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View Full Version : Sesame Street not for kids anymore?



Sheryl Nantus
11-20-2007, 11:00 PM
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/18/magazine/18wwln-medium-t.html

I feel so... old...

:cry:

Siddow
11-20-2007, 11:03 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PH79jOCQc6Q

Oh yeah! Not work safe, people, but funny.

jenngreenleaf
11-20-2007, 11:06 PM
Wow . . . I feel old, too. I never really made those connections or thought about the negativity this article describes as issues. Hmm. :Shrug:

Kadea
11-20-2007, 11:21 PM
I stopped letting my children watch Sesame Street when they started the parade of terminal illnesses through... AIDS, Cancer, etc. My reasons are this: Children at that age should try to maintain SOME innocence and don't need to know how sad the world can be. 3 and 4 year olds don't need to be asking those questions. There will be a time and a place for it.

Note:
For anyone reading this who doesn't know me... I lost my mother to Cancer when I was barely an adult and I still have never mentioned the word "Cancer" to my children (age 4 and 5). I don't want Sesame Street teaching my children about Cancer... that is my job.

DonnaDuck
11-20-2007, 11:27 PM
It's funny, I just posted this as it's own thread not 5 minutes ago, with the exact same article. Yahoo mail for you too? Heehee.

Anyway, I just think it's a sign that we're becoming way too PC for our own good and building generation after generation of squishy children that have the deluded notion that they're special and can do anything when that's not the reality of it. When I was younger, you had to try out for a baseball team and not all kids made it (I did, into an all-boys league no less!). Now everyone makes it up until a certain league, regardless of talent. Now I'm not saying screaming YOU SUCK to the kid is something to do but what happened? The kid couldn't hit a beachball and you're letting him on the team because "everyone wins"? I'm sorry, no. You can coddle a child but a line needs to be drawn somewhere. Kids shouldn't be harbored in a sensitivity bubble but the shouldn't be exposed to harsh reality either. So Oscar needed an upper adn Cookie Monster should have had adult onset diabetes. I loved Cookie Monster and I remember his pipe-eating skits and never once did I ever get the urge to eat a pipe. I doubt kids that young would even know what it is. I also used to play with bubble gum cigarettes too, the kind that puffed smoke and amazingly enough, I'm not a smoker. I think as a society we've gotten way too soft on children and we're getting this generation of very selfish, the world bows to me, I am special to everyone kids. We need a happy medium between reality and fantasy because this world of fantasy that we've developed for our kids, I think, is only hurting them.

Shadow_Ferret
11-20-2007, 11:29 PM
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/18/magazine/18wwln-medium-t.html

I feel so... old...

:cry:You feel old? I'm even too old for Seseme Street.

J. R. Tomlin
11-20-2007, 11:30 PM
Kadea, I lost my father to cancer so I can understand it being a sensitive subject, but you do realize that at some point (probably already) your kids will hear the word?

I loved the old grimmer Sesame Street. I'm going right out to buy it. :)

Kadea
11-20-2007, 11:36 PM
Oh, totally!

I just want to be VERY careful about how it gets introduced to them, and I don't think that Sesame can do it in a couple minute segment.

sunna
11-20-2007, 11:38 PM
Yep, I posted about this a few days ago too!

I don't really get it. I loved Sesame Street; it was my favorite show as a kid. I think it's a big part of the reason I read so early, and was so into creative projects as a kid. Plus, as a backwoods Mainer kid, I got to learn about different cultures and city living, which certainly wasn't covered in the schools back then. I don't eat pipes, I'm not cookie-obsessed (well, not very) and I never f'gossakes wondered if Oscar needed a psychotropic drug.

I'm planning on buying the DVDs for my 1 1/2 y/o niece for her birthday. It never occurred to me to ask her mom if that was ok.


Just makes me sad, and baffled.