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determined2finish
02-23-2005, 07:39 AM
Hi everyone,
As a novice nonfiction writer I would like to read some books on nonfiction writing (ie structure and style, not proposals). Can anyone suggest some helpful titles?

Thanks!

Betty W01
02-23-2005, 08:24 AM
I really liked Feminine Wiles, by Donna Boetig. She tells you how to structure, do leads and endings, use quotes, and come up with ideas (among other things) for women's magazine articles. I also liked a book called Writing Creative Non-Fiction, by Cheney (not the VP <grin>) and Writing Articles About the World Around You, by Marcia Yudkin.

.

Greenwolf103
02-23-2005, 12:09 PM
I can't think of any right now but I'm curious: Are you looking for books on writing nonfiction books or on writing nonfiction period, like articles, essays and such?

determined2finish
02-23-2005, 04:59 PM
Betty: thank you for the suggestions! I'll look them up on Amazon

Greenwolf103: I realize I should clarify my request...I am looking for books on how to write nonfiction books. It seems that so many emphasize the proposal, the agent vs. editor, etc. but so few have any in depth content on the actual structure and writing. Any suggestions are appreciated!!!

Thanks, again.

Sassenach
02-23-2005, 06:14 PM
by James Stewart, Pultizer winner and former Wall Street Journal editor.

ritinrider
02-23-2005, 07:52 PM
Good question Determined. That's one reason I love this place. I can learn all kinds of stuff I didn't even think to ask about.

Nita

Pat~
02-24-2005, 06:38 PM
Here are 3 of my favorite books on writing (and I'm a nonfiction writer as well):

1. ***The First Five Pages, by Noah Lukeman. Awesome book, very readable and less than 200 pp. Talks about style, showing vs. telling, hooks, tone, pacing and progression, and esp. about the importance of the first 5 pages.

2. ***On Writing Well, by William Zinsser. He knows the topic, as this book is a very interesting and engaging read. Talks about style, tone, usage, etc. but also talks about different types of nonfiction writing--interviews, humor, travel, etc.

3. **The Forest for the Trees, by Betsy Lerner. Written as an editor's advice to writers; talks about different types of writers, kind of delving into what makes us tick. Second half is about publishing, all about the process, what editors want, dealing with rejection or publication, etc. Lots of good info between the lines.

These are the 3 I keep on my bookshelf. Hope this helps! --pb

DeePower
02-25-2005, 12:50 AM
The Making of a Bestseller: Success Stories From Authors
and the Editors, Agents and Booksellers Behind Them
By Brian Hill and Dee Power (yes that's me) Dearborn Trade
March 2005

The exciting journey to the top of the bestseller lists, as seen through the eyes of celebrated authors, editors and literary agents. While there are many books on how to write, publish, or market a book, there hasn't been a book that pulls together a comprehensive look at the entire publishing process from the bestseller prospective. The Making of a Bestseller provides a positive, but realistic look at the publishing industry and how bestsellers are born. Who better to tell the story than those who are involved at the very frontlines of publishing?

Dee

Uncarved
02-25-2005, 03:04 AM
I agree that Dee's book is awesome, so is Jenna's "Make a Real Living as a Freelance Writer: How to Win Top Writing Assignments".

Vipersniper
03-13-2005, 03:55 AM
;) I truly believe that you will find the best advice here but this is another source that I think has a list of good books in which to help you. Writers Digest magazine gives great hints on writing. But find what you need to help you but remember this much. I am writing one called Family Tree it is the true story of my wild and wacky family write in the language of the people that you are writing about. In other words do not use fancy words for a person that came from a dirt poor county and has grown up on the farm. Do not stereotype but you cannot do as one classmate did in highschool. For example she was a dear but she was fancy if you know what I mean. She pronounced manure in a French voice manuray or manuree'. This of course was funny but I think you get the point. If you are writing about a person that is a nurse use the terminology of that person. One book that I am getting is about professions and the buzz words that use. Law enforcement and medicine I know but a corporate lawyer I don't.

determined2finish
03-13-2005, 06:12 AM
;)Do not stereotype but you cannot do as one classmate did in highschool. For example she was a dear but she was fancy if you know what I mean. She pronounced manure in a French voice manuray or manuree'... If you are writing about a person that is a nurse use the terminology of that person. .

Judy,
LOL! That classmate sounds like a real character! I hope you are able to use your experience with her in some way with your writing.

As a nurse, it might be to my advantage to try some writing utilizing my medical/nursing knowledge.
Take care.