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View Full Version : Amazon's Digital Text Platform: A new self-publishing option for e-books



Dusk
11-21-2007, 03:28 AM
Details here (http://forums.digitaltextplatform.com/dtpforums/entry.jspa?externalID=113&categoryID=2). Full details here (http://forums.digitaltextplatform.com/dtpforums/index.jspa), including FAQ and some forums that are getting lively.

This is a new site that will allow self-publishers to publish their books in the AZW format that is used only at Amazon for its Kindle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amazon_Kindle) e-books. Until now, only e-books in the Mobipocket format could be sold at Amazon. There are rumors around the blogosphere that Amazon will shut down Mobipocket, because Kindle e-books are clearly intended as an alternative to Mobipocket. Since self-publishers could already work with Mobipocket (https://www.mobipocket.com/ebookbase/en/Homepage/pub_info.asp), the only practical difference this change makes is that Amazon's new Digital Text Platform (that's its awkward name for self-publishing e-books at its Kindle store) is clearly modelled after Lulu.com (http://www.lulu.com/). It's user-friendly and is aimed at self-publishers, though it could certainly be used by small presses.

Amazon keeps 65% of the profit. By contrast, Lulu asks for 20% of the profit for e-books. There are no set-up fees at either service.

As with Mobipocket and Amazon's POD self-publishing service CreateSpace (http://www.createspace.com/), you don't need an ISBN; Amazon will assign you an Amazon-only reference number.

One nice thing I notice about the Support section is that Amazon provides detailed suggestions on formatting your e-book, prior to uploading.

Potential nastiness in the fine print (http://forums.digitaltextplatform.com/dtpforums/entry.jspa?externalID=2&categoryID=12):

1) You have to have a valid US bank account, and Amazon withholds taxes from your profit.

2) You can't sell the e-book for a different price elsewhere than the list price you set at Amazon.

3) They say they can sell the book at any price they want; however, they emphasize that you'll still get 35% of the list price you set.

4) They can make chapters available free online for readers to browse.

5) They say that you give them a nonexclusive irrevocable license to sell the book; however, the next clause implies that this can be terminated. Except: "All rights to Digital Books acquired by customers prior to termination shall survive termination, and Amazon shall be entitled to retain archival copies of the Licensed Digital Content after termination in order to provide re-downloads to customers who have purchase Digital Books prior to termination." Fair enough.

6) "You acknowledge that we will be entitled to utilize DRM technology in connection with the distribution of Digital Books but are not obligated to do so." In actual fact, Kindle's AZW format is DRM-protected.

7) There's no specific mention of erotic content or other controversial content in the terms of conditions (just the usual don't-upload-anything-illegal clause), but this FAQ (http://forums.digitaltextplatform.com/dtpforums/thread.jspa?threadID=7&tstart=0) leaves that issue open.

[Edited to correct Amazon's cut of the profit.]

arodriguez
11-29-2007, 02:30 PM
Cnet did an an article concernimg this
http://www.news.com/2100-1025-6219129.html

sony has a competing device, but they both are expensive.

Jacob Spire
01-26-2008, 10:47 PM
Is it alright to give them my bank information and Social Security number?

Mu lawyer (fine, my mother. She's a lawyer, ok?) firmly claims I should not put any information on the net, lest I fall prey to one of the accursed False Identity Scams.

Is it safe, then?

Dai Alanye
01-27-2008, 08:19 AM
1) You have to have a valid US bank account, and Amazon withholds taxes from your profit.

2) You can't sell the e-book for a different price elsewhere than the list price you set at Amazon.

3) They say they can sell the book at any price they want; however, they emphasize that you'll still get 35% of the list price you set.

That Jeff Bezos is one generous fella.

I'll bet they don't have a reasonable audit clause.