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seun
12-10-2007, 06:15 PM
Do you have certain days or periods when you deliberately don't write? Your birthday, for example? Or something as basic as a Friday when you've finished your working week and just want to veg out?

Inky
12-10-2007, 06:16 PM
When I sleep.

seun
12-10-2007, 06:18 PM
:)

Good answer.

Zelenka
12-10-2007, 06:18 PM
When I sleep.

I would've said that too, except last night I had to get back up again and write down a new plot thread.

I deliberately don't write if I have work due, essays or exam revision. Or rather I limit myself and don't allow myself to write or play with WIPs until I've done a set amount.

Shady Lane
12-10-2007, 06:39 PM
When I don't want to.

Siddow
12-10-2007, 07:13 PM
Well, I don't think this is really deliberate, but I don't write when I'm upset about something. I just can't. I have to resolve whatever the issue is before my brain can concentrate on anything else.

Shadow_Ferret
12-10-2007, 07:31 PM
When I don't want to.
Yeah. When I don't feel like it.

WendyNYC
12-10-2007, 07:37 PM
On the days when I have too much to do. I try to write a little, but sometimes I have stuff going on all day and into the evening.

I write less on the weekends, but I try to write at least some, even if it's only 200 words.

WriterInChains
12-10-2007, 07:57 PM
When I'm sick.

Otherwise, my goal is new words every day -- even if it's only a few scrawled between phone calls at work.

seun
12-10-2007, 07:58 PM
I've often said I write every day although that isn't true. I don't write on Fridays or those days when everything gets in the way. Thinking about it, I would write every day if life was different.

jenngreenleaf
12-10-2007, 08:00 PM
When I have a hard time focusing. Like now, for example. I can write silly forum posts, but that's about all . . .

jennifer75
12-10-2007, 08:00 PM
Lately, everyday.

Azure Skye
12-10-2007, 08:27 PM
When I'm too tired and can't focus. When I'm pissy (I avoid everything then). On the weekends when my "spouse" is home. For some reason, I can't concentrate when he's around.

Lyra Jean
12-10-2007, 08:33 PM
During the year when I'm in school. I also work full time so when I'm in school it's nearly impossible to keep up with my writing. I'm looking forward to getting some BIC time after this Wednesday when the semester ends for me.

scarletpeaches
12-10-2007, 08:36 PM
There's no particular day I don't write - I just don't, if I can't be bothered. For instance, there are certain times of the month when I get weepy and more down on myself than normal, and don't want to be confronted with the suckitudinousness* of my own work. And usually during, and the day after, a migraine, for obvious reasons.

*Real word, (C) s.peaches lexicon, 2007.

JamieFord
12-10-2007, 08:38 PM
I try not to write on Sundays. Just to mentally give myself a day off. That being stated, I couldn't wait until Monday and wrote 1,200 words at about 10:00pm last night...

DeadlyAccurate
12-10-2007, 08:43 PM
I usually blow off Saturdays (and that includes most housework, chores, and anything of responsibility), though sometimes I'm in the mood to write anyway. If we have a D&D game on a Friday, I simply don't have time to write. Otherwise, I write whether I'm in the mood or not, with very rare exceptions.

Pat~
12-10-2007, 08:48 PM
I try not to write when company's over. :D

jenngreenleaf
12-10-2007, 08:52 PM
I try not to write when company's over. :DIf company ever came over, this thought would've come to mind. LOL

scarletpeaches
12-10-2007, 08:53 PM
I never have company, thereby negating the need for troublesome social niceties.

jenngreenleaf
12-10-2007, 08:58 PM
I actually like having company, but there's always a million reasons why people can never come by . . . so we always have to pack up the kids and bring them around everywhere. It's annoying.

Jaycinth
12-10-2007, 09:06 PM
I don't write at work.

I used to, but getting yanked out of an immersion in a fantasy world is too troubling to deal with during a normal work day.

And I am a little afraid of someone saying my company owns part of the creative rights. Although that is not likely, I once mentioned to my boss that I got a short published, and her first response was 'so that is what you were doing instead of the financial statements'?'

(Uh, no, I was doing something for her...but...)

I'd written it before I started here, so I told her I wrote it in 2004....

...never less, it made me think.

I don't write at 3 am and I don't write during football games unless my team is seriously losing...
(did I mention I finished a novel? Stop laughing Mr. Ferret!)

Every other time...writing is an option.

Oh...I don't write in church.

JeanneTGC
12-10-2007, 09:16 PM
I try not to write when company's over. :D
Like Pat, I try not to write when company's over...though, admittedly, I don't always succeed...

I pretty much always write. In my sleep (ideas), at the computer (actually doing it ), when I'm doing something else (running plotlines and scenes).

Apparently, I'm massively obsessed. Who'd have figured that? LOL

nessam
12-10-2007, 09:22 PM
When the family is home. Too many distractions. When I do try to write when they are home, the distractions become very visible in my writing.

CandlestickJay
12-10-2007, 09:24 PM
When I'm in Show Crunch Week. In other words, the week or two before I perform I'm all theatre all the time - building set, working on music, setting sound cues, setting light cues, working with my actors, running lines.....RAWR. Needless to say I get very little done when I'm rehearsing til 11.

aka eraser
12-10-2007, 11:11 PM
I don't write on weekends or when on vacation except to jot down ideas, turns of phrase etc. that I may want to follow up on later.

chartreuse
12-10-2007, 11:47 PM
Good timing on the question. Between right around this time every year and a couple of days after Xmas, I find myself so busy and distracted I can't get anything done.

Also, there's a couple of days every four weeks or so where I don't feel well enough to do anything (I'm sure some of you girls can guess the cause).

kristie911
12-11-2007, 12:28 AM
Any time I'm fighting my depression. Any words I force out are crap anyway and well, I just don't feel like it. Anything I might write during those times are usually depressing themselves.

Though sometimes I will journal during those times, once in a while it actually helps to get the dark out of my head and onto paper.

scarletpeaches
12-11-2007, 12:55 AM
I are nots to be likings teh black dog either, Krusty.

otterman
12-11-2007, 04:34 AM
During sex. Although I do run through some plot ideas.

heatheringemar
12-12-2007, 03:41 AM
When I don't feel like it.

I'm the type of person that has to have the bug in order to get things accomplished, so when I don't feel the 'writing bug' I don't sit down and write. I may still hash out details in my head, but I don't actually "write."

Chasing the Horizon
12-12-2007, 05:32 AM
When I'm driving (I firmly believe in keeping at least one hand on the wheel and one eye on the road, particularly when going down the highway at 80 mph.)

When I'm frustrated with writing. I'm not getting paid to do this, and the moment it starts to feel like work is the moment I quit (though usually I'm back to it a few hours later, with an idea on how to fix whatever I'd screwed up)

Before noon. My brain just doesn't work in the morning.

lfraser
12-12-2007, 06:39 AM
I go through periods in which I don't write much. Usually that's when I'm very busy at work and at night am only able to crawl into bed and read for a while, although recently I had a health scare, too, and that slowed me down quite a bit.

During the "down" times, I don't stop thinking about my WIP. Often I come back to it after a break with new insights and the writing is really easy for a time. My writing also seems stronger. Then the cycle starts again. It serves me well enough. My WIP is advancing, over 100K words now and still lots of story to tell -- far more story, in fact, than I ever dreamed would spring from the original germ of an idea. And I'm not in any hurry, since the whole thing is a learning process.

seun
12-12-2007, 04:08 PM
I never have company, thereby negating the need for troublesome social niceties.

I have company sometimes. But then I just ignore them. :)

ACEnders
12-14-2007, 09:52 PM
When I'm with my husband. He travels a lot, and does a lot of work from home. During those times, I write like crazy. But when he's home, all I want to do is spend time with him.

I write at work, and about every other spare minute I have.

III
12-14-2007, 09:55 PM
Chalk up another "Whenever I don't feel like it"

truelyana
12-14-2007, 09:57 PM
Yeah. When I don't feel like it.

Me too. :D

JLCwrites
12-14-2007, 10:06 PM
I agree with Shady, SF, and True.

larocca
12-14-2007, 10:22 PM
I write whenever the mood strikes me -- shades of otterman's sex comment -- and I don't write the rest of the time. I'm a firm believer in Hemingway's "long periods of thinking, short periods of writing" mantra, and tell myself it's okay not to write all the time. I'm often thinking about what I'm going to write the next time I do it. Sometimes I even scribble notes. Other times, I'm as far from writing as the rest of Earth's inhabitants. Sounds lazy, doesn't it? But in fact, I'm in the mood almost every day, and I wrote my NaNoWriMo thingy in 7 days. So I write when I write. Clear as mud, innit?

maxmordon
12-14-2007, 10:38 PM
When I don't feel inspired

larocca
12-14-2007, 10:45 PM
And I needed 20+ years to give myself permission to say what you just did. Max!

maxmordon
12-14-2007, 10:51 PM
"Un buen escritor expresa grandes cosas con pequeñas palabras; a la inversa del mal escritor, que dice cosas insignificantes con palabras grandiosas." (A good writer says great things with simple words, unlike a bad writer, who says unimportant matters with gradiose words) -Ernesto Sábato

Arisa81
12-15-2007, 08:23 AM
I don't write on weekends unless we're not doing anything else. But weekends for us are when we go out, do things, spend time together. I sometimes write in the evenings on weekends though.

And as for birthdays (like mine and the bf's) and Christmas, other holidays etc. I just don't write because the day is busy!

Claudia Gray
12-15-2007, 08:54 AM
I am having difficulty sticking with things the last couple of weeks. I know that this is because I just got better after a couple months of bad health and surgery; basically, my brain really wants to goof off for a bit, and no wonder. I am consoling myself that it's Christmastime -- never the most productive few weeks anyway -- and that once January comes, I'll probably be in a much better zone to hunker down and start work on my third book, Hourglass.

Mandy-Jane
12-15-2007, 11:01 AM
When I'm drunk.

Or when I'm tired.

Or if I only have a couple of minutes before I have to go out somewhere. I can't just start something and then leave it. I have to devote real time to it.

seun
12-15-2007, 06:38 PM
Or if I only have a couple of minutes before I have to go out somewhere. I can't just start something and then leave it. I have to devote real time to it.

That's me exactly. I know I have less than an hour now before I have to turn the computer off and do stuff I can't get out of (I'm editing at the moment rather than actually writing). If I was writing properly, it would piss me off to think I have to stop so soon.

Emily Winslow
12-15-2007, 09:17 PM
I couldn't write during either of my pregnancies (and my mother, an artist, tells me she couldn't paint during any of her pregnancies).

Day to day, I can only write when I have a block of child-free time at least several hours long. My husband has staggered his work schedule to make sure I have several of those each week. During one of them each week, I write 3000 new words. During the rest, I edit previous sections, plan next week's 3000 word section, and catch up on the practicalities of life (bills, etc.).

I never thought I would be that organized about it but, with the ages of our children, I've had to become so. I simply can't write without the certainty that the time is guaranteed--can't write while the baby is napping, for example, if I'm the one "on call" to get him when he wakes up. (I suppose I could learn to, if I had to, but luckily we were able to work out our schedules to accommodate me.)

jannawrites
12-16-2007, 08:25 AM
I try not to write when company's over. :D

I know this strays from Seun's original question but... company inevitably comes over last minute on the days I'm going to get down and serious about my WIP.

KTC
12-16-2007, 08:31 AM
I'm always writing. I do go through periods where I won't write poetry. I don't know why...they just come to me. Otherwise, I'm always writing something.

Simple Living
12-17-2007, 03:26 AM
I try not to write on Sundays. Just to mentally give myself a day off. That being stated, I couldn't wait until Monday and wrote 1,200 words at about 10:00pm last night...

Same here. I don't write on Sundays. I think it's a good idea to give your mind and body a break. Every body needs rest. Balance is important.

lfraser
12-17-2007, 05:23 AM
[quote=Simple Living;1889168]Same here. I don't write on Sundays. I think it's a good idea to give your mind and body a break. Every body needs rest. Balance is important.

Whereas for me Sunday is usually my main writing day. I often don't even get dressed on Sundays (although in my defense I have a very elegant dressing gown); I just get my coffee, get back into bed, and turn on the laptop. I find that having things to do before I start writing inevitably leads to finding more things to do before I start writing. Workdays are hell on the word count.

Dakota Waters
12-17-2007, 12:37 PM
Lately, everyday.

qf me too. I just think about writing.

And think about soaking all of my hard copies in kerosene, striking a match, and then... well, you get the idea.

WordedWrite
12-17-2007, 08:50 PM
Uh, is this a trick question? Writers are writing all the time. Maybe not at the keyboard or with pen in hand, but always in the head, sometimes subconsiously and even unconsciously. You read the paper, watch or listen to the news, an idea forms; go to the store, see a story happening; see family, friends, pets, more ideas bud. The mind goes through many drafts before it delivers that perfectly awful first written one. There's never a void, just sometimes a fight among ideas for placement (which story will get out first)--and if you don't let that bully of a story out first--the one you'd rather not deal with--your fingers may not be working, but your brain is still revising. That's what makes one a writer. No?

seun
12-18-2007, 02:33 PM
Uh, is this a trick question?

No.

HeronW
12-18-2007, 04:19 PM
Aside from boards and blogs, depression pretty much keeps me from my 4th book.

Kathie Freeman
12-18-2007, 09:08 PM
I try not to write when my husband is around. He's always looking over my shoulder, offering inane suggestions and nit-picking my sentences. He has convinced himself that he co-wrote "Catwalk", but he only skimmed through it once, and doesn't remember half of it.

Emily Winslow
12-18-2007, 09:32 PM
I'm sorry to hear that, Heron. Nothing wrong with taking a break from writing, but depression is no fun. I wish you well.


Aside from boards and blogs, depression pretty much keeps me from my 4th book.

Simple Living
12-18-2007, 10:58 PM
[quote]


Whereas for me Sunday is usually my main writing day. I often don't even get dressed on Sundays (although in my defense I have a very elegant dressing gown); I just get my coffee, get back into bed, and turn on the laptop. I find that having things to do before I start writing inevitably leads to finding more things to do before I start writing. Workdays are hell on the word count.

Your Sundays sound luxurious and something to look forward to! :Sun:
I think the day of the week people choose for their day of rest is unimportant, but, for the sake of balance, I think people really should have one.

I enjoy writing a lot. It's never a chore for me, whatever stage of it I'm in. But that's the reason I need balance. I find that when I let myself go and let writing become too prevalent, I become unbalanced in other areas of my life. Sure, my writing flourishes, but, contrary to popular writer-belief, writing is not the be-all, end-all. I understand the need to meet deadlines and, certainly, there are times for exceptions. However, in general, it's important to keep our lives, as a whole, well... whole. Especially when it comes to relationships and our health.

Mud Dauber
12-18-2007, 11:39 PM
Or if I only have a couple of minutes before I have to go out somewhere. I can't just start something and then leave it. I have to devote real time to it.
Unfortunately, this is when some of my best story-related epiphanies have surfaced. Really!

scarletpeaches
12-18-2007, 11:41 PM
...contrary to popular writer-belief, writing is not the be-all, end-all...it's important to keep our lives, as a whole, well... whole. Especially when it comes to relationships and our health.

In my case, writing certainly is the be-all and end-all. It is the thing that keeps me whole, that's entirely my own. I don't have a relationship and my physical health has never really been an issue. Mental health on the other hand? If I didn't write, I'd have cracked up long since.

Simple Living
12-19-2007, 12:41 AM
In my case, writing certainly is the be-all and end-all. It is the thing that keeps me whole, that's entirely my own. I don't have a relationship and my physical health has never really been an issue. Mental health on the other hand? If I didn't write, I'd have cracked up long since.

I guess I could have clarified my thoughts on that a bit. By relationships, I meant with everyone - family and friends included. No person can go through life completely alone. We all need relationships and to risk the ones we have by neglecting them to write constantly, isn't healthy.

I'm glad you're in good health. I pray it continues. There are a lot of writers, though, who spend many hours, regularly, at a time in front of a computer without regard for their health. Eyes strain, hands and wrists are subjected to carpal tunnel and other ailments without taking appropriate breaks to curb the chances. Then there's the slouching, lack of stretching, etc., not to mention the other sicknesses people are already dealing with.

Writing is only the be-all, end-all, if a person makes it that. But, writing at the expense of everything else, and not living life, isn't good. It's not balanced. It's all about balance. I write a lot, but I also spend time with family and friends, have hobbies, get out of the house, take care of myself, etc. Writing is one of my favorite things to do, but that's not to be confused with being the "be all, end all."

scarletpeaches
12-19-2007, 12:52 AM
Oh of course, I'm only speaking for myself. And if a relationship ever does develop at some point in my life (I mean with an S/O of course) then they would have to understand how important writing is to me. It was there first, after all. When it comes to family - I don't have one. Friends - few. But I go for quality over quantity and they all understand that I write, it's what I do. Not that my writing imposes on them in any way, or that it limits my contact with them; they just accept that it's an inherent part of me, just as I accept their passions are part of them.

Eye strain and so on? Yep. I get migraines. No, not caused by the computer; I'd get them anyway and think, "I know I'm due another migraine soon; might as well do what I'm doing if it's already decided it's on its way." I can write and get a migraine or not write and still get a migraine, so it's six and two threes, really. But posture is always a subject of which we should be aware.

When it comes to hobbies, though...all of my favourites are related to writing. When I'm not writing I feel like I should be, ought to be, want to be. Even when at the cinema, I feel that it's feeding my creativity. It's all I want to do. Not that I'm one-dimensional. Just that writing is my default setting. Slice me open and 'writing' goes all the way through.

Jeez. I really am being a pretentious tit today.

Emily Winslow
12-19-2007, 01:02 PM
Hi, Simple Living! I must say that I agree with you (though I'm agreeing personally, and of course Scarlet Peaches and others are entitled to enjoy their lives however they wish!)

I find that I need "real life" not only to enjoy myself fully in general, but also for my writing. My relationships with husband, children, siblings, parents, friends, neighbors, and acquaintances challenge me again and again to understand the people around me, and the epiphanies that pop out from those interactions become the stuff I write about.

The time it takes to live a well-balanced life supports my writing, rather than detracting from it.



Your Sundays sound luxurious and something to look forward to!
I think the day of the week people choose for their day of rest is unimportant, but, for the sake of balance, I think people really should have one.

I enjoy writing a lot. It's never a chore for me, whatever stage of it I'm in. But that's the reason I need balance. I find that when I let myself go and let writing become too prevalent, I become unbalanced in other areas of my life. Sure, my writing flourishes, but, contrary to popular writer-belief, writing is not the be-all, end-all. I understand the need to meet deadlines and, certainly, there are times for exceptions. However, in general, it's important to keep our lives, as a whole, well... whole. Especially when it comes to relationships and our health.