturbed that the reader (A) went by page count instead of word count -- like I said above, my WC was 104,000; if I had printed the story in 12-point Courier with 1.25" margins, I could have had 550 pages; and (B) wanted me to "inflate" the story. My own research shows that fat books and first-time authors don't mix, period, and that having a manuscript at 104,000 words for a fantasy is just right.

Last, Uwe forwared the reader's feedback to me, but he didn't offer his own opinion on it, let alone offer direction other than a somewhat cryptic "promising"-- was this an acceptance? A rejection? A note to revise? I don't know.

I thanked Uwe for forwarding me the feedback. I did appreciate it; there were a few nuggets in there. But ultimately, I did not ask Uwe what the next steps were, and I moved on. In addition, I chose not to raise the points I'm making here with Uwe himself; I figured he trusted his reader, and that was good enough for me. Perhaps I made a huge mistake. Perhaps not. Simply put, I did not agree with what the reader said, and I let it go at that.

Again, I want to reiterate that I highly respect Uwe, and I hope he makes the first of many sales to come. I know some of his clients, and I wish them the best, as well as Uwe.

Vomaxx
04-09-2005, 01:51 AM
I suppose this greatly-experienced SF/F reader was the same one who finished off my submission: having sent a partial (as requested), I received an e-mail from Dr. Stender saying simply, "My associate, who is the one specializing in sci-fi and fantasy, has told me that while your query is interesting, he is not the right agent for the manuscript as it did not hold his attention as it should in order for him to go to bat for it."


Oh, well, at least he didn't say the book was too short (at 120,000 words).

dragonjax
04-09-2005, 02:23 AM
Vomaxx, if it is the same person, then I got the feeling he's not very into character development; more of a rough-and-tough action, heavy magic sorta fantasy reader.

zizban
04-09-2005, 02:33 AM
Vomaxx, if it is the same person, then I got the feeling he's not very into character development; more of a rough-and-tough action, heavy magic sorta fantasy reader.

Wow, sounds like my WIP. There is hope!!
:tongue

victoriastrauss
04-09-2005, 03:58 AM
What I wonder is whether this reader has any qualifications to be an agent, or to pass judgment on what is and isn't marketable.

- Victoria

dragonjax
04-09-2005, 04:05 AM
Given that I only have a first name for the person who read my MS (Paul), I have no idea. What's clear is that Uwe, who referred to him as his "associate," seems to trust his view implicitly. (I have my own opinion, of course, which is why I wound up not pursing this any further.)

HapiSofi
04-12-2005, 12:52 AM
Diagnosis: gormless wanna-be agent. No malign intent, but not likely to do you or your book any good.

In the current market, a first-time fantasy author whose book is already clocking in at 104,000 words should definitely not be encouraged to make it longer; and no one should ever be told to "inflate" a manuscript.

Large-scale fantasy novels always have plenty of opportunities for editorial nitpicking, even if they were written by well-regarded professionals. If this reader can't think of anything better to say than "it should be longer" and "you use 'anathema' too often," he or she doesn't have an editorial turn of mind, and can be ignored.

James D. Macdonald
07-26-2005, 05:48 AM
Triadus has been in operation for over a year now. Does anyone know if Dr. Uwe Stender has placed any books yet?

Perks
07-26-2005, 06:07 AM
His website indicates a recent deal for a nonfiction book about the cultural relevance of the TV series Lost. But perhaps the site isn't all the way up to date. One of his clients died last fall and it still says that he lives in Del Mar California...http://www.geocities.com/cjstender/News.htm

dragonjax
07-26-2005, 06:50 AM
His website indicates a recent deal for a nonfiction book about the cultural relevance of the TV series Lost. But perhaps the site isn't all the way up to date. One of his clients died last fall and it still says that he lives in Del Mar California...[/url]
Oh boy. Someone should let him know that the site needs to be updated...

victoriastrauss
07-26-2005, 07:08 PM
His website indicates a recent deal for a nonfiction book about the cultural relevance of the TV series Lost.That sale, to Sourcebooks, is solid (Sourcebooks does accept unagented proposals, but it also regularly works with agents).

- Victoria

Sakamonda
08-22-2005, 12:32 AM
I am one of Uwe Stender's clients. He is a new agent, but a good one with excellent contacts. He just made his first sale to Sourcebooks recently. I am still waiting for my novel to sell, but he has been able to get my novel manuscript in front of editors at numerous big imprints----Broadway, St. Martins, Pocket, Llewyllen, Atria, Red Dress Ink, and Kensington, to name a few. He queries editors first and only submits manuscripts to those editors who specifically request them. He is enthusiastic, aggressive, and highly organized. He also has never charged me a dime. I recommend him highly.

PurpleLady
10-01-2005, 05:02 AM
Thank you for sharing your experience with Uwe and the Triada staff(?). I submitted a query and have been asked to submit a synopsis and the first 50 pages of my novel. I will do this, but one thing strikes me as being a bit odd - my email query included a synopsis of the novel. Five of the seven paragraphs tell the story. If I include a separate synopsis with the 50 pages, it will essentially say the same thing. According to the typed signature, Uwe signed the email. This may be a small thing, but I'm a stickler for detail. Requesting a synopsis after I already inquired with one just doesn't feel right.

Kasey Mackenzie
10-01-2005, 05:31 AM
This is not unusual at all. The synopsis you include with a query is not the same as a regular synopsis. What you include with a query is much shorter and less detailed. Synopses themselves are longer and much more detailed and also include the ending--which queries may or may not do. Synopses can vary in length from one page to 10 or even more, but the general length I've noticed is usually 3 to 5 double-spaced pages. Synopses can be a pain to write but they are a useful tool for the agent. Congrats on the request, btw!

PurpleLady
10-01-2005, 05:57 AM
RP,
Thank you for the clarification. I've seen requests for relatively short synopsis, but was not aware of the longer versions.

Appreciate the congratulations, too. Since I just began looking for an agent earlier this month, I consider myself lucky that this is the first bite I've had. I have submitted four queries to other agents, in hopes that I will catch a brass ring, so to speak. Haven't heard from any of them yet, but a couple have 8 - 12 week response times. In the meantime, I'll keep keeping on.

Perks
10-01-2005, 06:08 AM
RP,
Thank you for the clarification. I've seen requests for relatively short synopsis, but was not aware of the longer versions.

Appreciate the congratulations, too. Since I just began looking for an agent earlier this month, I consider myself lucky that this is the first bite I've had. I have submitted four queries to other agents, in hopes that I will catch a brass ring, so to speak. Haven't heard from any of them yet, but a couple have 8 - 12 week response times. In the meantime, I'll keep keeping on.

I imagine you've read this entire thread. My experience with Uwe is not posted here, because it would have been redundant. He's very pleasant and enthusiastic, but for first-timers, the TriadaUS experience can be an roller coaster ride. Good luck!

Sakamonda
10-01-2005, 07:39 PM
With all due respect to Perks, the publishing industry is a roller-coaster ride for EVERYONE, whether you are a first-timer or not. Uwe Stender shouldn't be singled out in that respect.

victoriastrauss
10-01-2005, 08:30 PM
My experience with Uwe is not posted here, because it would have been redundant. He's very pleasant and enthusiastic, but for first-timers, the TriadaUS experience can be an roller coaster ride.How so? I'd be interested to know.

- Victoria

Perks
10-01-2005, 08:38 PM
With all due respect to Perks, the publishing industry is a roller-coaster ride for EVERYONE, whether you are a first-timer or not. Uwe Stender shouldn't be singled out in that respect.

Actually, yes he should and he and I have spoken about what was mishandled in our correspondence. I found Uwe to be very enthusiastic, which can be good, but can also, when not tempered with enough professionalism, make an inherently grueling process more emotional than it needs to be.

I like Uwe and I wish him well and I hope that he finds a stride in this business. His zeal may well end up being the thing that brings him success. That being said, I stand by my caution to eager first-time authors in getting swept away on a wave of positive feedback that may outrun its ability to produce a working relationship.

Sakamonda
10-01-2005, 08:59 PM
Perks, I still don't get what your concern with Uwe is. Are you a current/former client who was/is dissatisfied with his services, or just someone that he rejected?

Perks
10-01-2005, 09:24 PM
Perks, I still don't get what your concern with Uwe is. Are you a current/former client who was/is dissatisfied with his services, or just someone that he rejected?

Cool, I get to quote myself! Never done that before. I expressed my concern last post:


I found Uwe to be very enthusiastic, which can be good, but can also, when not tempered with enough professionalism, make an inherently grueling process more emotional than it needs to be.


And to satisfy your curiousity, yes, my manuscript was ultimately rejected by Dr. Stender. I take no issue with that. It has happened before and is likely to happen again; such is the business. PurpleLady's very first agent contact being TriadaUS inspired me to comment here, based on my experience with Uwe Stender and TriadaUS. Hopefully all is well there and my concern is old news...

Sakamonda
10-01-2005, 09:55 PM
So what you're saying, Perks, is that your concern is with the fact that Dr. Stender rejected you with courtesy and enthusiasm?

Sorry, that just doesn't compute. There are very few agents out there that will bother to give you any encouragement or positive feedback with a rejection; I would think the fact that Dr. Stender is always very courteous and enthusiastic even when he rejects people should be considered a good thing, especially considering how many agents just sent out form rejections or are even rude when they reject people. I think maybe you're just a little bitter at the rejection, even though it was done courteously?

Perks
10-01-2005, 10:20 PM
No, Sakamonda, that's not what I'm saying and I am not bitter with Uwe Stender. I have not posted the full account of my dealings with him here, precisely because I am not bitter. There was an issue of professionalism that, as a new author and perhaps because he was a new agent, made the experience a negative one. It wasn't that long ago, so I said what I did for PurpleLady's information since she is just out of the gate herself.

I am very happy for you that you are enjoying your relationship with TriadaUS. I hope that PurpleLady also has good things to report. Uwe's willingness to provide in-depth feedback is a wonderful thing. My post regarding the nature of the feedback and its ramifications is not a singularity on this thread. Hopefully it's just growing pains. But, even if that is the case, it is a kindness to alert a newbie to something that may color her perceptions of this process.

Are you done taking shots at me for having an opinion and experience that differs from yours?

Sakamonda
10-01-2005, 11:15 PM
I'm not taking shots at you, I just think it's highly immature to get upset about an agent's supposed unprofessionalism when the only thing he did was to reject you with courtesy----and a lot more courtesy than most agents are willing to give, mind you. Many agents will do little more than send form rejections---there are even some out there who will insult you outright. I would therefore think Uwe's style would be appreciated, not regarded as unprofessional. Perhaps when you've been rejected by a lot more agents (and all of us are before we find an agent who loves our work, believe me) you'll appreciate Uwe's style more. I did not sign with Uwe until after I'd been in the trenches searching for agents for a long time, and I found his style a breath of fresh air after all the callous and even nasty rejections I'd received.

Perks
10-01-2005, 11:35 PM
This is my last post on the matter.
the only thing he did was to reject you with courtesy
You have no idea what transpired between Uwe Stender and myself. Please admit that and then let it go.

Perhaps when you've been rejected by a lot more agents (and all of us are before we find an agent who loves our work, believe me) you'll appreciate Uwe's style more.
You have no idea where I am in the process of agent-hunting and manuscript-peddling. Let that one go too.

I found his style a breath of fresh air
I hope that gets your book published for you.

Okay, nearly done here. I would recommend that you go through this thread and count posts that support my experience versus the ones that support yours. The good news is that your tenacity should serve you well in this business. In this case, though, it does not prove me wrong. A caution to PurpleLady with regards to her imminent dealings with TriadaUS is not mudslinging. There are several people on this thread who have formed an overall negative opinion after having dealt with Uwe and his associate. That's what this forum is about.

It is very important that you share your positive evaluation, just please afford others the same courtesy and let the chips fall where they may. When you have your five book deal from Doubleday in hand, then we will know that it was growing pains, sour grapes, bad luck or a combination of all three that sculpted our assessment of TriadaUS, Uwe Stender and his associate.

Sakamonda
10-02-2005, 06:52 AM
Perks, I re-read the posts you refer to and like you, the few that had negative things to say are writers Uwe Stender rejected. Frankly, writers who a legitimate agent rejected have very little credibility to criticize how good/not good an agent Uwe might be. Clients who have had their work represented by him are far better judges of whether Dr. Stender is an effective agent or not.

Funny, all of those Stender rejects on this thread thought well enough of Dr. Stender to submit their work to him; it's only after he rejected their work that the posters have negative things to say. Seems like pretty much classic sour grapes to me.

That said, I hope all of these writers are able to find suitable represenatation. But Perks, it is both immature and unprofessional to disparage an agent just for rejecting you. If you were a client and he had screwed up a contract deal on you or stiffed you on royalty splits or something, then that would be a legit complaint---but agents have the right to accept/reject who they wish when seeking new clients, and it goes without saying that this is a highly subjective business---an agent rejection doesn't mean your work is bad or isn't marketable, it just means that particular agent didn't think your work would work for them (i.e., make them $$). That's just par for the course.

And you would be far better to advise posters that rejections are the norm and frequently given in this business, and that they are to be expected----rather than steer a writer away from a potentially good agent for their work just because that agent happened to reject you. Again, sour grapes.

victoriastrauss
10-02-2005, 07:49 AM
Funny, all of those Stender rejects on this thread thought well enough of Dr. Stender to submit their work to him; it's only after he rejected their work that the posters have negative things to say. Seems like pretty much classic sour grapes to me.From what I've heard from a couple of writers who didn't wind up working with Dr. Stender, one problem lies with Dr. Stender's use of an associate to evaluate manuscripts. According to both these writers, one of whom provided me with documentation, the associate's feedback was extremely unprofessional and suggested s/he didn't have a lot of familiarity with the genres of the books in question. Reports like this are one reason that I continue to be somewhat skeptical of this agency.


But Perks, it is both immature and unprofessional to disparage an agent just for rejecting you.I think that if you read Perks's posts more carefully, you'll see that he or she isn't doing this at all. Perks stated quite clearly that the issue wasn't rejection, it was unprofessional behavior during the submissions process.

- Victoria

Sakamonda
10-02-2005, 03:38 PM
Victoria, while I think all the work that Writer Beware does is TERRIFIC, I am surprised that you would take issue with the fact that any agency uses associates to evaluate manuscripts, when virtually all agencies of any size do this; whether to process the large volumes of slush or to manage certain genres. I know in my agent search, 90% of the agencies I queried used associates for the first couple levels of the selection process (queries, partials, even the first reads on fulls). If it's Writer Beware's policy to question the use of associate agents, then most literary agencies would be considered bad, wouldn't they?

Torin
10-02-2005, 03:58 PM
Victoria, while I think all the work that Writer Beware does is TERRIFIC, I am surprised that you would take issue with the fact that any agency uses associates to evaluate manuscripts, when virtually all agencies of any size do this; whether to process the large volumes of slush or to manage certain genres. I know in my agent search, 90% of the agencies I queried used associates for the first couple levels of the selection process (queries, partials, even the first reads on fulls). If it's Writer Beware's policy to question the use of associate agents, then most literary agencies would be considered bad, wouldn't they?

But Victoria said:
the associate's feedback was extremely unprofessional and suggested s/he didn't have a lot of familiarity with the genres of the books in question.

Which says, to me, that it's not so much the use of an associate, but the use of an associate who doesn't know diddly about the genres s/he is screening and that the feedback from said associate was unprofessional. Associates are, indeed, part of the industry, but it helps if they know what they're doing. An agent with MBA started out reading slush and assisting the agents, and had familiarity with a wide variety of genres. She's now agent to several big name authors (Anne Perry is, or was, one of them). Uwe Stender might be better off using someone more familiar with the process, but the associate might also be learning as s/he goes. Maybe they've been friends for a long time--hard to say.

aruna
10-02-2005, 04:01 PM
Sakamonda, I interpreted Victoria's post to mean that this particular associate's work was unprofessional, not that she was against associates in general:


From what I've heard from a couple of writers who didn't wind up working with Dr. Stender, one problem lies with Dr. Stender's use of an associate to evaluate manuscripts. According to both these writers, one of whom provided me with documentation, the associate's feedback was extremely unprofessional and suggested s/he didn't have a lot of familiarity with the genres of the books in question.

Sakamonda
10-02-2005, 04:09 PM
Okay, I guess I see what Victoria's saying now.

That said, I've only dealt with Uwe directly, and all contact I've had with him has been absolutely professional and first-rate. I have not had any contact with this associate myself, although my newest novel manuscript was supposedly also read by him/her before Uwe read it.

However, if I had a nickel for all the nasty, rude, and unprofessional behavior I encountered from other agencies (all/most of them AAR) during my own agent search, I would have a quite large pile of money. This is a tough business on agents, too, and I guess that's why some of them behave the way they do (not that I'm condoning it) but there are plenty of "superstar" agents who don't exactly behave politely in their dealings with potential clients. Remember that the new novelist is really just a starving urchin begging for whatever crumbs the publishing world throws his/her way. . .

dragonjax
10-02-2005, 05:03 PM
Funny, all of those Stender rejects on this thread thought well enough of Dr. Stender to submit their work to him; it's only after he rejected their work that the posters have negative things to say. Seems like pretty much classic sour grapes to me.

This isn't true, Sak. Uwe didn't reject my full MS. After his reader sent feedback on it, Uwe said this was "Promising." *I* was the one who chose not to pursue it any further, because I strongly disagreed with his reader's feedback.

I like Uwe very much, and I am rooting for him as well as his clients, two of whom I know. If more agents were as nice as Uwe, I'm sure that would go far to penetrate the Agent Mystique that has many writers nervous about dealing with agents. Uwe is a gentleman, and I wish him nothing but the best.

Please do not make such sweeping accusations about those of us who posted about our experiences with Uwe and TriadaUS.

Sakamonda
10-02-2005, 05:13 PM
It would appear that I misread Dragonjax's earlier post. Sorry about that and thank you for clarifying.

But some of the others do appear to be angry just for being rejected. All rejections sting, it's true. But it's part and parcel of the writing business, like it or not.

three seven
10-02-2005, 05:44 PM
But some of the others do appear to be angry just for being rejected. All rejections sting, it's true. But it's part and parcel of the writing business, like it or not.Rejections? Part and parcel of the writing business? When did this happen and who authorised it?

Sakamonda, you seem to be under the impression that you're privy to some secret insider knowledge that your fellow members have yet to discover. A quick look elsewhere on the boards, however, may shine some much-needed light on our attitude to rejections.

Try to remember that there are people here who know the full stories behind some of these 'sour grapes', and who consider it bad form for you to wade in half-cocked and start calling people names.

Sakamonda
10-02-2005, 05:48 PM
I stand by my comments. I just have a hard time sympathizing with people who whine about rejections, when rejections are a daily occurrence in any serious writer's life. There just isn't much in most of the posters' comments to make me think it's more than that---whining. If they want to post more information to the contrary, it's their prerogative to do so---or not. But as it stands now, that's my opinion. Anyone is free to disagree with me, but it's still my opinion that it's sour grapes for being rejected.

three seven
10-02-2005, 06:36 PM
I can only assume one of three things:

1) You've read and understood what everyone's said but you've chosen to ignore it and demonstrate your unparallelled wisdom and experience by calling everyone else an idiot.

2) You've read the words that support your argument and ignored the rest.

3) You're Uwe Stender('s associate).

Based on your comments in the PA thread (http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showpost.php?p=301370&postcount=23445), I'm leaning towards the first option.

Sakamonda
10-02-2005, 06:45 PM
Three Seven, I would fall under category:

4) An intelligent, experienced, independent-thinking professional whose opinion just happens to be different from yours.

By the way, Three Seven, I _never_ called anyone an idiot. But _you_ just did. I never engaged in personal attacks on people whose opinions are different from my own. But _you_ just did.

I stand by my opinions, and anyone is free to disagree with me. But I don't engage in personal attacks, and I never called anyone any names, so I don't see why anyone else has to.

Sakamonda
10-02-2005, 06:47 PM
By the way Three Seven, the fact that you bring up my comments on the PA thread as being some kind of problem leads me to believe you are a PA author? Am I right?

three seven
10-02-2005, 07:23 PM
An intelligent, experienced, independent-thinking professionalProfessional what, exactly?


whose opinion just happens to be different from yours.That I know considerably more about at least one case in point than you do is not an opinion, it's a fact.


I _never_ called anyone an idiot. But _you_ just did. I never engaged in personal attacks on people whose opinions are different from my own. But _you_ just did.If you'd like to show me where I called someone an idiot, I'll review it. And I'm not personally attacking you over a difference of opinion. My issue with you has nothing to do with your opinion of Uwe Stender - I'm personally attacking you for your high-and-mighty attitude and your refusal to listen to what you're being told.


I never called anyone any namesNo, I do beg your pardon - you merely alluded to their bitterness, patronised them with your assumed greater knowledge and dismissed their actions as immature having deliberately misinterpreted them to suit your own agenda.


By the way Three Seven, the fact that you bring up my comments on the PA thread as being some kind of problem leads me to believe you are a PA author? Am I right?No, you're not. See a pattern yet?

I referred to your PA comments purely as further illustration of your derisive attitude towards this community and its members. And yet again, you've drawn conclusions without reference to the facts.

Kasey Mackenzie
10-02-2005, 07:29 PM
Maybe you all could move the irrelevant bits to PM's or Take it Outside...This really seems to be degenerating from its original purpose.

Sakamonda
10-02-2005, 07:40 PM
[QUOTE=three seven]Professional what, exactly?

---Professional writer. As in, I earn my living---a good living, mind you---exclusively by writing. (As a staffer and freelancer for publications and research institutions at present; hopefully for books at a future time.)

your refusal to listen to what you're being told.

---Okay, so now this is a matter of me not listening to direct orders being given to me by you? Sorry, I don't recall being at your beck and call, Three Seven. Now who's high and mighty?

You also called someone an idiot by _deliberately_ misquoting me as having called someone an idiot in your above post, and also by _deliberately_ misquoting me as someone who has called someone petty names. The fact that you now acknowledge you were wrong in both instances further illustrates my point.

My mother told me once when I was five that "whenever you point your finger at someone, there are three fingers pointing back at you". I think that is an appropriate observation to make here.

That said, you are certainly welcome to disagree with me on my opinions on TriadaUS. And any writer has the choice to query/not query any agent that they want, or if representation is offered, to sign/not sign with that agent based on their experiences during the submission process. That's fine and dandy. Not every agent is right for every author, and the agent/client relationship is a highly personal one that should be the right "fit" between the two----and as in every kind of relationship out there, not everyone is going to "fit" together perfectly. I just don't think it's appropriate to disparage an agent whose only offense in the whole scheme of things is rejecting someone, or having different opinions on a writer's work from the writer's own opinion about him/her self, or perhaps not being the right "fit" for that author. None of these things merit an agency being "bad". It's not like TriadaUS is a scam agency bilking poor suckers out of money or running a sham vanity press or something. They are a legitimate agency running a legitimate business, and they do have documented sales to royalty-paying publishers within about a year of opening their agency---and therefore are on track to becoming a solid agency in years to come. I challenge anyone to opin otherwise, regardless of whether they would choose to work with this agency themselves.

saraht
10-02-2005, 07:42 PM
Today, 10:47 AM #48
Sakamonda said:
I stand by my comments. I just have a hard time sympathizing with people who whine about rejections, when rejections are a daily occurrence in any serious writer's life. There just isn't much in most of the posters' comments to make me think it's more than that---whining. If they want to post more information to the contrary, it's their prerogative to do so---or not. But as it stands now, that's my opinion. Anyone is free to disagree with me, but it's still my opinion that it's sour grapes for being rejected.



I SAY:

You sound as if you know all there is to know about every one here when actually you don’t know jack.

I’ve read your posts and have only one question for you. Why are you so angry?

Another thing, why should it matter to you who signs with what agent and what agent don’t or won’t sign a writer? Does any of this effect you? Why aren’t you happy that you have signed with Uwe? Better yet, how many books has he gotten published for those writers he has signed? From what I have read he has not been successful in getting anything published. Does this make him a bad agent? No, in my opinion it does not, just not a very successful one.

So, in closing my one and only comment on this thread, if you don’t like what you’re reading on this thread, then stop reading it and go to another thread. And for goodness sakes, get happy!

Violet

Sakamonda
10-02-2005, 07:48 PM
For the record, Violet, I am very happy with my representation. Why do you think I defend him so ravenously? He has been doing a bang-up job getting my book in front of top editors, and he is a professional and a gentleman to boot.

What I am unhappy about are some of the unreasonable attacks made by disgruntled (read: oft-rejected) authors on my agent simply because he is a newer one.

J. Y. Moore
10-02-2005, 07:48 PM
Maybe you all could move the irrelevant bits to PM's or Take it Outside...This really seems to be degenerating from its original purpose.

Ditto :flag: !

three seven
10-02-2005, 07:51 PM
Okay, so now this is a matter of me not listening to direct orders being given to me by you? Sorry, I don't recall being at your beck and call, Three Seven. Now who's high and mighty?For the love of Christ, NO. You're not listening to what your other members have said about their experiences with this agency. You're refusing to acknowledge that others may have had bad experiences with them, choosing rather to attribute their discontent to a mere rejection. Will you STOP twisting my words to suit your own agenda.


You also called someone an idiot by _deliberately_ misquoting me as having called someone an idiot in your above post, and also by _deliberately_ misquoting me as someone who has called someone petty names. The fact that you now acknowledge you were wrong in both instances further illustrates my point.I neither quoted you nor deliberately misquoted you. Everything I said about this in my last post was accurate. AGAIN, you're responding without reading.


That said, you are certainly welcome to disagree with me on my opinions on TriadaUS. And there you go AGAIN. I have not expressed an opinion about this agency. The ONLY opinion I've expressed is the opinion that you're being deliberately difficult and inflammatory. You can tell me you're right until you're blue in the face, but it won't change the fact that you're disrespecting everybody here. This is helping neither your credibility nor your welcome.

Perks
10-02-2005, 08:00 PM
I said I was done. I guess I lied. Sakamonda, I cannot fathom how you could still assert that I was merely whining about having been rejected. Just as I cannot prove that my motivation is other, you have no proof that your experience with TriadaUS has been beneficial and wonderful for you. I am taking you at your word and have congratulated you on it.

It is insulting that you would insist that my word is not of the same value. My experience with TriadaUS was simply different from yours. This is the forum to share that. I cannot state any more plainly that the ultimate rejection was not a problem. My experience ended up being an overly dramatic saga, which Uwe and I discussed and resolved. In fairness and appreciation for the positive aspects of my dealings with Uwe and TriadaUS, my comments were meant only to caution PurpleLady to keep grounded. Submissions, particularly early on before rejection callouses form, can be nerve-wracking. This is what inspired my original post. If you refuse to acknowledge that, then yes, you are attacking me.

I think we have gotten your point that you are overwhelmingly impressed with your agent. That is wonderful and you have every right, even somewhat of an obligation, to sing his praises here. A few of us had episodes with that same agent that gave us pause of not such an enthusiastic sort. So, net score for Uwe and TriadaUS seems about what one might expect for a new agent and agency.

rekirts
10-02-2005, 08:14 PM
So, net score for Uwe and TriadaUS seems about what one might expect for a new agent and agency.

As an impartial observer, that's what I get out of this exchange when you distill out the emotion.

It's best not to make assumptions beyond what is stated in posts and then make replies based only on those assumptions. We don't know what exactly occurred between this agency and the authors who weren't satisified, and it's out of line to refer to them as "disgruntled (read oft-rejected)" when we know no such thing.

Aconite
10-02-2005, 08:31 PM
I am still waiting for my novel to sell, but he has been able to get my novel manuscript in front of editors at numerous big imprints----Broadway, St. Martins, Pocket, Llewyllen, Atria, Red Dress Ink, and Kensington, to name a few.
I'm still trying to figure out what kind of novel would be a suitable fit for Llewellyn, St. Martin's, and Red Dress Ink.

dragonjax
10-02-2005, 08:54 PM
It would appear that I misread Dragonjax's earlier post. Sorry about that and thank you for clarifying.
Apology accepted, Sak. :)

PurpleLady
10-03-2005, 03:45 AM
Victoria, while I think all the work that Writer Beware does is TERRIFIC, I am surprised that you would take issue with the fact that any agency uses associates to evaluate manuscripts, when virtually all agencies of any size do this; whether to process the large volumes of slush or to manage certain genres. I know in my agent search, 90% of the agencies I queried used associates for the first couple levels of the selection process (queries, partials, even the first reads on fulls). If it's Writer Beware's policy to question the use of associate agents, then most literary agencies would be considered bad, wouldn't they?

Sakamonda - I don't think this is the issue here. The issue is qualified associate. In the case of an earlier post, the author was told to inflate his manuscript and the associate questioned the overuse (3 times) of a certain word. If someone had read the complete manuscript, with a true editor's eye, they would make more useful comments than those.

Birol
10-03-2005, 03:46 AM
I'm still trying to figure out what kind of novel would be a suitable fit for Llewellyn, St. Martin's, and Red Dress Ink.

If I'm correct about Sakamonda's identity and literary credits, her WIP is heavily cross-genre and would have elements that would appeal to each of those markets, though it probably does not solidly fit into any one of them. Although I have not read her WIP, based upon the descriptions I have found of it online, the genre that claims it will largely be a marketing decision.


For the rest, I think everyone needs to take a step back and a deep breath before responding further on this thread.

Thanks.

victoriastrauss
10-03-2005, 06:49 PM
I'm closing this thread TEMPORARILY to give everyone time to catch their breath and cool down.

- Victoria

victoriastrauss
10-26-2005, 02:15 AM
Unlocking, as promised.

- Victoria

Liam Jackson
10-26-2005, 02:46 AM
I'm still trying to figure out what kind of novel would be a suitable fit for Llewellyn, St. Martin's, and Red Dress Ink.

I can't speak to the needs of Llewellyn or Red Dress Ink, but St. Martin's is highly diversified. Genres range from Robert Ludlum's bestselling techno-thriller,Ambler Warning, to mainstream heart-tuggers like The Christmas Shoes by Donna VanLiere.

The also have the Thomas Dunne imprint that publishes dark fantasy, supernatural, and horror themes.

Nice folks at St. Martin's.

Sakamonda
10-28-2005, 11:57 PM
TriadaUS has sold another book since this thread was closed. Dr. Stender seems well on his way.

Aconite
10-29-2005, 12:07 AM
Sakamonda: Title? Author? Publisher?

Sakamonda
10-29-2005, 01:10 AM
Deal info is posted on the agent's wbsite (www.triadaus.com (http://www.triadaus.com)) and is also available on PublishersMarketplace.com under their Deals section.

PurpleLady
10-29-2005, 03:28 AM
TriadaUS has sold another book since this thread was closed. Dr. Stender seems well on his way.
How many books has he found publishers for so far?

dragonjax
10-29-2005, 05:41 PM
I believe he has placed two nonfiction works so far.

Sakamonda
10-29-2005, 06:53 PM
That is correct, Dragonjax. He's also recently landed a few minor celebrities as clients.

stormie
10-29-2005, 07:55 PM
Here I go, jumping in.

It doesn't seem anyone is against TriadaUS or the agent Uwe. What it seems is that there is a problem with his associate. The associate is the one who seems to respond to mss. non-professionally, with comments that aren't along the lines of what the submitted mss. is all about.

Now I leave....:gone:

victoriastrauss
10-29-2005, 08:03 PM
I think we've discussed the associate thing quite thoroughly enough already...Unless someone is able to contribute new information, I'd like to see this issue rest for the moment. Thanks, all.

- Victoria

triceretops
11-24-2005, 10:44 AM
Well, from what I can contribute I will say that Uwe responed to my hard copy query via email with a very personal touch and quite a sense of humor. He also called me long distance, but got hold of the message on the phone and decided not to record a message. I found him one of the more accomodating and courteous agents, and he indicates that he's trying very hard to place good material with all of the majors, and seems to be attending every conference and event in the industry to push his roster. The guy's worn his legs out trying to establish himself in an industry that is already in serious glut with agents and new writers.

He's now made three sales, and is gaining legs--hitting his stride. Granted, they are non-fiction titles, and he has yet to make a fiction sale, although I think he might need to update his website once again.

He requested my "manuscript" without any particulars, and I don't know what to think of this--whether it was for the synop and a partial, or for the full. I'll have to get back with him and get this clarified. I'll let you know.

As far as an associate or reader for an agency, I think I own the hell ribbon for having three of my books lanquish in Richard Curtis's basement for a period of 1 1/2 years with NO responses, updates, call-backs, or encouragement. So it can certainly go both ways in this business--and Curtis is no small hitter in the sf and fantasy field.

I'd personally like to go with a newer agent who's hungry like the wolf, and will pull out all stops to get me reviewed somewhere--anywhere for gawd's sakes.

Just my humble.

Tri

Sakamonda
11-24-2005, 10:43 PM
My original post on this got erased in the server rollover, but I just wanted to post that it seems Uwe uses several different associates to assist in reading manuscripts. Although I have not dealt directly with her, he is using an associate to copyedit my latest ms. (contemporary romance) who has proven she is more than savvy when it comes to catching inconsistencies and typos that had passed me and my entire beta-reader team (all professional writer/editors) by.

Uwe has indeed gotten my first novel in front of editors at several of the major pubs. We haven't made the sale of that book yet (it is cross-genre and proving difficult to move in this difficult fiction market) but my second novel will likely be easier since it is straightforward category romance. The guy just busts his butt constantly. He is definitely starting to hit his stride as he makes more sales.

triceretops
11-24-2005, 11:09 PM
Thanks for your input Sakomonda. Uwe just emailed me this morning and verified that he would like the whole manuscript. Now that's pretty heavy initiative when you consider that I only sent him a QUERY. Said he was intrigued by the query, so why not send the full. Again, he was humorous and conversational and so swift with replies it blew my doors off. I was immediately struck by liking this agent as a person first--and that's exactly what this business is--a person to person relationship that involves business.

So, I for one, would be grateful to jump on his roster and go along for the ride. If it doesn't work out, I'll certainly remember him as the most fearless and congenial agent I've known, and I wouldn't have any problems recommending him to a paranoid or skittish writer. He has a calming effect right from the gate.

Tri

Sakamonda
11-25-2005, 07:30 PM
Good luck with that, Triceratops. What genre of fiction is it in?

triceretops
11-26-2005, 12:34 AM
Hi, Sakamonda. Planet Janitor is an off-world science fiction thriller that is a cross between Star Ship Troopers and Robinson Crusoe on Mars--that's how I explained it to Uwe, anyway. I've never quite had such a positive reaction like that, unless this is the type of book that he and his associates like to read a lot. I dunno.

I was about to ask you the same question. Perhaps you are one of the fiction authors listed, and do you also have an excerpt?

The only problem that MIGHT be perceived with this agency is that Uwe is the president and front man, who is very personable in the initial contacts. Then when your book is handed over to a reader/sub-agent, and negative comments or a rejection comes back, Uwe probably relays this news in a polite way, serving as the buffer or the apologist. I can see something like this possibly happening. For instance, you start off with Uwe, thinking that he will be the one actually reading and evaluating, but he has to hand the submission off to a reader because he is involved with all the heavy promotions, connections, conference and events attendence. You know, the figurehead stuff?

So, I could immediately see where one's feelings might be hurt in not dealing directly with him through the entire process. This is quite normal and happens all the time in agencies--nothing new. I'm certainly impressed with Uwe, and like my association with him already. The thing I notice is that I would most likely regret losing him as a friend, like a soldier buddy dying in the trenches. I'm just guessing, mind you, but I have a gut feeling that there is a psychological trama associated with a split that might happen this way.

Perhaps one could accuse him of being overly nice (if that's possible), and finding out that he is actually not involved at all in the critique process, thus when the hammer falls, it's that much more devastating.

Sorry to over-think this issue, but I think I see what's going on, and that's only my opinion.

Tri

Sakamonda
11-26-2005, 02:15 AM
I think the level at which Uwe gets involved in reviewing manuscripts depends on the genre of the book. My first novel (the one that he signed me for) he handled everything himself. My second novel, a category romance, he read himself but also is using a "reader associate" for copyediting. I think he does pretty much everything himself for certain genres of fiction as well as most nonfiction. The genre where I think he farms it out the most is science fiction (perhaps he feels the need for outside expertise more in that genre, I don't know). He is courteous and professional at all times, much more so than most other agents I have encountered. I think the bottom line is, regardless of what happened with the people on this thread who were complaining about him, they were rejected, and they are bitter at that rejection. I don't really think it has anything to do with Uwe or his associates personally or professionally.

Perks
11-26-2005, 05:17 AM
I think the bottom line is, regardless of what happened with the people on this thread who were complaining about him, they were rejected, and they are bitter at that rejection. I don't really think it has anything to do with Uwe or his associates personally or professionally.

We're going to do this again, are we?

I'll ask you you once again not to discount other member's opinions and experiences that are just as valid as your own. If you're going to bait me, why don't you do it with the sale of your book, not the incessant questioning of my motives. At least it would be a solid point to make, rather than snide commentary which you have worked about to death in here.

Triceretops, there has been some time between our earlier complaints and your dealings with TriadaUS. Hopefully, the kinks and bugs that were problems have been erased with sales experience. I think Uwe is terrific and as I have stated before, wish him much success.

triceretops
11-26-2005, 09:08 AM
Well, I've known Perks for a long time and I don't think she is "curl-toed" because of a rejection--this happened some time ago and it's quite possible that there was an associate/reader who was put in a position in where their skills were lacking. We always have to keep in mind that the writer has rights of refusal too, and that we are not obligated to re-write complete manuscripts at the whim of another, unless we feel that those additions, subtractions, and changes are truly going to improve the script. This has to do with the "fit" issue. Most writers know instinctively when an associate is on the same page with them, then there are others that have no clue as to why suggestions are being made. So this can go either way in a heartbeat.

One problem that would solve this issue would be if Uwe runs bios of his associates on his web page--the "agency players." I've seen this done with a lot of agencies, and this is where you can discover backgrounds, likes, dislikes, and genre specialists. Uwe, himself, has an extensive background and education in the arts and literature--he almost looks over-qualified in some respects, and this can only help him in the final decision making process. However, I'd love to see his "players" just out of curiosity just to know who I MIGHT be dealing with in future negotiations. Then again, there is certainly a privacy issue to contend with--some sub-agents don't want any spam or are fearful of attacks and reprisals.

Now, I did not know that Uwe gets actively involved, and this is very nice to hear. Although I might take in on the chin since he farms out SF--my only hope would be that he sees it first, or enough of it to form a solid opinion. All books go through a small panal of individuals anyway, unless it's a one woman/man operation. The majority vote counts for acceptance or denial, and rarely does the president overide or veto the popular vote.

In any event, I'll revisit this thread and give my impressions as best as I can while going through this process. I'll attempt it with a detached and unbiased viewpoint, if I can distance myself from any personal impressions.

Best to all,

Tri

victoriastrauss
11-26-2005, 11:25 PM
Do y'all want me to close this thread again?

I will if I have to.

Tri, your observations as you go through this process will be welcome.

- Victoria

Sakamonda
11-27-2005, 08:11 PM
I meant no offense to anyone. I was merely providing observations in response to Tri's queries based on my interactions with Uwe and his associate over the past year. They are overwhelmingingly positive. I hope Tri has a similar experience.

victoriastrauss
11-27-2005, 10:05 PM
Sakamonda, you reiterated the statement you made earlier in the thread--that the people who reported negative experiences with the agency did so out of bitterness because they'd been rejected. This is untrue; it's also inflammatory, as evidenced by Perks's response. Since this fight has already been fought here, in almost identical terms and with you as a prime participant, I wish you had not felt it necessary to dredge up the issue yet again.

I understand that you're sticking up for an agent you have high regard for. That's great, and I welcome any information you want to provide about the agency itself--such as letting us know about new sales. But please, let's leave the old arguments behind.

- Victoria

Sakamonda
11-27-2005, 10:45 PM
Acknolwedged and understood, Victoria. Thanks for all the work you do to moderate the boards. I will be happy to keep folks posted here on my novel sales. Uwe does a pretty good job of posting his new sales on PM and his own site as well.

triceretops
11-27-2005, 10:58 PM
I'm glad we're at peace here--remember that all writers are the most beautiful people in the world, and we are are own support team.

I too will let y'all know how my dealings with Uwe go. I have to quickly revise my manuscript with a third polish before I send it in to him and he won't be back until Monday, so I have some time and am just about finished with it. Now I have to contend with my brand new Lexmark that is throwing cartridge jams at me so I'm in a blind panic about how to remedy that. Like my novel plot, it's just one damn thing after another.

Tri

three seven
11-27-2005, 11:04 PM
Now I have to contend with my brand new Lexmark that is throwing cartridge jams at me so I'm in a blind panic about how to remedy that.Ok, obvious question: Surely it's under warranty?

triceretops
11-27-2005, 11:12 PM
Yes, Three, it is. I've just been studying the online manual for it. It appears that I have to shut everything down--disconnect, then go through the hookup process again, which include the primary cartridge alignment "test" that serves as a default setting. I should also disengage the ink cartridges, then snap them back into their cradles again while the power is on, so this shows a clean start up mode. I think I'll have it solved in two days or so before I have to print and send.

Tri

Grampa Joe
12-08-2005, 08:41 PM
My very first post on the Water Cooler. Wrote one book, 344 pp. 85,000 words. After reading all the good & bad about Uwe, I decided to send him a query about my POD true crime, The Murder of Andrew Sigler. I'll keep y'all up-to-date on my success or lack of same with Uwe.

vipersmile
12-08-2005, 09:34 PM
Uwe has requested my third novel.

I'll keep you updated.

Eric-

James D. Macdonald
12-08-2005, 10:09 PM
Best of luck to you.

triceretops
12-09-2005, 12:07 AM
Great, Vipersmile. He asked me for my second and I'll be sending it in the next day or so. It looks like were hanging out with the same agent and book publisher too--Black Death. Good luck to both of us.

Tri

Sakamonda
12-09-2005, 05:28 AM
Good luck!

Grampa Joe
12-09-2005, 06:28 PM
My very first post on the Water Cooler. Wrote one book, 344 pp. 85,000 words. After reading all the good & bad about Uwe, I decided to send him a query about my POD true crime, The Murder of Andrew Sigler. I'll keep y'all up-to-date on my success or lack of same with Uwe.
I got an email rejection from Dr. Stender. At least he had the courtesy to reply to my email. Said it was not what he was looking for at this time. I guess he meant true crime. So, it is back to the drawing board.

The Scribbler
12-09-2005, 06:35 PM
I think Mr. Stender needs to clarify a little better on just what it is that he is after. After looking through this thread it seems that quite a few people have received the same message.

Kate Nepveu
12-09-2005, 08:01 PM
I believe that "not what we're looking for at this time" is the generally-accepted polite way of saying "no thanks" among agents, and that's all absent further information.

Sakamonda
12-09-2005, 08:49 PM
What Dr. Stender is currently looking for is stated on his website, as follows:

"We are looking for nonfiction, especially how to and pop culture and strong fiction projects!" (from his rolling "News" blurb)

Fiction: "We are interested in all kinds of commercial fiction, including thrillers, mysteries, children's, romance, ethnic, and science fiction. We are also interested in literary fiction, but only if it has a strong narrative."

Nonfiction: "We are interested in education, current affairs, health, psychology, cookbooks, travel books, pop-culture, sports, adventure, true crime, biography and memoir. TriadaUS is also open to reviewing other genres and topics, as long as the material is for a trade or general audience and not scholarly."

I know he is overstocked on fiction right now, so he is more likely to show interest in nonfiction.

Grampa Joe
12-09-2005, 11:41 PM
True Crime certainly is something he is looking for. What a shame he won't even give my book a look-see. I thought I had written a decent query, too. I even offered him a freebie.
Could it be that I had it published as a POD by a small press? I own all rights, so I can turn the book over to whomever I want.
Oh, well. I've been rejected by some of the best, and I'll keep on plugging! :Sun:

DaveKuzminski
12-09-2005, 11:45 PM
Yep, Grampa Joe, that sounds like it's now a reprint.

Sakamonda
12-10-2005, 12:03 AM
Grampa Joe, most legit agents will reject POD books on principle, because commericial publishers will also reject them on principle. The only exception is if you managed to sell 5,000 or more copies of your POD, which would be roughly exquivalent to the number of copies a debut author sells with a traditional publisher. Dr. Stender just did what any other agent would have done with a POD.

James D. Macdonald
12-10-2005, 01:06 AM
Sometimes 5,000 sales isn't good enough -- the publisher may figure that the book has already sold all the copies it's going to. I've also heard 10,000+ as a number that will get you picked up after self-publication.

It's a hard road, this writing. Previous publication with a POD may label your book "proven failure" based on sales numbers.

Bookstores are important to publishers. Bookstores base their orders on the author's previous sales history. An author who sold 500 or a thousand books may not get big pre-orders, which may kill a book's chances.

It's a dance. Agents know the steps.

My suggestion: Write a new book. Sell it. Piggyback a reprint of your current work onto the sales of that new work.

Uwe
12-10-2005, 05:41 AM
I just read your message.
I will admit that on days where I receive over 80 queries via email and snail mail, I will sometimes revert to the "not right for me at this time" or "not what I am looking for right now."

While your query was well written and the topic interesting, in nonfiction, if I am signing True Crime, I am looking for a more high profile project than the one you presented. My editorial contacts are looking for "national platform" for (either) author and/or project so if you wrote me, for instance, about the Phil Spector case, I would have asked to see the proposal. This is not a value judgment on you or your project, I just don't think I can sell that particular project. (And it might be the perfect project for another agent or another time.)

As far as what I am looking for: great fiction of pretty much any genre and in nonfiction I am looking for "national platform" projects of all kinds and excellent how-to and self-help. I am more open to nonfiction at this very time (although memoirs or narrative nonfiction should be of the "national" platform variety, but I will always take a look at a fiction project where the query "blows me away" (whatever that means in this subjective field).
Best,
Uwe

vipersmile
12-10-2005, 06:05 PM
Uwe. I think you're doing a great thing, I've said before, at least when you give me the rejection in about two weeks from now after reading my vampire submission it won't feel like I'm being burned alive at the stake. I said earlier that I can't wait to be shot down in flames by you because of your constructive critiscism and ability to tell aspiring writers why the particular's aren't there.

I have always been this positive, yes...yes I have.

More agents should be like you, buisness like, precise and with humor.

And for anyone else reading this, I recommend Dr. Stender. His canter and ability to respond in a timely fashion more than make up for any lack in trust or judgement.

The truth sometimes hurts but it is necessary to explore the inner chambers of our creative abilities and assess the difference between opinions,facts, and what's needed in today's market.

triceretops
12-10-2005, 06:19 PM
I like the personal touch too. TriadaUS is on top of their game when responding to each and every email in a timely and polite fashion. Out of all my agent rejections recently, 65% of them were Non-Responders, when in fact, most of them declared that they got ahold of the writer, either way. This is totally distressing since I don't know if I can cross them off my list or what.

Tri

Grampa Joe
12-13-2005, 12:45 AM
Thanks for the answers. I guess I'll take your advise and write another book, keep selling the POD, and, perhaps, somebody will pick up the movie rights! It's another "Fargo". :hooray:

vipersmile
12-13-2005, 02:18 AM
I LOOOOOOOOOVE wood chippers!


Them bones them bones them bones, raining across the lakewater.

Vomaxx
12-13-2005, 02:56 AM
I recommend Dr. Stender. His canter ... makes up for any lack in trust or judgement.

He trots and gallops pretty well, too. :)

vipersmile
12-13-2005, 05:07 AM
yes he does.

LucyEllenH
12-26-2005, 05:23 AM
Latest update on Uwe Stender/TriadaUS:

Looking for an agent and running across his site in the course of my research, my take was that he's new, hungry, and friendly. I ran into a problem with the fine print on his site though. Although he says he prefers email queries and seems to take pride in how fast his turnaround time is and how much he respects the writers' time, his submission guidelines say that he only responds to email queries if he's interested. From his site:

If we haven't responded after two weeks, we are either not interested in the material or have not received the email.

He doesn't seem to realize that if he doesn't respond, we have no way of knowing which of those two things is the case. Ordinarily that policy (no response if not interested) makes me pass on submitting, but in this case I'm sending him a snail mail query with a PS pointing out this discrepancy, figuring that his response (if any) will be revealing. I'll keep you posted.

BTW: The crawl on his sidebar now talks about 3 sales of books slated for publication in 2006 and 2007. Can't tell if they're the only ones or just the recent ones. FWIW he has what appears to be a client list containing 28 names.

triceretops
12-26-2005, 06:57 AM
Hi, Lucy.

Uwe just took me on about thirty minutes ago, and is going to request rewrites. Anyway, I noticed the email thing too, and my computer browser was acting up at the time, so I sent a hard-copy query with appologies. He called me on the phone and requested the full hard-copy manuscript, which was a total shock. He read the book within six days and said he liked it, so I'm to call him tommorow with the idea of minor revision ideas and some grammar problems.

This is the fastest turn around time I have ever had for an agent reply, submission and read out of 95 submissions. Also the most personable. He's new, hungry, and totally aggresive, knowing that it is not easy to join this industry. He has a great attitude and aspires to follow within AAR guidelines.

He's made about 4 major non-fic sales. I haven't heard any fiction sales yet, and he's still buidling a stable of writers. Could be that his site needs an update. Fiction will be the most difficult break-through for him as it is for any new agency, but once he begins to make sales, he'll find his stride, I'm sure.

His background and education impressed me. In fact the PHD in literature kind of frightened me, because I knew he would catch every nusiance in my script...and guess what? He nailed over 200 errors. That means he wants the best from me, and that's the way I like to work.

Tri

LucyEllenH
12-26-2005, 04:21 PM
Hi, Tri;

Your description of Uwe sounds about what I've gleaned from his site and other feedback, which is why the "no response if uninterested" seems so out of character. Usually it's a deal-breaker for me, and I won't even submit to someone with any form of "non-response" as a matter of policy.

Other concerns earlier on this thread center on his relative his slow start in making sales. (Others seem unimpressed with 4 sales since April 2004.)
As it happens, my book is a children's book, which he says he's also looking for, but which seems to be rather a specialized area, so we shall see what, if anything, he does with it. I also enclosed all 5 pages of the MS with my query, so the thing should take a whopping 2 minutes to read, which puts a different spin on reading/re-writing.

I'm not as frightened (impressed?) with the PhD, mainly because I have a more than passing familiarity with academe, including a pretty realistic idea of what a PhD really does (and doesn't) mean.

But believe me, no one knows better than I what's involved in starting up and building a business. Hungry is good, which is why I'm looking forward to hearing from him.

dragonjax
12-26-2005, 04:46 PM
Hey...congratulations, Tri!!!

triceretops
12-26-2005, 11:03 PM
Lucy, I can only agree about the non-responding part of the equation. I'm one of the loudest advocates against it on this board. My email responses have been terrible, and it might be due in part to my shotgun methology. Yet I have experimented and taken my time to personalize each email just recently, and even that has not worked to my satisfaction. There have been dozens of agents that do not respond back to me, while others on this board have gotten at least the negative form email back from the same agents, and vice versa, so it looks like it is some kind of a crap shoot. No sour grapes here, it's just that I cannot properly track submissions this way, and have no idea if my subs have been lost to cyberspace or have indeed been deleted for non-interest.

Not only that, how am I to know if webistes have not been udated and policy changes have occured for the sub process? How am I to know if a certain agency has just filled their roster (recently) and is no longer taking queries. Just one example, I had to find out through the rumor mill that one agent I was after did not taking off-planet science ficton, and there was no mention of this in the Writer's Market or on their website. All they would have had to do was tell me. There are many little quirks like this that could be cleared up if simply the agent or editor would type a sentence and respond back. Then said agent wouldn't ever have to deal with me again. NOT FOR ME.

There's a caveat to this: I'm new to the internet (11 months), but I'm not new to being publishing multiple times. So perhaps I'm over-reacting on this. But I simply see this as some form of "cyber genocide" where we are getting the boot en masse, and this trend, if it continues and widens, would greatly disturb me. Just my thoughts.
Tri

Sassenach
12-26-2005, 11:10 PM
I follow up once. If I receive no response, it's obvious there's no interest.

LucyEllenH
12-27-2005, 01:26 AM
I follow up once. If I receive no response, it's obvious there's no interest.
Sounds like a reasonable policy, though if the first message disappeared into cyberspace, there's as much reason to suspect that a second email (sent to/from the same addresses) met with the same fate as that the party is uninterested.

I just think it's rude not to respond at all. It's the principle of the thing to me.

Sassenach
12-27-2005, 02:32 AM
Sounds like a reasonable policy, though if the first message disappeared into cyberspace, there's as much reason to suspect that a second email (sent to/from the same addresses) met with the same fate as that the party is uninterested.

I just think it's rude not to respond at all. It's the principle of the thing to me.

Whenever I send a message to the wrong address, it bounces back to me. It rarely disappears.

Yep, it's rude, but the way it is.

LucyEllenH
12-27-2005, 04:15 AM
Yep, it's rude, but the way it is.
Doesn't mean I have to participate. Rudeness generally flourishes only where it's tolerated.

The Scribbler
12-28-2005, 08:49 PM
I wouldnt say it is rude, but I do think it is a tad unprofessional. I know agencies received hundreds if not thousands of queries but honestly how long would it take to shoot an email out that said "No Thanks". That way writers are not out there hanging in limbo.

Aconite
12-28-2005, 11:07 PM
Miss Snark (http://misssnark.blogspot.com/), who in her mundane identity is said to be a NY single-person literary agency (AAR member), agrees that it's rude for agents not to reply to submissions.

Uwe
12-28-2005, 11:31 PM
I respond to ALL emails or snail mails (if the SASE is included.)
Since I do not respond to mass produced or tool produced emails (like scriptblaster...I don't even read them) I had a line on my website that stated that we won't respond unless interested (since I am not interested in scriptblaster mass submissions).

Thanks for pointing out the potential ambiguity of that statement, I have removed it from the submission pages.

I have ALWAYS responded to every message addressed to me I received (barring it being caught in a spam filter which might happen on occasion!) and will CONTINUE to do so. I take pride in that and consider it a minimum level of courtesy.

I hope this clarifies that particular point. There are many agencies, however, who do not always respond and I would appreciate it if this particular discussion about responding or not would be continued elsewhere as it does not represent TriadaUS' policy. We ALWAYS respond.
Best wishes and a great 2006 to all,
Uwe

DaveKuzminski
12-29-2005, 12:07 AM
I think it would be a good idea for a moderator to separate this topic into two different threads.

LucyEllenH
12-29-2005, 04:25 AM
Hi, Uwe;

Thanks for the clarification, including your recognition of the ambiguity of the statement in your guidelines. I thought it seemed out of character from the rest of the impression you were trying to project.

Having read this whole thread, I agree there's been a lot of extraneous discussion (some rather *heated*) that has nothing to do with TriadaUS. I'm not sure how much dividing it up would help (having made my point about repsonses and having Uwe agree, as I suspected he would), but that's why Gd made moderators.

Uwe: you should be getting my snail mail query shortly (SASE included http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/smilies/smile.gif ) but please ignore the PS. Thank you for fixing the line on your website. Now if you want to fix that comma-splice/run-on sentence at the beginning of that paragraph...

/signed/
The Phantom Proofreader

triceretops
12-29-2005, 02:06 PM
Yes, we got off the ball there. In my diatribe, I was implying about all the other past agents in my inventory. TriadaUS is kind of a fresh breeze for a change. Uwe is exacting, honest, and precise in detailed observations. He could have and should have tossed my manuscript for all of the grammatical snafus, which were way over what he tolerates. Instead he took endless hours out of his time to flag them All and still remained cheery about the whole thing. No agent has ever done that for me, and I can tell you one thing...what does a manuscript copy-edit cost for a 400-page book? From 50 cents on up to a couple of bucks a page! So I've learned a lesson here--make damn sure the product is bullet proof before it ever goes out. I went over mine four times, when it should have been eight times. These weren't simple comma and period mistakes--I left out over 150 WORDS, for god's sakes. So if you send him something, Please, don't do what I did. It wasn't fair to him. He's not a copy-editor, he's got sales to make and people to meet.

By contrast let me give you the low-down on one the largest, most prestigious agencies that I belonged to from 1988 to 1990. Of course I had one of the sub-agents, and this guy makes Virginia Kidd look like a lemonade stand. They loved three of my books, but really never had the time to even suggest changes that would have improved them. I got lost in the shuffle, and ended up talked to the least about anything. They were always too busy. Well they informed me that they sent one of my books to Hollywood straight away. The director John Badham and the producers, the Cohen Brothers, fell in love with the manuscript because it was so visual. So they prepared for an option. Two weeks later I get the news that my book is too similar to Michael Crihton's (sp?) Jurassic Park, and that there was a rumor that Spielberg was going to jump on the JP book. So my book, Dinothon, was rolled over and used for a door stop until they said, "the fervor dies down." Guess what? The JP fervor never died down.

Here's the clincher: Dinothon was about piloted, robotic dinosaurs in the year 2035, and it was a 500-page demolition battle to the death of the giant machines over a 48-hour period.

What in the Chuck Dickens did my book have in common with JP? Do you see it? Am I mad yet? Nope. I guess I can understand a film marketing problem with it. Although you'd really have to spell that one out for me.

I got hurt and dispondent, when for the next two years they didn't even attempt to sell it as a paperback. As diverse as the two books were, Jurassic Park somehow put the pox on me. It was then that I broke all my pencils, burned every manuscript I had, and sold my computer, having never wanting to deal with writing again. My other books lanquished on their desks also, with no mention of letters of submission. And this man was the God of science fiction agents.

I came back to re-break back into the industry just 11 months ago after this long hiatus with three new books ready to go. Moral of the story: There is something to be said about a smaller or newer agency that doesn't cringe when they hear your voice on the phone. There's something to be said about a friendly voice, who enjoys your company, and you actually get a chance to find out about them, just like they were a new neighbor. There's something to be said about the personal touch nowadays that's been lost immeasurably in the shuffle of time-cramming and go-go get em' out of the way mentality.

I never want to fall into the great fanny crack of life again when it comes to an agency or publisher. I'd like just once to stand upon a firm buttock and look around, down, and at eye level like everybody else. I only want just a smidgen of a chance to be reconized, just once, and then I won't bother you any more. It's every writer's "now I lay me down to sleep" prayer that one day, somehow and somewhere, somebody gives you acknowledgment for a job well done and some unsolicited praise. And that's when you can let out the breath you've been holding all your life, and know that all those hours and years were somehow worth it. Then, as a writer, you have arrived.

Well, TriadaUS gave me that. And regardless of if we don't work out, or part ways, I will always remember that I got my dignity back with them, and I was reminded that there are really great agents out there that aren't afraid to be kind and helpful.

And I wish we had more of them like him.

Tri

triceretops
01-06-2006, 02:36 PM
Just thought that I would post the news that Uwe at Triadaus sold four novels last week after a long dry spell. I'm really happy for him and know that he's been net-working with as many editors as time allows. I also signed with him tonight, completely pleased with such a monsterous edit on my manuscript that covered every base having to doing with plot, grammar, consistency, sentence structure, and plot arcs. Happy day, happy day. I think he know qualifies for AAR, which pleases him to no end.

Tri

Sakamonda
01-06-2006, 04:39 PM
This is so great for Uwe. I will have to congratulate him.

victoriastrauss
01-06-2006, 09:35 PM
Just got a message from Uwe Stender.


I have received congratulations from writers for having sold four novels last week and I was wondering why (as I had not, although I wish I had!). I searched and found the source: In the TriadaUS thread on absolutewrite, there is mention of me having sold 4 books. I don't know how that conclusion was reached or why, but it is not true. (And I have NEVER made a claim of that nature, so I am befuddled).

Please, remove that statement and the follow up response.To avoid any appearance of censorship, and also to forestall questions, I'm leaving the posts in place and posting Dr. Stender's correction.

- Victoria

triceretops
01-07-2006, 08:44 AM
Sorry, I'm the idiot who got the misinterpretation!

Tri

CaoPaux
01-16-2006, 11:15 PM
Could you elaborate on what you misinterpreted, please? Did you read "four books out to editors" as "sold", or what?

ETA: Question answered via PM. 'twas indeed confusion over who signed what to whom. :e2paperba

Sakamonda
07-28-2006, 05:19 PM
in case anyone's interested, Uwe just made a sale to Penguin Group for a nonfiction title that will be released six weeks after the sale was made. Details on PublishersMarketplace.

triceretops
07-28-2006, 05:37 PM
That's good news. I know that Uwe is expending a lot of energy with conventions and contacts, and has been doing so since TriadaUS's conception. The fiction market is tight right now and I wish him all the success in a sale there.

tri

Popeyesays
08-14-2006, 04:28 AM
I took the bull by the horns so to speak and sent him two queries back to back. Within six hours I received a "no thank you" for one, but not for the other. He responded on Sunday morning after I sent the queries about 1:00 AM my time. I must assume he puts a lot of effort into his work to be reading queries early Sunday morning. I hope he has a glimmer on the second one.

Regards,
Scott

triceretops
08-14-2006, 04:47 AM
Good luck, Scott. We call him the energizer bunny. Uwe works incredibly hard, all the time, with no let up. He was working Christmas day when he took me on as a client. If you should not hear from him on that second query, just send him a polite reminder about it in a couple three days.

Tri

stormie
08-14-2006, 04:48 AM
Good luck, Scott! Uwe seems like a hard-working agent.

ETA: Interesting--tri and I posted almost the same message at the same time.

Nexusman
09-09-2006, 06:34 AM
I for one received a polite "not what we're looking for" letter about five hours after sending an e-mail query. The only thing I can say is he's quick and courteous.

-Nick

triceretops
09-09-2006, 06:58 AM
Sorry, Nex, he is incredibly swift and has always got to me within hours. Could I ask what genre you sent him?

Tri

Popeyesays
09-09-2006, 07:12 AM
He ws quick with me as well. He turned down Sword of the Dajjal a few days before I found a publisher for it. I sent a query about Jars of Doom at the same time, but he never replied, I'm willing to venture he thought the two queries which arrived not too far apart were duplicates of the same query.

So I never heard back on the second one.

Regards,
Scott

Nexusman
09-09-2006, 07:17 AM
It was a query for my sci-fi novel. Looks like he's leaning more toward non-fiction from what I saw on writersmarket.com, but was still considering some fiction.

-Nick

bloemmarc
09-10-2006, 12:12 AM
I believe he is leaning more towards non-fiction. I just got his rejection letter for my fantasy series, although his did say my query sounded quite interesting. He said it was not the direction he wanted to go.




It was a query for my sci-fi novel. Looks like he's leaning more toward non-fiction from what I saw on writersmarket.com, but was still considering some fiction.

-Nick

OneTeam OneDream
09-10-2006, 05:32 AM
I know its been said over and over, but Uwe is terribly courteous.....have yet to find an agent more courteous.

triceretops
09-10-2006, 05:52 AM
Yes, he is and very swift. I don't know how he handles it all, especially when I bug him with eight or nine emails in a row.

Tri

RachelD4
10-26-2006, 01:56 PM
Good news - or is it? I sent a manuscript to Dr Uwe Stender of TriadUS and following a few re-writes he now says he loves it & is in discussions regarding a contract. Does anyone have a similar experience & should I dare believe / hope that I will soon lose my unpublished virginity?

JerseyGirl1962
10-26-2006, 05:37 PM
Good news - or is it? I sent a manuscript to Dr Uwe Stender of TriadUS and following a few re-writes he now says he loves it & is in discussions regarding a contract. Does anyone have a similar experience & should I dare believe / hope that I will soon lose my unpublished virginity?

Rachel,

I'm not speaking as a client of his, but from perusing these boards, Dr. Stender's had a lot of success selling the non-fiction mss. So far, he hasn't yet sold a fiction one even though, from something I think Tri said, he's done all the right agent-y things (networking and all that).

I'm sure Tri may jump in with his experiences with Dr. Stender.

Good luck to you - and to Tri! :)

~Nancy

RachelD4
10-26-2006, 06:40 PM
Nancy
Thanks very much for this.
Rachel

fsr44
10-26-2006, 07:20 PM
Dear Rachel,
Yes, I have had a similar experience. I signed on with Uwe Stender in July. He was not the only agent expressing interest in my manuscript, but I was most impressed with his honesty and enthusiasm, so I chose to "go with my gut" and choose TriadaUS. I did so being fully aware, as you should be, that Uwe has had success in placing non-fiction but has not yet sold a fiction manuscript.
I can tell you that, so far, my gut instinct has been correct. Uwe is honest, hard-working and always prompt to reply . I have been kept apprised, every step of the way, of where my manuscript has been submitted, who has responded, and what they had to say about it. It has been my understanding that some better-known agents can be harder to get in touch with and are less forthcoming with this information. That may work for some writers, but personally, it would drive me nuts. Your mileage may vary.
As to whether you will "soon" be published, you do need to be realistic. Getting an agent is a big step, and one you should celebrate. But it's just that...a step. It's still another giant step to get your manuscript published. No agent should promise that they can get you published. They should only vow to try.
I believe Uwe is trying his best for me. I'm not yet published, but it's still early days. I wish you much luck, and I hope you choose the agent who is right for you. And I hope sharing my experience with Uwe will be helpful to you.
Best of luck,
fsr

RachelD4
10-26-2006, 09:00 PM
Dear fsr
Your reply is very reassuring. My own experience of Uwe is the same as yours - verbatim. I should clarify, however, that Uwe has not promised to get me published but rather is making sure that my work is being seen by the right people & is passing feedback he receives directly onto me immediately. So, at this stage in my career I don't think I can ask for much more than that.
Again thanks.
Regards
Rachel

fsr44
10-26-2006, 09:10 PM
Glad to hear it. I didn't assume that Uwe would ever promise publication, but put that statement out there more as a general guideline.
Good luck to you. And congratulations for getting this far.

triceretops
10-27-2006, 03:18 AM
I'm also a client and pleased with his drive and enthusiasm. I've been agented before, but not quite like this--he does contact me within hours, gives me current updates--makes suggestions--submits via MY suggestions. He's very, very precise, and will toil over a manuscript until you get it right. He's hit darn near every conference that I can think of in just the last year. He's connected up great.

Listen to his suggestions and rewrite or advise accordingly. He won't send a contract or take you on until you have passed a revision stage, which is the policy of many agents.

It sounds like you might join us. Happy day! And good luck.

Tri

priceless1
10-27-2006, 03:24 AM
Being on the other side of the desk, I can attest that Uwe has always submitted in a very professional manner and includes everything we ask for. If I have questions regarding a submission or an author, he provides an answer within hours.

fsr44
10-27-2006, 05:21 AM
Nice to hear that from "the other side of the desk". Thank you, princess1.

priceless1
10-27-2006, 07:45 PM
Nice to hear that from "the other side of the desk". Thank you, princess1.

'Princess1'? Wow. First time anyone has ever called me 'princess.' I've called A LOT of other things, mind you...

Lynn - princess for a day

fsr44
10-30-2006, 05:32 PM
Ha! Serves me right for reading too quickly. I hereby dub thee the Priceless Princess of this thread. ;)

triceretops
10-30-2006, 05:36 PM
Had it right the first time. Lynn IS a princess, cause she's priceless around these parts.

Tri

arkady
11-04-2006, 02:59 AM
I believe he is leaning more towards non-fiction. I just got his rejection letter for my fantasy series, although his did say my query sounded quite interesting. He said it was not the direction he wanted to go.

"Quite interesting?" Exactly the wording he used for my rejection. It's a form e-rejection. He wants to do non-fiction.

Haydee
11-16-2006, 07:51 AM
Hello everyone... I just discovered this board as I was googling Triada. This thread has been most informative, even if a little heated! I'm happy to say that Uwe asked for my complete manuscript, and I am now anxiously awaiting a reply! Everything that has been said about his eagerness and persistance is really encouraging to me... I really hope he likes my manuscript, because I think he would be the perfect agent for me! I'd rather wait a few years for my book to be published and work with someone honest and friendly than to be wondering about some agent who's too busy to talk to me.

Although I've only had two contacts with Uwe so far (a reply to my email query and a SASE reply to my first 30 pages), one thing that really impressed me was that his reply to my sample was hand-written. In all of my query-writing experience, all I've gotten from agents-- even those who requested to see more-- are form letters, probably stuffed by an anonymous reader.

I have to admit I am a little worried about his lack of sales in fiction, but everything else about his personality and agency seems to indicate that if he takes you on, he'll do his best.

triceretops
11-16-2006, 08:02 AM
Uwe is definitely on the move all the time, batting for us. Below is a partial list of his future attendance plans:

1. I will be a panelist at the Mystery Writers of America New England Chapter's Crimebake from November 10-12. For more info please go to: http://www.mwane.org/crimebake/Default.htm
2. I will be a panelist at the SCWC in San Diego from February 16-19, 2007. For more info please go to: http://www.writersconference.com/scwcmain.html
3. I will be a panelist at the CAPA-U on May 12, 2007 in Hartford.

Hope he likes your full. He does take time out for us. He's never let one of my emails go over 24 hrs.

Tri

Esaugetuh
02-20-2007, 01:00 AM
I sent a query letter to Triadaus on 9/8/06. I heard nothing from him. Sent a second letter and still have not had the courtesty of a reply. I've yet to find a book he's marketed.

aadams73
02-20-2007, 01:09 AM
I sent a query letter to Triadaus on 9/8/06. I heard nothing from him. Sent a second letter and still have not had the courtesty of a reply. I've yet to find a book he's marketed.

You'd do well to resend it. He rejected mine within twenty-four hours, very politely too.

triceretops
02-20-2007, 01:18 AM
Yes, resend it. Something's happened. He's normally very fast. He's at a conference in San Diego right now, but he does get to his email box. Check his website for sales.

Tri

Uwe
02-23-2007, 08:32 PM
Dear Esaugetuh:

Sometimes mail gets lost in a spam filter (assuming you sent an email). If you address an email to me personally, then it will be answered (or to Paul Hudson). If you write generically, i.e. "Dear Agent" or "Dear TriadaUS" or no address at all, then it will not even be read.
If you write a snail mail query, then it has to have an SASE with exact postage or it will not be read.

As far as the books are concerned: Unlocking the Meaning of LOST sold out its first print run of 30,000 copies within four months of release and a second edition is coming out in March. That book was available everywhere.

365 Ways to Save Gas can be found everywhere and Cinderella is being released this month and has already gotten a great review in BOOKLIST. Eight more of my projects will be released in 2007 and many more in 2008 and beyond.

Best,
Uwe

Chumplet
04-03-2007, 08:09 PM
Uwe asked for a partial on my romance yesterday. His words were: "Sounds interesting, please send by snail mail."
Being the dork that I am, I immediately emailed back, "Do you want a partial, or the whole shootin' match?" Then I checked the website again and realized he meant a partial. After I ran up and down the hall a few times, I printed it out and it's in the mail.

James D. Macdonald
04-03-2007, 09:52 PM
Congratulations and best of luck.

Dr. Stender has been racking up some nice sales.

hopeful
04-03-2007, 09:53 PM
Congrats on the partial request, Chumplet!

-hopeful

triceretops
05-09-2007, 07:45 AM
From my Publishers Lunch. Nice one, Uwe! Very proud!


Sports
Top referee in the National Basketball Association Bob Delaney's COVERT: The Undercover Life of Bob Delaney, NBA Official, about a long-secret life as an undercover agent for the New Jersey State Police infiltrating the Mafia, wearing a wire for more than three years to gather evidence that led to the conviction of more than thirty members of the Genovese and Bruno crime families, with a foreword from NBA great Bill Walton, to Philip Turner at Union Square Press/Sterling, for publication in February 2008, to Uwe Stender at TriadaUS Literary Agency (world).
uwe@triadaus.com
pturner@sterlingpub.com


Tri

Aprylwriter
05-09-2007, 09:00 AM
Good luck, Chumplet! :) Please let us know what he says.

Apryl

jedimaster107
06-25-2007, 04:05 AM
From what i've read, it sounds like TriadaUS is a good agency. I discovered this agency when I was searching for agents in PA. I couldn't believe when I stumbled across this one. And the funny things is, since the agency is in Sewickly Pa, I WORK in Sewickly and live across the river in the next town (10 mins away). How funny is that? And I also found them on Agent Query as well. Since they are listed there, I guess they're good. Maybe whenever I get my MS done, I might try them.

Little Red Barn
06-25-2007, 04:55 AM
From what i've read, it sounds like TriadaUS is a good agency. I discovered this agency when I was searching for agents in PA. I couldn't believe when I stumbled across this one. And the funny things is, since the agency is in Sewickly Pa, I WORK in Sewickly and live across the river in the next town (10 mins away). How funny is that? And I also found them on Agent Query as well. Since they are listed there, I guess they're good. Maybe whenever I get my MS done, I might try them.
This agent--Uwe, is a very nice gentleman. :)

triceretops
06-25-2007, 07:09 AM
I'll vouch for Uwe, I've been with for a year. He's goes way beyond what's called for and loves all his little ducks.

Tri

Sakamonda
06-25-2007, 05:41 PM
Uwe/TriadaUS recently earned the coveted pink "Recommended" rating on Preditors & Editors. As one of his longtime clients, I'm so proud of him for that! I remember when he was first starting out and everyone was badmouthing him for not having sold any books yet. Now, he's a respected, recommended agent lauded by watchdog groups who keep track of who's good and who isn't. Bravo, Uwe!

stormie
06-25-2007, 05:51 PM
Uwe asked for a partial on my romance yesterday. His words were: "Sounds interesting, please send by snail mail."
Being the dork that I am, I immediately emailed back, "Do you want a partial, or the whole shootin' match?" Then I checked the website again and realized he meant a partial. After I ran up and down the hall a few times, I printed it out and it's in the mail.
Yay, Chumplet! So what happened since April? Any news or did I miss something yet again?!

priceless1
06-25-2007, 07:23 PM
Uwe came over to our booth during the BEA and introduced himself. He's a very sweet man, and I was so grateful to learn how to pronounce his name. Sometimes it's those little things that make me smile.

triceretops
06-25-2007, 07:57 PM
Lynne, so glad you finally got to meet him.

Tri

Chumplet
06-25-2007, 09:05 PM
Well, he rejected it, but it was a handwritten note:

"Dear Sandra,
Thanks so much for sending the partial. I really enjoy the premise, I think it is very clever. The writing is solid, but, for me, the excitement that was 'described' did not 'come to life' for me. This is so subjective..." yadda yadda you know the rest.

He was very sweet, and encouraging. I'm not giving up hope.

Kate Thornton
06-25-2007, 09:25 PM
Nice going, Chumplet! That's a good rejection, and he sounds like a real gentleman. And if he liked it, you *know* someone else will, too - and more! Get that ms back out there!

stormie
06-25-2007, 11:43 PM
What Kate said. Good luck, Chumplet!

Death Wizard
06-26-2007, 05:40 AM
Uwe (OO-vuh) is my agent, and I can vouch first-hand that he is first class all the way. And he trumpets his accomplishments much less than he could. A couple of his projects, already sold, are going to be huge. He's not far from being upper echelon, if he isn't already.

Sakamonda
06-29-2007, 05:44 AM
I concur. I'm one of Uwe's clients myself and I will shout his praises from the rooftops. (I'll shout them even more next week, when he and I release some exciting news, but you'll have to stay tuned on that. . .)

triceretops
06-29-2007, 06:00 AM
I'm in his stable. Couldn't be more pleased. He demands the best from me and I wouldn't have it any other way. Good for you, Sakamonda. I have an idea what it is. We'll set off some fireworks a little early when it's time

Tri

Susan B
06-29-2007, 07:56 AM
I concur. I'm one of Uwe's clients myself and I will shout his praises from the rooftops. (I'll shout them even more next week, when he and I release some exciting news, but you'll have to stay tuned on that. . .)

Hey Sakamonda--can't wait to hear your good news in detail! (Took a peak at your blog, I confess!) You've been waiting for awhile and sure deserve it.....

Susan

MissLadyRae
06-29-2007, 09:05 AM
Just to echo third party praises, a friend of mine just got repped by Uwe and I have heard nothing but great things about him and his company. He seems to really care and work hard for his clients. That's my third party two cents! lol.

JAG4584
07-30-2007, 09:46 PM
Uwe has been very courteous and very professional.

Axler
07-30-2007, 10:34 PM
Uwe is cool. He's not my agent, but I've met him several times and I think he's trustworthy and honest.

That's the opinion of most people I've talked to who have done business with him.

Sakamonda
07-30-2007, 10:36 PM
He just sold my book. Details to be posted on PublishersMarketplace this week, once I receive & sign the final contract from the publisher.

Uwe's terrific.

JAG4584
07-30-2007, 10:48 PM
From proposal to contract (sale) how many months?

Congratulations!!!

BarbJ
07-30-2007, 10:48 PM
Congratulations, Sakamonda! Woo-hoo-hoo! Yes! :hooray:

giftedrhonda
07-30-2007, 10:58 PM
CONGRATS!!!

swvaughn
07-30-2007, 10:59 PM
He just sold my book. Details to be posted on PublishersMarketplace this week, once I receive & sign the final contract from the publisher.

Uwe's terrific.

Very cool news! Congrats! :)

Sakamonda
07-30-2007, 11:01 PM
[QUOTE]From proposal to contract (sale) how many months?
QUOTE]

I'm supposed to get the final contract today via Fed Ex, after seeing an e-version on Friday. For this particular book, it was about six months from first subbing the proposal to publishers to receiving the final contract. (Of course, this timeline will vary widely from publisher to publisher and book to book).

Axler
07-30-2007, 11:35 PM
Great news, Jill.

Congratulations!

Richard White
07-30-2007, 11:37 PM
Congratulations!

Saundra Julian
07-30-2007, 11:38 PM
Congratulations!! Well done...

RoccoMom
07-30-2007, 11:51 PM
Congrats! What type of book?

Sakamonda
07-30-2007, 11:52 PM
What type of book?
Memoir.

Assuming my contract arrives today and is in proper order, details to be posted later today.

Sakamonda
08-02-2007, 05:49 AM
I'm tooting my own horn (and Uwe's) here for those who are tracking Uwe's deals:

""Jill Elaine Hughes' WACKO, a powerful memoir about surviving mental illness, to Kris Van Hoof-Haines at Hazelden Publishing by Uwe Stender at TriadaUS Literary Agency (World).""

---to be posted today or tomorrow on PublishersMarketplace.

KAP
08-02-2007, 06:39 AM
Wonderful news, Sakamonda. Congratulations.

kap

Brenda Hill
08-02-2007, 07:02 AM
How exciting! Congratulations.

herdon
08-02-2007, 07:47 AM
Cool. Congrats.

dragonjax
08-02-2007, 02:39 PM
Excellent news, Sak.

triceretops
08-02-2007, 03:55 PM
WTG, Jill! And congrats to our agent.

Tri

hopeful
08-02-2007, 05:14 PM
I'm tooting my own horn (and Uwe's) here for those who are tracking Uwe's deals:

""Jill Elaine Hughes' WACKO, a powerful memoir about surviving mental illness, to Kris Van Hoof-Haines at Hazelden Publishing by Uwe Stender at TriadaUS Literary Agency (World).""

---to be posted today or tomorrow on PublishersMarketplace.

Fantastic news!!

Huge congrats!!

All Best,

hopeful

Oberon
08-03-2007, 06:00 AM
Congratulations Sakamonda! Boy, am I jealous! Keep 'em coming!

I'd put a thingy here, but I don't know how. Yet.

JerseyGirl1962
08-06-2007, 06:59 PM
I'd put a thingy here, but I don't know how. Yet.

Oberon,

It's quite easy. :) When you click on the Post or Quote button, you'll see a little smiley on the 1st row of the box that opens up. Click on the down arrow next to the smiley face, and select one. You can also get a ton more by scrolling to the end of the list and clicking on More Smilies.

Oh, and :welcome:

~Nancy

CaoPaux
11-29-2007, 04:59 AM
New agent: Rebecca Post, former editor at Hazelden Publishing.

http://www.geocities.com/cjstender/index.html

Sakamonda
11-30-2007, 06:28 PM
Rebecca Post is very knowledgable of the self-help and psychology genres.

honeycomb
12-23-2007, 02:13 AM
Just looking at the Publishers that Uwe contracts with, "World". Is that correct and who are they?


Thx

Sakamonda
12-28-2007, 06:43 PM
"World" means he sold world print rights. It is not a publisher.

williamfromkc
12-30-2007, 04:53 AM
I got rejected by Triada in AN HOUR! He holds the all time record among all the literary agents for the fastest reply. But he was polite and responsive so I have no complaints.

lmharmon
01-10-2008, 04:53 AM
Uwe is very nice, and business-like, which I appreciate even though we are not working together.

Spiny Norman
01-10-2008, 05:05 AM
I got rejected by Triada in AN HOUR! He holds the all time record among all the literary agents for the fastest reply. But he was polite and responsive so I have no complaints.

Mine's Nathan Bradsford, as of today.

That man handles his inbox like a fry cook with tickets at a diner.

JoNightshade
01-10-2008, 05:05 AM
Now that he's not my agent, thought I'd post here with my experience with this guy. In all ways Uwe was very nice. He read my entire manuscript and wrote me a handwritten, detailed half-page about what he liked about it. And then he said he would have signed me instantly if I had contacted him six months earlier, but that he was no longer taking my type of story. Which of course left me thinking, then why did he read it? But he invited me to send him any future projects. I have another agent now, but I kept the note from Uwe because it was so nice and encouraging. I got my manuscript back, too, and it was quite obvious he had gotten all the way through.

I also appreciated the fact that he got back to me in a very timely manner, so I wasn't left hanging for months and months.

triceretops
01-10-2008, 05:34 PM
Uwe is my agent, and he's been wonderful through any process that we've been assoicated with. He ranked 8th in overall sales for 2007, with some very big tickets and celeb clients. He now has a sub-agent, who specializes in non-fiction and who is giving him a hand. He never fails to get back to me the next day, update me frequently, and show aggresive behavoir when making submissions. I can attest that he reads every sub carefully, and always has something to say, good, bad or indifferent.

I might add that he just recieved the honor of being awarded soccer coach of the year in Pennsylvania, and taking the state championship. He's now on the roster for National Coach of Year, which is indeed an honor. The ethic and winning attitude that he's seared on the minds of his players, is the same attitude he instills in his literary clients.

Tri

hopeful
01-10-2008, 10:58 PM
Inspiring, triceretops!!

Uwe sounds like a wonderful agent, a great soccer coach and an exceptional human being!

- hopeful

scully931
03-13-2008, 09:17 AM
I have a question---

You know how it's a good idea to say something to show you've researched the agent, etc. ? Well, what is the general opinion of saying something like you've heard such great things about them on writer's message boards? (Naming the board or not?) Just curious. I've always come close to saying something like that, but have never put it in.

Thoughts? Thanks! :Shrug:

triceretops
03-13-2008, 12:06 PM
It never hurts, as long as you don't go overboard and take it to the realm of pandering. Certainly some agent's deserve a certain amount of praise because they are so highly rated by authors and their peers. If they've made substantial accomplishments that are impressive, you can mention them in passing. No harm done.

Tri

Karen Duvall
03-18-2008, 02:15 AM
I queried Uwe yesterday and got a request for a partial this morning. I write urban fantasy.

triceretops
03-18-2008, 05:23 AM
Good luck, Karen. Uwe is receptive to urban fantasy and paranormal thriller/romance, much more so than anything else right now. I do know that he has gotten extremely picky. So glad you got the partial response. He's wonderful.

Tri

Karen Duvall
03-18-2008, 06:01 AM
Thanks, Tri. I use QueryTracker to keep track of my queries and when I looked up Uwe, there hadn't been a single positive response to the fantasy queries recorded, so I got to be first. It feels good. Now we'll just see how things pan out from here.:D

chinatown
05-28-2008, 02:23 AM
I emailed a query and heard back in a few hours. He seemed very polite and enthusiastic and asked for the full ms. I'll keep my fingers crossed.

genre: literary fiction, women's

marie2
06-17-2008, 04:19 AM
I just want to put down my two cents. Uwe was really professional and nice when I queried him. He asked for a full and sadly ended up passing but during our correspondence he was incredibly respectful and communicative.

DaveKuzminski
06-26-2008, 03:08 AM
I just received an email from Uwe...he's now a member of AAR. ;)

Chumplet
06-27-2008, 06:27 AM
Excellent! I plan to query when The Yearbook is finished. He was so positive with his rejection of Bad Ice, which will be released next week by Champagne Books.

colealpaugh
04-08-2009, 12:33 PM
A quote from the one of Coach Stender's opponents:

“They were everywhere, they were swarming. We knew they would be. ... We were outmatched.”---Beaver County Times

I guess that's how you want an agent to make editors/publishers to feel. Go Panthers!

triceretops
04-08-2009, 01:16 PM
Oh, yeah. Doc is all that and a bag of chips. Comes through in his personality.

Tri:D

Sage
04-08-2009, 04:05 PM
I am officially represented by Uwe now :)

While I was on vacation two weeks ago, I sent out a query for every thousand words I wrote on my new WIP (and then a few more when I felt like it). I sent one to him on Monday and got a request for a snail mail full within two hours. Since I was away from paper, printer, and envelopes, I had to have a friend print it out and send it to him Tuesday morning. He offered representation that Saturday before I started my drive home. From query to offer was shorter than my one-week vacation, and that included the time the ms was in the mail.

He seems very nice, very professional, and very excited about Love Sucks.

triceretops
04-08-2009, 10:03 PM
Congrats, Sage! Nice to have you aboard. He is very swift--no lag time. Your editing/prep and agent submissions will be just as swift and precise. Be sure to huddle with Uwe and suggest any houses that you think might be appropriet for inclusion in the first round. He evaluates and considers.

Tri

Death Wizard
04-09-2009, 04:50 AM
I am officially represented by Uwe now :)

While I was on vacation two weeks ago, I sent out a query for every thousand words I wrote on my new WIP (and then a few more when I felt like it). I sent one to him on Monday and got a request for a snail mail full within two hours. Since I was away from paper, printer, and envelopes, I had to have a friend print it out and send it to him Tuesday morning. He offered representation that Saturday before I started my drive home. From query to offer was shorter than my one-week vacation, and that included the time the ms was in the mail.

He seems very nice, very professional, and very excited about Love Sucks.

Indeed, congrats!

polleekin
05-10-2009, 05:33 AM
I can't find any information on this-- has this agent sold any fiction yet? I see he's interested in it, but don't see any fiction sales as of now, just the nonfiction. (I know there's a first time for everything when an agent is branching out, just wondering.) Thanks in advance for any info. :)

victoriastrauss
05-10-2009, 06:58 PM
An agent's track record speaks louder than his or her expressed interests. An agency that has a strong track record of selling nonfiction, but has been in business for several years with an interest in fiction but has yet to sell any fiction, is likely not the best fit for a novelist.

- Victoria

CaoPaux
05-11-2009, 08:31 PM
I can't find any information on this-- has this agent sold any fiction yet? I see he's interested in it, but don't see any fiction sales as of now, just the nonfiction. (I know there's a first time for everything when an agent is branching out, just wondering.) Thanks in advance for any info. :)According to his website, he does have a few fiction sales. The last was in July '08, though, so it doesn't seem to be his strength/focus.

Isenhowergirl
06-04-2009, 01:27 AM
Dr. Stender is so cool. He's sold YA fiction for sure. I signed with his agency just a few weeks ago (I write YA) and today he sent out my novel to editors. He's such a nice guy and I love his enthusiasm. Query him. He's awesome.

polleekin
06-04-2009, 02:38 AM
Sorry for the long delay in responding. Thanks for the info. I was curious because someone I know is possibly interested in submitting to him, but I couldn't find much on fiction sales. He does seem very good for nonfiction, though.

Laura Lond
06-05-2009, 03:43 AM
This agent was quick in my case, responding with a next-day rejection. He addressed me by my husband's name, Stephen, but it is still better than having to wait for long weeks to hear back after sending a query. :D

seeker4
06-19-2009, 11:27 PM
Queried Uwe today for my YA fiction novel for kicks and got a request for a full via snail mail. Have any of had any contact with him lately on fiction projects?

eqb
06-20-2009, 12:26 AM
Out of curiosity, has this agent made *any* sales since he opened his doors? Other than the two reported?

LookingforAdvice
06-20-2009, 02:21 AM
Out of curiosity, has this agent made *any* sales since he opened his doors? Other than the two reported?

From his website.

Fiction

Mark SaFranko's "Hating Olivia" was released on April 1, 2009 in France as "Putain d'Olivia" to great fanfare. TV 2 reviewed the novel favorably. The Canadian magazine Toro just ran a feature on Mark, which you can read here: http://www.toromagazine.com/?q=node/1495

New Deal Announcement (July 23, 2008):
Dan Fante's novels to Harper Perennial:
Dan Fante's "86'd", the fourth Bruno Dante novel for a 2009 publication date, by Uwe Stender of TriadaUS Literary Agency to Amy Baker at Harper Perennial(World). Harper Perennial also acquired the rights to the other Bruno Dante novels "Mooch", "Spitting Off Tall Buildings", and "Chump Change." The release dates T.B.D.


Jill Elaine Hughes', writing as Jamaica Layne, "Market For Love," a contemporary erotic romance to Adam Nevill at Virgin Books by Uwe Stender at TriadaUS Literary Agency (World; E-rights to Madris DePasture at New Concepts Publishing).


Shawn Thorgersen's YA novel "Bizenghast" based on characters and situations created by M. Alice LeGrow, to Jenna Winterberg at TokyoPop by Uwe Stender at TriadaUS Literary Agency (World).
Dan Fante's MOOCH was optioned by Michelle Weisler (The Ring, The Ring 2).

Non Fiction

Linda Cunningham at Guideposts Books pre-empted the true story of a wise 3-legged cat named Tripod and his life lessons by Daryn Kagan, ex-CNN news analyst and purveyor of good news stories on DarynKagan.com by agent Uwe Stender at TriadaUS Literary Agency (World).


Elizabeth LaBan's "The GrandParents Handbook", to David Borgenicht at Quirk Books, in a nice deal, for publication in 2009, by Uwe Stender at TriadaUS Literary Agency (World).


Susan Irby's "The Seven Dollar A Meal Healthy Cookbook", to Paula Munier at Adams Media, in a nice deal, for publication in 2009, by Uwe Stender at TriadaUS Literary Agency (World).
Dr. Ernest Zebrowski's "Global Climate Change", to Charles Nurnberg at Imagine Books, in a nice deal, for publication in 2010, by Uwe Stender at TriadaUS Literary Agency (World).


Susan Irby's "Seven Dollars A Meal Quick And Easy Cookbook", to Paula Munier at Adams Media, in a nice deal, for publication in 2009, by Uwe Stender at TriadaUS Literary Agency (World).




Dr. Duke Johnson's THE OPTIMAL HEALTH REVOLUTION: How Inflammation is the Root Cause of the Biggest Killers� and How the Cutting-Edge Science of Nutrigenomics Can Transform Your Long-term Health, a science-based guide to health, to Glenn Yeffeth at BenBella Books, in a good deal, for publication in May 2009, by Uwe Stender at TriadaUS Literary Agency and Lisa Berkowitz at Berkowitz & Associates (World).


Film rights to Covert have been optioned in a significant deal. Details will be given when/if actual production and filming commences.
TV series/film rights to Fake Alibi have been optioned in a very good deal. Details will be given when/if actual production and filming of Pilot starts.
Activist journalist and BET host, Jeff Johnson, explodes old school notions of life's purpose in EVERYTHING I�M NOT , MADE ME EVERYTHING I AM, an inspiring guide for discovering your personal B.E.S.T. to Cheryl Woodruff at SmileyBooks/Hay House, in a six-figure 2-book deal, Book I for 2009 publication date, by Uwe Stender of TriadaUS Literary Agency (World).


World-renowned consultant and speaker Dr. Kevin Elko and bestselling author Bill Beausay's "True Greatness" to Jacquie Flynn at Amacom by Uwe Stender at TriadaUS Literary Agency (World). This book shares how to build greatness in your business life through a self-focused, conscious and sub-conscious reengineering of your mind.


Bestselling author and NAACP Image Award Recipient Omar Tyree's "The Equation." This book provides a groundbreaking formula that teaches the reader how to apply the four undisputable components of all successful business to Shannon Vargo at Wiley by Uwe Stender and Becky Post at TriadaUS Literary Agency (World).
David Lavery's "The Essential Cult Television Reader" to Leila Salisbury at University Press of Kentucky by Uwe Stender at TriadaUS Literary Agency (World).


Dale McGowan's "Raising Freethinkers." This book is the accompanying project to Dale McGowan's successful book "Parenting Beyond Belief", again to Christina Parisi at Amacom by Uwe Stender at TriadaUS Literary Agency (World).
Dr. Joel Block and KD Neumann's THE SEXUAL SOLUTION, showing readers how to use erotic play and sex as a way to work out conflicts and create verbal intimacy, to Paula Munier at Adams Media, in a nice deal, for publication in 2009, by Uwe Stender at TriadaUS Literary Agency (world).
Lynnette Porter's "The Hobbits: The Many Lives of Bilbo, Frodo, Sam, Merry and Pippin." This book provides a well-researched discussion and analysis of the many ways that hobbits have been adapted to meet audiences� expectations and present the stories in audience-pleasing ways, to Philippa Brewster at I.B. Tauris by Uwe Stender at TriadaUS Literary Agency (World).
Dr. David Page and Dr. Pamela Rowland's "How to Survive Your Surgery" covers every aspect of surgical care in nine steps from first assessment by your surgeon to going home from a high tech hospital, to Philip Turner at Sterling by Uwe Stender at TriadaUS Literary Agency (World).


Dr. Joel Block and KD Neumann's The Real Reasons Men Commit, a guide for women on how to make the man in their life commit to a long term relationship, to Paula Munier at Adams Media by Uwe Stender at TriadaUS Literary Agency (World).
Jill Elaine Hughes' Wacko, a powerful memoir about surviving mental illness, to Kris Van Hoof-Haines at Hazelden Publishing by Uwe Stender at TriadaUS Literary Agency (World).



Brad Turk's Lifemoney: The Proven System for Creating the Money You NEED for the Life You WANT, the book to help you understand what success really means and teach you how to attain it, to Glenn Yeffeth at BenBella Books by Uwe Stender at TriadaUS Literary Agency (World).


Bridget Graham and Monique Reidy's "How Can I, Like, Totally Get a Job?", the book to help college graduates find the job that matches their skills, to Paula Munier at Adams Media, in a nice deal, by Uwe Stender at TriadaUS Literary Agency (World).


Daryn Kagan's "What's Possible! Creating Possibilities Beyond Life's 5 Biggest Obstacles," To be Released in May '08, to Lisa Berkowitz at Meredith Books, a division of the Meredith Corporation (NYSE: MDP),one of America's leading media and marketing companies. "What's Possible! Creating Possibilities Beyond Life's 5 Biggest Obstacles," will feature original stories and reports about people whose experiences and challenges have inspired and affected change in the world. These are real stories about real people who are extraordinary in every sense of the word.



Lynnette Porter, David Lavery and Hillary Robson's Battlestar Galactica, a timely analysis of the TV phenomenon Battlestar Galactica, to Peter Lynch at Sourcebooks in a nice deal, will be released in 2008.
Nicholas Holt and Elizabeth Hutcheson's FAKE ALIBI, about the adventures associated with the Fake Alibi business, to Glenn Yeffeth at BenBella Books, in a nice deal, by Uwe Stender at TriadaUS Literary Agency (World).

Top referee in the National Basketball Association Bob Delaney's COVERT: The Undercover Life of Bob Delaney, NBA Official, written with Dave Scheiber, award winning journalist, about a long-secret life as an undercover agent for the New Jersey State Police infiltrating the Mafia, wearing a wire for more than three years to gather evidence that led to the conviction of more than thirty members of the Genovese and Bruno crime families, with a foreword from NBA great Bill Walton, to Philip Turner at Union Square Press/Sterling, for publication in February 2008, by Uwe Stender at TriadaUS Literary Agency (world).



Amy Hendel's FAT FAMILIES, THIN FAMILIES: How to Save Your Family from the Obesity Trap & Become a �Healthy Family for Life�, the first and only book to provide a broad-scale, thorough, practical and proven family solution for fighting the obesity crisis, to Glenn Yeffeth at BenBella Books in a nice deal, to be released in 2008.



Lynnette Porter, David Lavery and Hillary Robson's Heroes Unmasked: An Unofficial Look, a timely analysis of the TV phenomenon HEROES, to Jennifer Hale at ECW Press in a nice deal, will be released in October 2007.


In Parenting Beyond Belief, Dale McGowan celebrates the freedom that comes with raising kids without formal indoctrination and advises parents on the most effective way to raise freethinking children. With advice from educators, doctors, psychologists, and philosophers as well as wisdom from everyday parents, the book offers tips and insights on a variety of topics, from "mixed marriages" to coping with death and loss, and from morality and ethics to dealing with holidays. Sensitive and timely, Parenting Beyond Belief features reflections from such freethinkers as Mark Twain, Richard Dawkins, Bertrand Russell, and wellness guru Dr. Don Ardell that will empower every parent to raise both caring and independent children without constraints. The book will be released in April 2007.
John Holt's CHASING FISH TALES reprint rights to Tom Swanson at Bison Books in a nice deal, will be released in early 2008.
John Holt's GUIDE WARS reprint rights to Tom Swanson at Bison Books in a nice deal, will be released in late 2008.


Michael Litos' nonfiction book CINDERELLA, a timely look at the triumphs and tribulations of Mid Major College Basketball to Peter Lynch at Sourcebooks in a nice deal, will be released in early 2007.



Rocky Lang's and Dr. Erick Montero's CONFESSIONS OF EMERGENCY ROOM DOCTORS about the humorous and bizarre happenings in ER's, to Katie Anderson at Andrews McMeel in a nice deal, for publication in September 2007.


Lynnette Porter, David Lavery and Hillary Robson's new LOST-related project with topic TBD, again to Peter Lynch at Sourcebooks in a nice deal, for publication in 2007.
Portuguese Rights to UNLOCKING THE MEANING OF LOST sold to Editora Novo S�culo Ltda. in a nice deal.


DK Publishing/Penguin Publishing Group announces the September 2006 publication of Dr. Ron Weiers's 365 WAYS TO SAVE GAS ($9.99; trade paper; 382 pages), a book of helpful tips to help consumers conserve gas and save money. Written in accessible language by an expert in the field of fuel efficiency, 365 WAYS TO SAVE GAS offers readers practical solutions to combat the nation's skyrocketing gas prices. Editor Brian Saliba acquired the title from Dr. Uwe Stender of TriadaUS Literary Agency.



Dale McGowan's (with Richard Dawkins, Julia Sweeney, Penn Jillette, Michael Shermer, Don Ardell and other contributors), SECULAR PARENTING, about raising children without religion � and the many issues that relate directly to it to Christina Parisi at Amacom, in a nice deal.



David Lavery's WONDER BOY, a comprehensive critical biography of Buffy the Vampire Slayer's creator and Wonder Woman director, Joss Whedon, to Phillipa Brewster at Tauris (United Kingdom). In the USA, the book will be distributed by St.Martin's/Palgrave.

Aaron Clark writing as Jonathan Price's MULTIPLE JOB OFFERS IN TEN DAYS!,a guide to beating the current job market through guerilla self-marketing tactics, whether your goal is to move laterally, climb the ladder, or shift gears altogether into a dream job, to Michael Pye at Career Press, working jointly with Gina Panettieri at Talcott Notch Literary Services, (world English).


Tony Moss's nonfiction book OUT OF THE POCKET, an inside account of a football program (Villanova)in the maelstrom of the cruel class system that exists in college football in the 21st century, to Rob Taylor at University of Nebraska Press in a nice deal, for publication in 2007.



Lynnette Porter's and David Lavery's nonfiction book LOST WORLD, a timely look at the significance of the series LOST within television programming, as well as the many themes that resonate within our culture, to Peter Lynch at Sourcebooks in a nice deal, for publication in 2006.

Sage
06-20-2009, 02:48 AM
Uwe is definitely a superstar in the non-fiction department.

I believe he has made fiction sales for triceretops and deathwizard here on AW, however, I do not know the details, and I could be wrong.

My experience with him was not the best, but that might just be an individual case.

However, if you want super-fast communication, Uwe is the guy. I would not be surprised if he contacts seeker4 within the week about the snail-mailed full (with whichever response). He called me on the Saturday after the Tuesday I put my full in the mail.

seeker4
06-20-2009, 02:59 AM
Uwe is definitely a superstar in the non-fiction department.

I believe he has made fiction sales for triceretops and deathwizard here on AW, however, I do not know the details, and I could be wrong.

My experience with him was not the best, but that might just be an individual case.

However, if you want super-fast communication, Uwe is the guy. I would not be surprised if he contacts seeker4 within the week about the snail-mailed full (with whichever response). He called me on the Saturday after the Tuesday I put my full in the mail.


Thanks for the heads up, Sage. I'm actually doing cuts right now per another agent's suggestions so I'm going to finish those this weekend and send her the revision before printing and sending to Uwe.

Marva
06-20-2009, 03:35 AM
He's also a super-fast responder. Of course, I thought it would take longer than one minute to receive, read, and respond with a reject to an email query. I guess he's taken the Evelyn Wood speed-reading course. You know the one. Read Dear..., hit reply, paste form reject, hit send. Very efficient.

eqb
06-20-2009, 04:24 PM
Fiction

Mark SaFranko's "Hating Olivia" was released on April 1, 2009 in France as "Putain d'Olivia" to great fanfare.

New Deal Announcement (July 23, 2008):
Dan Fante's novels to Harper Perennial:

Jill Elaine Hughes', writing as Jamaica Layne, "Market For Love,"

Shawn Thorgersen's YA novel "Bizenghast" based on characters and situations created by M. Alice LeGrow, to Jenna Winterberg at TokyoPop by Uwe Stender at TriadaUS Literary Agency (World).


Thanks, LookingforAdvice. His nonfiction record is outstanding, I agree. Still, only four fiction sales over several years seems to imply that fiction isn't his focus. Unless there are more that he hasn't listed.

Uwe
06-24-2009, 07:30 PM
Dear eqb, dear Seeker 4 etc.:

I just wanted to join the conversation for a minute to clarify. First of, I am an AAR member and adhere to their guidelines.

Yesterday, I sold my eighth novel. That deal is not yet on the website. I only announce deals once the contracts have been signed and mailed. Fiction is becoming more and more a focus of mine and current and future deals will make that clear. I am always looking for strong fiction and nonfiction.

The best way to see what sales I have is to go to my website (just know that sales will only be announced once the contracts have been signed and mailed):
http://www.triadaus.com

Under the fiction tab you can find the fiction sales and under the nonfiction tab you can find the nonfiction sales.

Under "Company News" you can see sales and other activities.

Best wishes,
Uwe

seeker4
06-24-2009, 09:09 PM
Dear eqb, dear Seeker 4 etc.:

I just wanted to join the conversation for a minute to clarify. First of, I am an AAR member and adhere to their guidelines.

Yesterday, I sold my eighth novel. That deal is not yet on the website. I only announce deals once the contracts have been signed and mailed. Fiction is becoming more and more a focus of mine and current and future deals will make that clear. I am always looking for strong fiction and nonfiction.

The best way to see what sales I have is to go to my website (just know that sales will only be announced once the contracts have been signed and mailed):
http://www.triadaus.com

Under the fiction tab you can find the fiction sales and under the nonfiction tab you can find the nonfiction sales.

Under "Company News" you can see sales and other activities.

Best wishes,
Uwe

Hi Uwe,

Thanks so much for answering questions. I will be sending my requested full to you this weekend (you requested it on 6/19). Look forward to hearing your feedback regarding my novel.

JoshPatton
07-07-2009, 05:11 AM
My experience:

I realize that Dr. Stender has some very vociferous supporters (in a textual sense) and I am not posting this to disparage him, but merely share my experience. I wrote for awhile, went away from it, and now I am coming back into the field. I am from Pittsburgh and this guy's office is about ten minutes away from my house, so I thought I would e-mail him. Not as a potential client looking for an agent, but on a "human" level, if you will.

Now, allow me to add that I understand that perhaps he is far too busy to be bothered with replying to a strange dude asking about the business of writing. I know this. I understand this. What I am writing to report is that in the e-mail reply he sent, it was a rejection. I am not sure if he read my e-mail at all. I included links of some of the recent work I had been doing, but not as part of any pitch. This thread really helped me in my decision to contact him in the first place, so I just thought I would share.

I know, I am probably being an ass.

Sage
07-07-2009, 05:22 AM
Hey, Josh. A lot of agents will take any e-mail that they receive that is not clearly one novel being queried and reject it. Agents get a lot of e-mail that *is* meant to be a query but is not in anything resembling a query. Authors talking about themselves mostly, or ones asking if it's okay to query the agent, or ones that mention every novel they ever wrote, or ones that send pictures of themselves. There have been lots of agent blogs that have mentioned authors querying them with links to their work and saying that they absolutely will not click on the link and if that's all the info the author has, they'll reject it. My guess would be that he skimmed your e-mail just enough to know that you weren't giving him enough of a description of a book to get a sense of whether he'd want to see more or not, assumed it was a query where you expected him to click the links, and then rejected it.

Irysangel
07-07-2009, 07:43 PM
My experience:

I realize that Dr. Stender has some very vociferous supporters (in a textual sense) and I am not posting this to disparage him, but merely share my experience. I wrote for awhile, went away from it, and now I am coming back into the field. I am from Pittsburgh and this guy's office is about ten minutes away from my house, so I thought I would e-mail him. Not as a potential client looking for an agent, but on a "human" level, if you will.

Now, allow me to add that I understand that perhaps he is far too busy to be bothered with replying to a strange dude asking about the business of writing. I know this. I understand this. What I am writing to report is that in the e-mail reply he sent, it was a rejection. I am not sure if he read my e-mail at all. I included links of some of the recent work I had been doing, but not as part of any pitch. This thread really helped me in my decision to contact him in the first place, so I just thought I would share.

I know, I am probably being an ass.

I don't work with Dr. Stender, but I've highlighted the parts of your message that I find confusing. So you emailed him, asked for advice on writing, and included links to your work?

Sorry, but that's still a query. No matter how couched you have it in niceties (and I'm puzzled about the whole 10 minutes from my house thing), you're still asking him to look at your stuff to see if it has potential.

You wouldn't do this to a lawyer or a psychologist or someone else who offers a service that you pay for. An agent is no different.

Sorry. We are free with the advice here on AW, and we promise to respond. ;) But an agent's job is basically to treat his job like a business, and that means not giving away free advice or help.

triceretops
07-07-2009, 09:49 PM
Confusing to me, too.

An agent, any agent for that matter, has limitations on their time to get through a regular workload as it is. Most agents that I know of are very relunctant to chase links down and review writing samples from blogs or personal websites. This is common knowledge. If you wanted to befriend this man on a personal level then it should have been a hardmail letter containing content that was appropriet for such an introduction. Perhaps you met him at a conference or writing groups--fine, you could express that in your letter.

But take in mind that 99% of everything agents receive through the mail is directly related to his/her business, and is treated as such. Either you're looking for official representation or you're not. There's nothing in between here. There's no "maybe" or "perhaps" questions of representation--you make that sub in a business-like manner and take the lumps like the rest of us.

priceless1
07-08-2009, 01:24 AM
Josh, it's not unusual to be inundated with people wanting help. The truth of the matter is that this kind of contact can be quite intrusive. It's rare that we have the time to blow off a few minutes to read an email asking for advice and such. The old adage of "what's in it for me?" is true. If you're not querying - even though you included links to your work - then why would Uwe or anyone else read your email? We don't have signs that say, "hey, stop on over for a cuppa." We're honestly busy. Sorry, but it's a matter of perspective.

JoshPatton
07-08-2009, 01:53 AM
You wouldn't do this to a lawyer or a psychologist or someone else who offers a service that you pay for.

Well maybe that is something one SHOULDN'T do, but it sounds exactly like something I would do.

JoshPatton
07-08-2009, 02:53 AM
Josh, it's not unusual to be inundated with people wanting help. The truth of the matter is that this kind of contact can be quite intrusive. It's rare that we have the time to blow off a few minutes to read an email asking for advice and such. The old adage of "what's in it for me?" is true. If you're not querying - even though you included links to your work - then why would Uwe or anyone else read your email? We don't have signs that say, "hey, stop on over for a cuppa." We're honestly busy. Sorry, but it's a matter of perspective.

Again, I am new, this may not be the appropriate place, and please understand I am not trying to get into a pissing match with you all. That being said, Priceless1, I certainly hope that no one else in these forums thinks this way or I have found the WRONG place. I have worked in sales and the corporate slut-factory that is big business and that sort of attitude towards others is what really, really sucks about the world today and why no one except brown-nosing d-bags seem to make it. (No offense to anyone that may have made it and not be a d-bag)

I know business is tough and we all have better things to do, but why the hell not take a few seconds to read something sent directly to you and then reply in a human way. In one of the crappy sales jobs I have had, I recall receiving about 150 e-mails a day from prospective college students, each with a very specific problem that I did my best to answer. Now, my corporate overlords had your attitude and unless I was certain they were going to apply to the school, I was to pay them no mind. I asked, "How will I know if they are going to apply or not, if I don't answer their questions?"

"That's just not how it works." I was fired about a year and a half later, and I hadn't signed up many students. But all of my students were still in school a year and half later. What was in that for me? The knowledge that I was in a position able to help and I did.

You ask why Uwe or anyone else WOULD read my e-mail? I ask you, why not? First off, it was sent to him. Do you only respond to strangers' questions if they are posted on some large anonymous forum? You say "we are honestly busy." Who isn't? I am a single dad, unemployed, no degree, mother in bankruptcy and failing health, and I am still selfish enough to try and make a go of this writing thing. I see a guy in the business a one zone bus ride away from me and I read this forum and think, wow he had a tough start, I am sure he could at least relate. So yeah, a few words of encouragement from other "busy" people might be welcome.

Your time, your "business" is in no way superior to mine or anyone else's. You call it intrusive? Why? You post your e-mail address for people to find and when someone does do you delete it unless it comes with an attachment of dollar signs? Finally, correct me if I am wrong, but agents are salespeople who make money off others' products (Kind of like another local boy, Bill Mays) and who knows I may be brilliant and could have been a cash cow.

Yeah maybe you guys are right and I should pay $150 to go to see some hack at a writer's conference tell me to write queries of "things I'd want to read," so I can meet other people in the business without being given the brush off. No thanks, I'd rather become a postal clerk for 12 years, of course in this economy that isn't the bad job it once was.

Look if anyone is still reading, this isn't the place for this. Where is the Shallow & Self-Serving Thread so I can continue this discussion?

Also is there any sort of record for how many posts it takes someone to get banned from the forums, cause I have a feeling I may be in the running for that soon.

Joshua M. Patton

stormie
07-08-2009, 03:02 AM
Yeah maybe you guys are right and I should pay $150 to go to see some hack at a writer's conference tell me to write queries of "things I'd want to read," so I can meet other people in the business without being given the brush off. No one said to pay any money to anyone. As in any business, you have to start out by following the rules.


Look if anyone is still reading, this isn't the place for this. Where is the Shallow & Self-Serving Thread so I can continue this discussion? You can go over to Take It Outside (http://absolutewrite.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=32)boards.


Also is there any sort of record for how many posts it takes someone to get banned from the forums, cause I have a feeling I may be in the running for that soon. It's pretty hard to get banned from AW. You're just stating your opinions--pretty strongly--but so far it seems okay. Then again, I'm not a mod.

Cyia
07-08-2009, 03:14 AM
You ask why Uwe or anyone else WOULD read my e-mail? I ask you, why not? First off, it was sent to him. Do you only respond to strangers' questions if they are posted on some large anonymous forum? You say "we are honestly busy." Who isn't? I am a single dad, unemployed, no degree, mother in bankruptcy and failing health, and I am still selfish enough to try and make a go of this writing thing. I see a guy in the business a one zone bus ride away from me and I read this forum and think, wow he had a tough start, I am sure he could at least relate. So yeah, a few words of encouragement from other "busy" people might be welcome.

Your time, your "business" is in no way superior to mine or anyone else's. You call it intrusive? Why? You post your e-mail address for people to find and when someone does do you delete it unless it comes with an attachment of dollar signs? Finally, correct me if I am wrong, but agents are salespeople who make money off others' products (Kind of like another local boy, Bill Mays) and who knows I may be brilliant and could have been a cash cow.


The main reason? It's not their job. Agents can only devote a small part of their day to answering queries. They have clients that they're already representing that they have to take care of. That means contracts and dealing with editors, etc. Querying isn't their primary occupation and every email they're sent that isn't the most polished effort possible takes time away from the people who are actually trying to find representation and time away from those to whom they are already contractually obligated.

Better than 95% of what an agent sees on a daily basis is slush, and from reading here as well as agent blogs, etc. it's clear that said slush can be spotted from the first few lines. That's the reason for the form letters - and you should be happy you got that much of a response. Most agents have had to implement the "no response = no" policy because so much of that 95+% thinks they're owed detailed responses and notes and explanations as to why their work isn't right. Giving even small personalized response leads to being cursed and belittled. If you're not even attempting to use the contact information for the purpose it was intended - as in submitting for consideration - then you shouldn't be too put out when the agent doesn't consider it worthwhile.

You have to multiply that "few seconds" by a few hundred - which is a few hours worth, and those are hours they aren't being paid for. If someone dropped a pile of work on your desk through lunch, breaks, and after hours and shrugged it off as "why not look at my stuff for free?" you wouldn't be too happy with them.

<snips>

Also is there any sort of record for how many posts it takes someone to get banned from the forums, cause I have a feeling I may be in the running for that soon.


(and I'm pretty sure the record is one - though it's usually for spammers.)

Unimportant
07-08-2009, 03:26 AM
Josh, I don't know anything about this agent in particular, but many agents have an intern slush reader or an email filter or both. Anything sent to the email address they reserve for queries has to pass an intern's or computer system's basic check. Spam goes into the bin. Queries that are incorrectly formatted or that include attachments or that are just links to the person's work online or are in the wrong genre (or whatever specifications the agent has in place) get an automatic form rejection. Queries that pass the initial test go to the agent him/herself. So it's quite possible that this agent never even saw your email, and that the computer filters slotted it into the auto-reject folder.

It doesn't sound like your email to him was very clear with regards to what you were requesting, and that's probably a large part of the problem. I have contacted people in the publishing industry for reasons other than submitting/querying, and I've had pretty good success at having them respond positively, but I've always been very very clear what I want, whether that be clarification of their submission guidelines, or permission to quote them, or a request for an interview. As in any other industry, publishing people are busy professionals and it's best to approach them as such, especially when they are total strangers and you asking them for a favour.

JoshPatton
07-08-2009, 04:30 AM
Well thanks all, and I don't really disparage Dr. Stender or his employees for not answering the question, I am sure he is a good agent.

Waste deep in slush,
Joshua Patton