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smnoreen
11-13-2007, 09:53 AM
Hi there!! I am in the process of writng a book on having and raising twins/multiples. When I was pregnant there was little info written by people who had actually had multiples...it was all done by dr's, who had never really had any major experiance with multiples. What are the chances of being able to do this even though I have no credentials. My book would be like "girlfriends guide to pregnancy" for those who have read it. I found that most of the books on the market were useless except for the diet /nutrition part. So what do you think??? Is it doable??

Thanks for all your feedback and info

Steph

jasperd
11-13-2007, 11:27 AM
I'm no professional either but it sounds like a great idea. Especially since there's no market for it yet. Vicki Iovinne (Girlfriends Guide To Pregnancy) is an attorney and a writer. She's not a medical proffesional but she clearly states that in her book. I think it's refreshing to read a book that's written in laymans terms. Good luck!

Mandy-Jane
11-13-2007, 11:38 AM
I guess anything is doable if you're committed enough and do all the right research. But how credible will it be when people realise that (a) you're not a doctor and (b) you have no personal experience with twins or multiples? Unless of course you plan on interviewing people who have had experience.

I hope it works out for you. Good luck.

Lauri B
11-14-2007, 12:40 AM
Hi smnoreen,
I think you'll find that in the last 5 years or so, lots of books about being pregnant with, and raising, multiples have been published. What you'll need to do is find a way to make yours stand out from the others. I agree with Mandy-Jane that you'll have to figure out a way to raise your credibility (being the parent of multiples is definite credibility, but you may need to have a co-author who has an MD, PhD, etc.).
Good luck!

Lavinia
11-14-2007, 02:02 AM
Credentials? Raising multiples is a credential! I would focus on your experience after having the multiples. I imagine that there are experiences that women who have a single birth do not have. Focus on those. If you belong to any organization or could join one, begin to gather material from other mothers of multiples; that will help you to offer your reader lots of information, and keys that perhaps you would not have thought of. But before all that--march yourself down to all of your local bookstores and spend a lot of time looking for the books that are your competition. Read them and take notes. Then describe "your" book to the clerk, as if you are looking for that book now. See what is already out there. Order then, check them out from the library...whatever you must do and then after reading them, you should have a good idea of how to make your book stand out.

I think your idea is a great one. Figure out a way to make it stand out from the rest, create it with strong writing, and it'll be a success. Good luck!

~Karen

Lauri B
11-14-2007, 02:44 AM
I agree that raising multiples is a credential, but unfortunately, the publishing world usually requires an "expert" to chime in if the author doesn't have a bunch of letters after his or he name.

eodmatt
11-14-2007, 03:12 AM
God save us from "experts". When I was married to my ex, we had one child, a daughter. She now has a child of her own, a son. Mother, Father and Son are all doing well. Ex wife is frazzled to the core with worry, concern, health warnings - the list is endless. Thank God dear Daughter didn't have two little darlings. Anyone who can write a clear, concise book about bringing up multiple little savages should also write a book for young parents subjected to the interference and grand-maternal concern of an aging Tyrannosaurus granny.

tombookpub
11-14-2007, 04:59 AM
Edomatt: Too much information!! Calm down, it's just a bulletin board! Whew!!!!

smnoreen
11-14-2007, 08:17 AM
I do have experiance....I have three year old twins

Mandy-Jane
11-14-2007, 08:37 AM
Good luck with it then. I guess I misread your post and assumed you hadn't had experience. Hope it's a great book!

sgunelius
11-14-2007, 06:42 PM
As the mother of 3-year old triplets, I can definitely say that there are very few helpful books on the market about raising triplets, but in my searches over the past 3-4 years, I have found many more about twins. I'm not saying they were helpful, because having triplets is a totally different ball game (you're outnumbered from the start), so I didn't read the books about having twins.

With that said, I definitely think there is a need for helpful books on raising multiples, but it's also a small niche market. I think that's where the challenge comes into play and books with "experts in the field" like doctors are picked up by publishers faster than those without those kinds of co-authors. I don't agree with it because unless you've been pregnant with multiples, I could care less what you have to say, but publishers seem to think a medical degree is really important in this area.

I definitely think there is a market for this type of book (I've thought of writing one in the future myself), but with the current mindset of needing an expert on the book jacket, I think you need to establish yourself as an expert by publishing articles, speaking engagements, etc. Become involved in (and possibly get key positions with) national support organizations (or start your own). If you can show in your proposal how your book is different from what's on the market and why it doesn't require a medical person's name attached to it as well as why you are THE person to write it, then I think you have a shot. Establish a platform then go for it!

Good luck!

ResearchGuy
11-14-2007, 11:58 PM
. . . So what do you think??? Is it doable??
. . .
ResearchGuy says "Go for it."

Interview doctors regarding any medical issues you address. As for the rest (which should be most of the book -- managing the demands of multiples, stress, scheduling, feeding, practical stuff like rassling multiple munchkins into the car for shopping and errands, sitters, etc., etc., etc.), you and others in your shoes are (in my humble opinion) far more qualified and far more interesting than any medical doctor.

Your own experience + extensive interviews + reading what you can find in quality magazines and journals (and again, + doctors regarding any medical issues as such) should be ample. Add good writing and you are there.

The missing element is platform. Involvement in groups and organizations, speaking, and writing articles can help build that.

BTW, if you can write in a way that also draws in those simply curious about the experience, or who want to experience the I'm glad that is not ME sensation, so much the better. I would not be surprised if what you have to say might also be of interest to parents with kids who are closely spaced--a year or so apart, say, or maybe even closer on account of remarriages or other situations--but not twins, triplets, etc. You might want to keep that angle in mind, too.

BTW, FWIW, I have written for publication on everything from killer bees to ferrets to regional social/economic statistics, technology in schools, and indoor mold without any specific credentials in any of those topics -- just a lot of detailed research and, where needed, interviews. It was work for hire for a government policy shop, but some of it widely read.

--Ken

P.S. When you are far enough along and have a killer query ready (and full book proposal in your back pocket), let me know. I will refer you to an agent I know if it looks like you are ready and credible. Email me (if you want) for his tips on book queries (he prepared a list for use in a presentation to one of my writers groups). He specializes in nonfiction and I think your topic would fit his interests IF you have the platform thing in hand by then.

eodmatt
11-15-2007, 12:13 AM
Edomatt: Too much information!! Calm down, it's just a bulletin board! Whew!!!!


Sorry! http://absolutewrite.com/forums/images/icons/icon12.gif

ritinrider
11-15-2007, 03:05 AM
Had to log in so I could give you my .02, aren't you lucky? :D


Hi there!! I am in the process of writng a book on having and raising twins/multiples. When I was pregnant there was little info written by people who had actually had multiples...it was all done by dr's, who had never really had any major experiance with multiples. What are the chances of being able to do this even though I have no credentials. My book would be like "girlfriends guide to pregnancy" for those who have read it. I found that most of the books on the market were useless except for the diet /nutrition part. So what do you think??? Is it doable??

Thanks for all your feedback and info

Steph


What do doctors know anyway? They change their thinking every couple of years. My first reaction is, go for it. Having read through the posts my reaction is the same. It sounds completely doable, and salable. Also, if you want/need to include information from the 'old days' feel free to contact me. My twins are 32, and we didn't know we were having twins until moments before the second one was born. Surprise, surprise! Also, I have a friend who's twins are 19. She not only didn't have them early, they went a week past their due date. I thought that was unheard of for twins.


I'm no professional either but it sounds like a great idea. Especially since there's no market for it yet. Vicki Iovinne (Girlfriends Guide To Pregnancy) is an attorney and a writer.

Thank you for naming that book. I've been trying to think of the name of it for a friend of mine. Now, finally, I can tell her what I'm referring to.


Then describe "your" book to the clerk, as if you are looking for that book now. See what is already out there. Order then, check them out from the library...whatever you must do and then after reading them, you should have a good idea of how to make your book stand out.

~Karen

This is an excellent idea.


ResearchGuy says "Go for it."

Interview doctors regarding any medical issues you address. As for the rest (which should be most of the book -- managing the demands of multiples, stress, scheduling, feeding, practical stuff like rassling multiple munchkins into the car for shopping and errands, sitters, etc., etc., etc.), you and others in your shoes are (in my humble opinion) far more qualified and far more interesting than any medical doctor.

Yep, he's right. IF, in the end after you've written it the only way you can get an editor or agent interested then you might consider asking a doctor to co-write it with you. Of course, then you'll have to split the proceeds with him. I have a book about writing by a man who wrote several diet books, back before every celebrity had a diet book out. I think his name was Solomon, but I don't remember and my books aren't accessible right now. Anyway, in the book he explained how he approached the doctors, and how they split the proceeds. It seems like the Doctor got something like 10% or so and his name on a book for doing very little. So, if you have to maybe you could do that.


Your own experience + extensive interviews + reading what you can find in quality magazines and journals (and again, + doctors regarding any medical issues as such) should be ample. Add good writing and you are there.

The missing element is platform. Involvement in groups and organizations, speaking, and writing articles can help build that.

Right, I don't see building the platform as being too difficult. Except, of course, for finding time to do it. :)


BTW, if you can write in a way that also draws in those simply curious about the experience, or who want to experience the I'm glad that is not ME sensation, so much the better. I would not be surprised if what you have to say might also be of interest to parents with kids who are closely spaced--a year or so apart, say, or maybe even closer on account of remarriages or other situations--but not twins, triplets, etc. You might want to keep that angle in mind, too.

This is also a good point. Although there doesn't have to be another marriage, it's probably more common, but sometimes mom's just have their kids closer together than they'd planned. There were 14 months between my husband and his little sister. My mother-in-law often comments on the difficulty of two babies at the same time. And she had 2 older children, so she knew the difference. Also, my younger brothers were born 11 months apart. I think RG is right and this is a good angle to add to your book, IF it fits with your idea.

Plus, he's right about the curious. Sometimes when my daughter (the mother of an active 18 month old, and sister of said twins) the first words out of her mouth are "how did you do this with two of these?"

smnoreen
11-19-2007, 07:09 AM
Thanks for everyones feed back. I have been working on it for a while now. When I found out that I was having two I read everything under the sun about having and raising twins, but when I brought them home those books were worthless. I thought that I could write a book from the practical "I have changed too many poopies to count" kind of way.

bookfreakguy
11-20-2007, 05:29 PM
Good luck with your book. My only question would be how big is your market? I honestly don't know, but if your goal is to sell a ton of books, you may want to check that out. I know there's been a sharp rise in multiple births in recent years, but is it enough to make it worth your while - and enough to make it worthwhile for a publisher? Obviously, anybody without multiples isn't going to be interested in it. Just something to look into. Best of luck!!!

Lauri B
11-20-2007, 05:48 PM
I second bookfreak on this. The parenting market is incredibly crowded, so do your research carefully and make sure your book offers something different from whatever else is out there. Good luck!

ResearchGuy
11-21-2007, 01:46 AM
Good luck with your book. My only question would be how big is your market? I honestly don't know, but if your goal is to sell a ton of books, you may want to check that out. I know there's been a sharp rise in multiple births in recent years, but is it enough to make it worth your while - and enough to make it worthwhile for a publisher? Obviously, anybody without multiples isn't going to be interested in it. Just something to look into. Best of luck!!!
A good prospect of selling a few thousand copies is enough to interest a commercial publisher. Most commercially published books sell only in the low thousands.

A well written book (very well written and very well researched) on the topic could be of interest to other parents, not just those with twins or triplets (or quads, quints). Closely-spaced children for any reason (a topic mentioned earlier in this thread). And there could be the element of "I am glad that is not ME" for some readers (schadenfreude). Much depends on bright, engaging writing, especially if decorated with some familiar names.

I think your views are a bit too discouraging.

My opinions, FWIW.

--Ken

Lauri B
11-21-2007, 03:43 AM
A good prospect of selling a few thousand copies is enough to interest a commercial publisher. Most commercially published books sell only in the low thousands.

A well written book (very well written and very well researched) on the topic could be of interest to other parents, not just those with twins or triplets (or quads, quints). Closely-spaced children for any reason (a topic mentioned earlier in this thread). And there could be the element of "I am glad that is not ME" for some readers (schadenfreude). Much depends on bright, engaging writing, especially if decorated with some familiar names.

I think your views are a bit too discouraging.

My opinions, FWIW.

--Ken
I'm not trying to discourage mnoreen at all; I just happen to know the market pretty well, and it's a tough one to break into these days. That said, if she can write a book that offers something unique about parenting (multiples or otherwise) that's especially marketable, she could be in great shape.