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AnnieColleen
11-30-2007, 02:28 AM
Using Microsoft Word's thesaurus, I just found "lissom" as a synonym for "slender".

Microsoft Word's spell-check now informs me that "lissom" is mis-spelled. (Come to find out, so does Firefox's spell-check.)

Impressive!

JoNightshade
11-30-2007, 02:32 AM
I always thought that word was spelled lithesome. Does that work? Lissom may be an unrecognized alternate spelling.

blacbird
11-30-2007, 02:35 AM
Both spellings are accepted in dictionaries I've seen (the, like, physical book-like things, yanno?).

caw

BenPanced
11-30-2007, 02:38 AM
Both spellings are accepted in dictionaries I've seen (the, like, physical book-like things, yanno?).

caw
...

"book"?

What is this "book" thing of which you speak?

andrewhollinger
11-30-2007, 03:40 AM
I've never seen "lissom," only "lissome."

Although, for my money I'd use "slender" or "thin." Who wants to open a dictionary? :-)

AnnieColleen
11-30-2007, 04:04 AM
Lissome was what the spell-check suggested.

I'm not terribly worried about it either way; I just had 'slender' twice in close proximity and wanted to change one so it wouldn't distract me while I went on with the scene. It was just odd that the two parts of the program disagreed with each other!

Namatu
11-30-2007, 04:36 AM
I think it's "lissome" too. Although when you look at the word closely, it looks funny. I love when words look funny. Makes me want to find out where it originated.

Words I ran into recently in a book I read (author obviously drunk on thesaurus): crepuscule and nictitating. There was a third in close proximity (these were within two pages of each other), but my brain has blocked it out. These words were used for scenes from the POV of a character who had only finished eighth grade and was not presented as well-educated or anything near to it. I would have thrown it against the wall, but I had to remember how to spell "nictitating" so I could look it up in my super large dictionary.

KTC
11-30-2007, 04:46 AM
they have physical book dictionaries now!?



peep peep

JRH
11-30-2007, 08:29 PM
Any of the 3 spellings, (lissome, lissom, or lithesome) would be considered correct although "lithesome" appears to be the preferred adjectival form of "lithe" and the other two are simply alternates.

What I don't understand is why they would be using any of them as synonyms for "slender", as they mean "nimble" or "easily flexed", not "thin", or "gracefully slight".

And, for the record, printed Dictionaries, and Thesauruses not only exist, they're far more reliable than any found in programs, (and most "Spell Checkers" would be knocked out of "National Spelling Bees" in the first round).

JRH

Namatu
11-30-2007, 09:45 PM
they have physical book dictionaries now!?
My physical book dictionary is awesome. It was published before World War II and contains not only definitions but word origins and a history of the world!

When I brought it home, long ago, my parents took one look and said, "Why?" The answer was obvious to me: none of the other kids had one.

ResearchGuy
11-30-2007, 10:36 PM
My physical book dictionary is awesome. It was published before World War II and contains not only definitions but word origins and a history of the world!

When I brought it home, long ago, my parents took one look and said, "Why?" The answer was obvious to me: none of the other kids had one.
Among my earliest memories (age 3 or so) are those of being around my father as he pored over reference books in compiling and refining the etymologies (word histories) for the first edition of Webster's New World Dictionary of the American Language. He was etymological editor through the next couple of editions, until his death in 1991. The New World went on to become a widely used standard among college dictionaries.

FWIW.

--Ken

Maryn
12-01-2007, 12:46 AM
I have a very strong preference for print dictionaries and thesauruses. Why, I can reach three dictionaries and two thesauruses from where I sit! Word and online versions are fine for when the word or correct spelling has just slipped away momentarily, but they're strictly not to be trusted. (lissom/e as slender? Ha! This is a crossword puzzle word and they never use a clue meaning slimness.)

Maryn, deeply in love with her hardbound Roget's

ResearchGuy
12-01-2007, 01:12 AM
. . .
Maryn, deeply in love with her hardbound Roget's
Some time take a look into the Oxford American Writer's Thesaurus.

You'll like it.

--Ken

JoNightshade
12-01-2007, 01:22 AM
I use the online Thesaurus at dictionary.com because usually I'm just trying to remind myself of "What was that word that kind of means [whatever]?"

But yeah, for actual definitions... my 50 year old webster's, thank you very much.

andrewhollinger
12-01-2007, 10:58 AM
Because I'm still a university student, I've got access to the main library's online version of the O.E.D. complete with, what?, 650,000 entries or so.

But I only use that if I'm interested in etymology or evolution, or I'm reading a really old text.

I'll add to the consensus, however, that I like the physical books better than WWW. I think it's something to do with it being a tactile object. I can carry it from room to room--even my favorite reading throne (*wink*).

Sage
12-01-2007, 11:27 AM
I like dictionary.com too, because of the ease with which I can go from a thesaurus to a dictionary to make sure that word really means what the thesaurus implies it means.

More fun with Word. I like how it suggested "one more minute" should be "one minuter."

JimmyB27
12-01-2007, 04:31 PM
I'll add to the consensus, however, that I like the physical books better than WWW. I think it's something to do with it being a tactile object. I can carry it from room to room--even my favorite reading throne (*wink*).
I can carry my laptop from room to room, even the aforementioned reading throne. Hell, for all you know, I could be typing at you from there right now :tongue (I'm not).

With regards to online vs paper dictionaries, you guys might find this interesting - http://www.ted.com/index.php/talks/view/id/161
It's a video of a talk by a lexicographer, about new ways of creating and presenting the dictionary. Very interesting, and she's pretty funny too.