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View Full Version : Did you ever write a story and become sexually interested in a particular character?



SpookyWriter
10-11-2007, 09:44 AM
Disclaimer: Of course, I could be lying.

I did once. I felt guilty for months.

How does one reconcile the lust of a story character that is part of our reality for a time? I find that sometimes I can become quite involved with my characters, but when is it that a line is drawn between these fictional individuals and our own individual realities.

What I mean is; did your character become more desirable than the real thing? What's more disappointing? Do we write about relationships that are much better than what we experience in real life?

joetrain
10-11-2007, 09:48 AM
when i was younger (re: unmarried) i used to get sexually involved with all sorts of characters i invented. it's a natural thing, spooky. dont be ashamed. but its a little weird that you write it out.

JoNightshade
10-11-2007, 09:53 AM
Um, one of the only reasons I write is because I fall in love with my characters. I'm definitely attracted to my male MCs.

But more desirable than the real thing? Not once I had the real thing, no.

SpookyWriter
10-11-2007, 09:53 AM
when i was younger (re: unmarried) i used to get sexually involved with all sorts of characters i invented. it's a natural thing, spooky. dont be ashamed. but its a little weird that you write it out.
Well as it happens I did become involved with one of my characters. I'm not ashamed to admit it. I just didn't know how other writers dealth with this before.

Voyager
10-11-2007, 09:53 AM
I only write characters I'm sexually interested in in the first place

SpookyWriter
10-11-2007, 09:55 AM
I only write characters I'm sexually interested in in the first placeI write horror/suspense. I'm afraid of my characters sometimes.

ottorino
10-11-2007, 09:56 AM
I got a boner once while writing a scene between and alien mammaryte and my low-life protagonist. And I'm not ashamed at all.

ottorino
10-11-2007, 09:56 AM
I write horror/suspense. I'm afraid of my characters sometimes.

Hah, that's funny. I'm afraid of you!

Voyager
10-11-2007, 09:58 AM
I write dark fantasy, and if we're being perfectly frank, I always fall for the characters who are the worst of the bad guys. I think I'm the only person that has a thing for Az's Nicoli. The badder, the more irredeemable, the better. Rose can tell you the same thing. I like em evil. Just not in my house.

joetrain
10-11-2007, 10:01 AM
can't say that i have. however, i was once guilty of putting a woman i was involved with in my story, which turned out lousy. and i did idealize her as a person and a lover.

but ive never really had any character sex involvement since, mostly because my characters usually end up unattractive-ish, existentially speaking (they're all damn good looking). my lack of arousal could be because i'm not a good enough writer to get that hot-n-bothered over a character, but also, when i see my characters with the surgeon's eye, see their needs, pain, pride and chaos, i have a hard time looking at them sexually through my own eyes.

joetrain
10-11-2007, 10:02 AM
I got a boner once while writing a scene between and alien mammaryte and my low-life protagonist.

this may be the best thing i've read all night.

joetrain
10-11-2007, 10:05 AM
btw, since that lousy story (which was a novel) i haven't attempted a sex scene. that could also have something to do with it, but, come to think of it, writing a hot sex scene may be a good exercise for me these days. i just got done reading 100 yrs of solitude. i loved the way he wrote sex. turned me on over and over.

WVWriterGirl
10-11-2007, 10:13 AM
I've not become attracted to one of my characters, but I did get exceptionally emotionally attached (no, not like that, either...)

I once hated one of my characters so much for his actions that a fellow I worked with who "looked like him" became the object of my hatred. He walked up to me at work one day while we were waiting on an elevator and just said "Hi" to me, and I said, "Don't talk to me, D, I'm VERY mad at you right now." He wondered what he'd done, and I had the very uncomfortable job of explaining misplaced anger, and how he looked like a rather nasty character I was writing. He laughed it off, luckily.

Gray Rose
10-11-2007, 10:55 AM
I write dark fantasy, and if we're being perfectly frank, I always fall for the characters who are the worst of the bad guys. I think I'm the only person that has a thing for Az's Nicoli. The badder, the more irredeemable, the better. Rose can tell you the same thing. I like em evil. Just not in my house.

Yep. If I didn't fall for my characters, it would be impossible for me to write. I think of my writing as playacting: I am an actor playing every single one of them (well, except Loreena, I cannot stomach her). I have to feel their desires, all of them, sexual or otherwise. This is what makes me love my WIP so damn much.

And yes, some of those people are villains in the traditional sense of the word. Voyager, I don't think you are alone in falling for villains :)

Better than the real thing? This is the real thing. Writing is what we do.

Oh, you mean, better than the real life relationships? Nope. My RL relationships are cardinally different from what I write about.

MelodyO
10-11-2007, 11:25 AM
Good heavens, I write my male characters with every single aspect of masculinity that turns me on. Otherwise, what's the point? So is it a good thing that I'm writing about a sarcastic fallen angel who has done very bad things yet is still redeemable PLUS wears his hair in a ponytail? My husband sure thinks so. :D

maestrowork
10-11-2007, 11:30 AM
I ain't gonna kiss and tell.

J. R. Tomlin
10-11-2007, 11:32 AM
I have found one of my male characters attractive, but I find the idea of ONLY writing male characters who I find attractive very strange. That would make a pretty narrow range of characters in my books.

Mostly no. But there was that one exception. :)

cletus
10-11-2007, 01:17 PM
Yes. But I had to kill her when I found out she was cheating on me with the protagonist.

JohnDavidPaxton
10-11-2007, 01:37 PM
Only when I write about my father.

Marlys
10-11-2007, 03:47 PM
Yeah, once. We tried to make it work--went out a few times, but I got tired of always being the one who paid. I broke up with him, but for some reason he was obsessed with what he saw as my stunning beauty and vivacious personality, so he started stalking me. He wasn't very good at it, because I could predict exactly what he was going to do next, but it was annoying enough that I considered changing my name and moving to another state. Then I thought, 'WTF?' and instead changed his name and moved him to another state. And gave him herpes.

Azraelsbane
10-11-2007, 03:57 PM
I think I'm the only person that has a thing for Az's Nicoli. The badder, the more irredeemable, the better. Rose can tell you the same thing. I like em evil. Just not in my house.

Nah, it's not just you. My husband would totally leave me for Nikoli if he was real. I can see him as a very hot, not so annoying Krishna. :D But anyway, yeah, when I say I love my characters, I mean it.

Luke and Azrael = <3

My husband knows where he stands.

Shadow_Ferret
10-11-2007, 04:00 PM
Well... this is a creepy subject.

I do find my female MCs attractive, but that is usually because the characters are based on a amalgam of I've known throughout my life that I wouldn't have minded ... um ... getting to know better. nudge nudge wink wink say no more

Wraith
10-11-2007, 05:05 PM
Yes, it does happen now and then. But I'm careful not to limit the character to only that - give him the sexy lines and all :D They still get to be disgusting and weak and do unsexy things because I know the crazy mixture of their souls and that's just how people are, many different things at once. On the other hand, there's a certain unreedemable demon whom I keep trying to draw. ;)

Sorry if I'm not making sense. Must get coffee.

Doodlebug
10-11-2007, 05:06 PM
Well... this is a creepy subject.

Why?

Look at it this way, as a writer, don't you want your readers to identify with your characters? Don't you want your readers to care about what happens to the people in your book? Above all, characters must be real to your audience.

So if that's the case, why wouldn't you - as a writer - feel the same way? I believe that unless writers strongly identify with their characters in some way (feeling motherly/fatherly towards the children; identifing with the same sex main character; being afraid of the villian; falling in love with the - fill in the blank) the readers won't either. That psychic connection between writer and character is necessary because it breathes life into the story.

Yes, I suppose it can get creepy if those feelings spill over into everyday life. But that's the point of fiction - its fantasy. Many of us read it for the escape and many of us (myself included) write it for the same reason. It puts a gloss on the otherwise dull reality of things.

As for the real thing, well, it has the benefit of being real, doesn't it? I mean, you may be in love with your MC, but he's not about to make you chicken soup when you have a cold or be a dad to your kids or go to the movies with you. He's a just a figment.

seun
10-11-2007, 05:14 PM
I haven't fancied any of my characters although I did have a stirring down below when I read Starring Sally J. Friedman As Herself when I was 10.

C.bronco
10-11-2007, 05:15 PM
It's Pygmalion and Galatea, isn't it? http://www.metmuseum.org/works_of_art/viewonezoom.asp?dep=11&viewmode=1&mark=1&item=27.200 I had this print in my dorm room in college; the artist falls in love with his own work.

ccarver30
10-11-2007, 05:25 PM
Um, all my characters are totally hot and do anything I want them to...
So the answer is hell to the yes!!

Wraith
10-11-2007, 05:28 PM
So if that's the case, why wouldn't you - as a writer - feel the same way? I believe that unless writers strongly identify with their characters in some way (feeling motherly/fatherly towards the children; identifing with the same sex main character; being afraid of the villian; falling in love with the - fill in the blank) the readers won't either. That psychic connection between writer and character is necessary because it breathes life into the story.
I agree with you, but I have to add that being attracted to a character is unlikely to be enough for that connection. Imo, you have to be all your characters, as they come on stage, to breathe life into them, and that's a heck of a hard and scary thing. Of course that most applies when you write in their POV but imo they're all parts of you and putting yourself in their shoes is vital to their perceived complexity. Sorry if you meant this as well, I just fell like adding it :D; because the best villains I've read have made me feel not scared, but evil - as if I could find something of them in myself.

It's Pygmalion and Galatea, isn't it? http://www.metmuseum.org/works_of_ar...=1&item=27.200 I had this print in my dorm room in college; the artist falls in love with his own work.
Heh, nice! Although writers are more fortunate - they get to live part-time in that world. Or more unfortunate. ;)

Sassee
10-11-2007, 05:36 PM
I've managed to make a character attractive enough to be the favorite of myself and several betas. The only problem is, he's a secondary character. *sigh*

Of course, the opposite also applies. One of my "bad" guys irritates the hell out of me every time I write about him, and one beta asked "when is he going to die? I don't like him."

jodiodi
10-11-2007, 05:48 PM
So if that's the case, why wouldn't you - as a writer - feel the same way? I believe that unless writers strongly identify with their characters in some way (feeling motherly/fatherly towards the children; identifing with the same sex main character; being afraid of the villian; falling in love with the - fill in the blank) the readers won't either. That psychic connection between writer and character is necessary because it breathes life into the story.

I actually like my villains and identify more with the opposite sex characters than the same sex (heroines) ones. Is that odd?

Interested ... a little, I suppose. However, my heroes tend to have the characteristics of my husband (not so much looks, but manner) so when I have the real thing right there, well, why waste good lust on a character in a book?

Marian Perera
10-11-2007, 05:51 PM
Did I ever become sexually interested in a character? Happened with each book that worked (I could tell which book was a complete cowpat because I wasn't turned on by anyone). If I'm not attracted to and aroused by my heroes, I'd find it difficult to imagine the heroines feeling the same way.

Prawn
10-11-2007, 05:58 PM
Isn't that sort of fantasy life called masturbation?

Marian Perera
10-11-2007, 06:20 PM
Not that there's anything wrong with that.

WittyandorIronic
10-11-2007, 06:43 PM
Wow, you guys are scary...
Not because you feel as you do, but I swear I was just thinking about this, and then *poof*, jumped on AW and there the thread was! LoL.
I am attracted to my characters, and repulsed, and annoyed, and exasperated, and hopeful for them as well. They also make me laugh out loud sometimes, which is odd, as I am laughing at my own jokes...which are rarely funny.
I must admit...I write some damn -hawt- characters though, oooh boy! ;)

Jaycinth
10-11-2007, 07:07 PM
I have to admit, it has happened to me.

Annoyed my husband to no end. I would be “A*** this and A** * that” and my husband would say:

“What the Herl you talking ‘bout? Who’s this A*** a$$wipe anyway?”

And I’d tell him and then he’d go on a diatribe about how writing sucks.

So I tried to tell my MC I couldn’t write him anymore.

He didn’t take that well at all. Nope. Started giving me lectures on weapons, shovels and various organic compounds.


There was really only one way out of the situation.



I filed for divorce.


My MC is way hot.

Southern_girl29
10-11-2007, 07:08 PM
Not lately, because I've been writing YA and that would just be gross. But, with my first book, I did love my MC's best friend. I think anyone would. He was tall and strong with a good heart and soul, but he knew how to be bad and funny, too. Plus, he had lost a leg in Vietnam, so he had a tortured side to him, too.

Sassee
10-11-2007, 07:51 PM
I have to admit, it has happened to me.

Annoyed my husband to no end. I would be “A*** this and A** * that” and my husband would say:

“What the Herl you talking ‘bout? Who’s this A*** a$$wipe anyway?”

And I’d tell him and then he’d go on a diatribe about how writing sucks.

So I tried to tell my MC I couldn’t write him anymore.

He didn’t take that well at all. Nope. Started giving me lectures on weapons, shovels and various organic compounds.


There was really only one way out of the situation.



I filed for divorce.


My MC is way hot.

LOL!!!

joyce
10-11-2007, 07:57 PM
I find my male characters attractive because I make them be everything I would want to have in a perfect world. I'm in control so they are pawns in my game of life that I am creating.

preyer
10-11-2007, 07:59 PM
i suppose it's easy to do seeing as how a lot of writers over-indulge in wish-fulfillment. most heroes are sexy, well-built, and hung exactly as the writer would have them. heroines are sexy, well-built, and pull around as much or as little weight as the writer finds attractive in real life. basically, whatever idealized version of a person you *think* is perfect, how can you as a writer avoid not being 'attracted' to them? at least, attracted to the fantasy. at least we have the opportunity to mold them the way we want them to be and justify the difference between real life and fantasy, where boobs defy gravity and men can save the world and screw until sunrise, where virgins have the skillz of a pornstar and bad boys will change their ways for the right woman.

i'd guess there's a certain amount of us in most of our characters, sure, but there's also a certain amount of bullshit. people fall in love with the bullshit part of people in real life all the time. people fall in love with actors all the time because of the roles they play, no?

it's a bad thing to fall in love with a character? probably not unless you start comparing real life people with idealized fantasy characters. my wife has said i should read some of her romance books to get an idea of romance. okay, and while i'm at it i'll buy a ranch in montana and track down the mysterious killer stalking you between roping cows and breaking broncs or whatever the hell it is a 'cowboy' does. and i'll do this just because you, my dear, are a rich actress stranded in the bahamas.

i try to avoid idealized versions. since the characters are more real to me, in a way they're less appealing, or at least no more appealing, than someone i can readily find by stepping out my front door. idealized characters who still remain idealized even once being inside their head are about as realistic as those plastic dinosaurs i played with then i was four years old.

but, no, i'm no more sexually attracted to a character than i am to jenna jameson minus the performance and persona. writing about all the physical attributes you like, then adding the perfect persona you *think* you'd like in real life, is no challenge to your emotions ~ your emotions just can't win that battle. that said, it's not as if i'm inhuman and never get excited writing a sex scene. after all, they are based on fantasy. i just never confuse the fact.

Zelenka
10-11-2007, 08:01 PM
I reckon since nature has decided that I shall be completely unattractive to the opposite sex (or to any sex for that matter) then I'm within my rights to create characters I can lust over instead.

Although some of my MCs end up annoying me more than exciting me.

ink wench
10-11-2007, 08:30 PM
This has to be the funniest thread I've read in a long time. I can't say I've every become attracted to a character when I'm myself, but when I'm writing from a character's POV, then I feel their emotions. So yes and no, I guess.

Claudia Gray
10-11-2007, 08:38 PM
IMHO, all your characters should turn you on a little bit. The essence of attraction is intimacy, after all, and you know your characters more intimately than you know all but your very closest (and possibly even more than them). You should think they're attractive and appealing, at least the ones meant to be attractive and appealling (and probably a few of the ones who aren't).

Sexual obsession is something else entirely; if it gets to the point that you're more interested in your character (or an actress, or somebody on a Web site, or whatever) than in your real partner, yeah, it's time to take a step back.

WittyandorIronic
10-11-2007, 08:39 PM
I will make a small, slightly embarrassing admission, and I'm curious if anyone else feels the same. I wouldn't call it a sexual attraction...but it would definitely be an attraction. I, a very heterosexual girl, find that I am sometimes attracted to my female MCs. I think this is based in the fact that they are (for the most part) often extreme extensions of my own personality, with most the crappy portions strained out, and with a much better body. One MC is very vulnerable, and scared all the time...I am a loud raucous raising b*tch most the time...lol. No one has ever described me as "vulnerable", but I see that MC as that little tiny vulnerable spot i keep buried deep inside, brought to life and made gigantic. So not only do guys coddle her (which I am slightly envious of), but she gets to be brave in a different way than me, by showing that vulnerability. It's a trait I totally admire, so I am attracted to how strong she ends up being...and she has a really great rack. lol. I don't know...I guess the feeling kind of see-saws (tri-saws?) between envy, attraction, and admiration. Hmph. things to ponder...
ETA: Claudia TOTALLY nailed what I was trying to say in ONE word. Intimacy. I don't necessarily feel a sense of attraction, but a form of intimacy with my same sex characters.

clockwatcher
10-11-2007, 10:06 PM
I love and adore some of my characters but I've never been sexually attracted to any of them... I don't know how that would work, even.

ChaosTitan
10-11-2007, 10:15 PM
I have fallen in love with a handful of my heroes. Some of them just become more alive, more human, than others, and I find myself talking to my roommate about them like they were real people. I can't say, though, that I've ever become sexually interested in one of my characters--that's the heroine's job, after all. ;)

mscelina
10-11-2007, 10:18 PM
If you don't love a character that's MEANT to be loved, then something's definitely wrong. We write characters who are designed to inspire emotional responses in our readers. Falling for them ourselves is, I think, an indication that what we're doing is right.

MidnightMuse
10-11-2007, 10:22 PM
I do sometimes, sure. I write Male MC's because, being a heterosexual woman, I find men more interesting. The men I write all have faults, little irritating qualities that make them real people, but if you're talking about pure physical attraction, you betcha. I'd do each and every one of them.

Well, maybe not this one guy. But his friend, sure.

Doodlebug
10-12-2007, 12:09 AM
If you don't love a character that's MEANT to be loved, then something's definitely wrong. We write characters who are designed to inspire emotional responses in our readers. Falling for them ourselves is, I think, an indication that what we're doing is right.

That's what I meant in my last post (only you put it so much more succinctly and eloquently!)

And I wasn't thinking of attraction as physical so much as, well, spiritual. I really care about the people in my writing.

Anyone see "Stranger than Fiction"?

preyer
10-12-2007, 02:18 AM
'I find men more interesting' ~ that's funny, because us men are *so* uninteresting, lol.

what turns me off about some female writers writing men is they characters are made out to be hunky problem solvers who know exactly how to touch a woman at any given time.

what turns me off about some male writers writing female characters is those can be boobs on a stick minus the apparent chaotic nature of a woman. worse are those who write women as nothing but in absolute contradictions.

Ken Schneider
10-12-2007, 02:21 AM
Disclaimer: Of course, I could be lying.

I did once. I felt guilty for months.

How does one reconcile the lust of a story character that is part of our reality for a time?

Keep your hand outta' your pants for a start.

preyer
10-12-2007, 02:32 AM
were i single, i'd make high-end, full size 'love' dolls. if i could customize them, i think i'd make a mint off you guys, lol.

if i don't start reading some romance novels, i might be taking orders real soon, so start saving your nickels and dimes. just remember, suppliferous nipples are extra.

ken, are you suggesting we take our hands out of our pants and start putting them in yours?

MidnightMuse
10-12-2007, 02:45 AM
'I find men more interesting' ~ that's funny, because us men are *so* uninteresting, lol.

what turns me off about some female writers writing men is they characters are made out to be hunky problem solvers who know exactly how to touch a woman at any given time.

Not the guys I write ! Of course, I don't bother with sex scenes or love stories anyway.

But yeah, guys are interesting. Being the only woman where I work, with 32 guys, I find them interesting because they're different. And watching them trying to figure out women is a real hoot :D

Jack Nog
10-12-2007, 03:45 AM
Disclaimer: Of course, I could be lying.

I did once. I felt guilty for months.

How does one reconcile the lust of a story character that is part of our reality for a time? I find that sometimes I can become quite involved with my characters, but when is it that a line is drawn between these fictional individuals and our own individual realities.

Well, I...oh Wait..uh huh. No way. I'm not falling for that again...nope nothing ever happened. That's my story and I'm stickin' to it!

amber_grosjean
10-12-2007, 05:02 AM
I haven't fallen for any of my characters yet but I'm sure I will one of these days. It's a natural thing. If we have written our characters vividly, then they would appear to be real in our minds so I don't doubt that a lot of writers have.

With that being said, I do admit that I did get a little hot while some of those juicy scenes in my book recently published. Ok, a little more than hot. Let's just say my husband was really happy lol. We're all human so I think it would be normal. If we can be that interested as the creator of the story, just think how the readers would react?

Amber

leenakincaid
10-12-2007, 07:28 AM
Oh, all the time.

SpookyWriter
10-12-2007, 07:34 AM
Well, I...oh Wait..uh huh. No way. I'm not falling for that again...nope nothing ever happened. That's my story and I'm stickin' to it!Liar. :D Come clean. You'll feel much better.

Novelhistorian
10-12-2007, 07:52 AM
I don't write about wonderful physical specimens. My characters are neither beautiful nor ugly, but the most attractive of them have a certain something that makes people notice when they enter a room. I wouldn't say I'm physically attracted to them, but I'm definitely emotionally attached--sometimes too much so, and it hurts the writing. I need to let them get hurt more, not protect them so much.

J. R. Tomlin
10-12-2007, 07:57 AM
I do sometimes, sure. I write Male MC's because, being a heterosexual woman, I find men more interesting. The men I write all have faults, little irritating qualities that make them real people, but if you're talking about pure physical attraction, you betcha. I'd do each and every one of them.

Well, maybe not this one guy. But his friend, sure.
While being a heterosexual woman, I write FEMALE MCs because I think we women are fascinating and almost always under-rated. I tend to have some interesting male secondary characters though. But I don't write idealized characters whether they're male of female, so maybe that affects my reactions. All these perfect characters would be kind of boring, wouldn't they? Well, obviously not to everyone--but definitely to me.

leenakincaid
10-12-2007, 08:42 AM
Perfect characters are boring to me, too!

Doodlebug
10-12-2007, 05:20 PM
I don't write about wonderful physical specimens. My characters are neither beautiful nor ugly, but the most attractive of them have a certain something that makes people notice when they enter a room.

I think that should be a given for all characters. If they don't have that spark, why bother to write about them? I can't read a book in which I have to ask myself, "And the point of this is....?"

In another thread on AW, HConn talked about the eight deadly words test ("Do I really care about these people?" - or something along those lines - I can't remember exactly). I think that it is absolutely crucial to care about the characters (for both the writer and the reader).

preyer
10-12-2007, 06:14 PM
'If they don't have that spark, why bother to write about them?' ~ lacking that spark is the point of most of my characters, lol. it's the foot soldier in the trench for me, not the generals. the backstage, not the centre stage. the man walking down the street, not the corporate raider staring down with contempt from his corner office. different strokes, and all.

suffice to say i'll probably never write a bestseller. and i'm good with that. :)

Doodlebug
10-12-2007, 07:41 PM
'If they don't have that spark, why bother to write about them?' ~ lacking that spark is the point of most of my characters, lol. it's the foot soldier in the trench for me, not the generals. the backstage, not the centre stage. the man walking down the street, not the corporate raider staring down with contempt from his corner office. different strokes, and all.

suffice to say i'll probably never write a bestseller. and i'm good with that. :)

Okay, I get what you're saying. You are absolutely right, of course. Just because a person isn't a prince or queen or whatever doesn't mean that his/her story is not worth writing about. In fact, I think stories are more interesting when told from the POV of an average person.

I guess what I mean by 'spark' is that thing that draws your attention to them. Perhaps it has to do with personality of the character - IDK - maybe he is very introspective or very impulsive or very compulsive or something. When you write about someone, I believe that you are drawn to that character for some reason. Even if it is just a guy walking down the street, why is it that guy and not some other guy?

As for not writing a best seller...well, I think most of us can put ourselves into that category!! But, what the hey, if I was in this for the money, I'd have quit a l-o-n-g time ago. (But my good hopes go with you - may you write not just one but many best sellers :Sun:)

sneakers145
10-12-2007, 08:23 PM
Okay, I get what you're saying. You are absolutely right, of course. Just because a person isn't a prince or queen or whatever doesn't mean that his/her story is not worth writing about. In fact, I think stories are more interesting when told from the POV of an average person.

I put my average characters into extraordinary circumstances to see what they're made of. They're flawed and human, though most of my MCs tend to be good, honest, moral people.

My stories are along the lines of 'when bad things happen to good people' but not in a moral or poor me kind of way. Bad things that could happen to anyone, but are rare.

MMWyrm
10-12-2007, 09:05 PM
I totally have the hots for one of my MCs right now, which is odd, because I don't usually find red-haired guys attractive.

SpookyWriter
10-12-2007, 09:24 PM
I totally have the hots for one of my MCs right now, which is odd, because I don't usually find red-haired guys attractive.So we don't have a chance? And I'm almost real live man. The dead parts don't count.

icerose
10-12-2007, 09:30 PM
I feel through my characters what they're supposed to feel otherwise it's all too artificial and contrived. I've wept with my characters, laughed with them, felt that slight rise of attraction when they look your character's way. But I myself, no. it's all a fantasy and I strive very hard to keep away from ideal characters. They need character flaws. They need weaknesses, struggles.

BellaRush
10-12-2007, 09:34 PM
So we don't have a chance? And I'm almost real live man. The dead parts don't count.

Nope. No shot.:D

jenstrikesagain
10-12-2007, 10:34 PM
I got extremely fond of my bad guy, but it was not in a sexual sense. Probably because he himself wasn't all that sexual. I guess I didn't want to so much do him, as be him. Well, not really because he was Not A Nice Guy. But I envied him the complete freedom from moral, family & other constraints, and how he did whatever he wanted to do whenever he wanted to do it. Does that make sense? I didn't think so.

leenakincaid
10-13-2007, 09:10 AM
It did to me. Your character is either amoral or has antisocial personality disorder (sociopath). My MC does too, but he isn't sexy or admirable, just creepy.

Selcaby
10-16-2007, 03:17 AM
Yes, but we can never be together. Partly because he's not a fan of tall women, but mostly because he'd hate me if he ever found out that I'm the one who did those horrible things to him. :)

It's weird, because I deliberately designed him to be the opposite of the physical type that turned me on, and now I'm attracted to guys who look like him.

Azraelsbane
10-16-2007, 03:51 AM
The MC most of my betas fell in love with is a physical train wreck. Personality trumps all. I really hate perfect, hunky male chars. Just as I hate perfect, petite females with flowing hair and doey eyes. :D

WittyandorIronic
10-16-2007, 04:17 AM
I really hate perfect, hunky male chars. Just as I hate perfect, petite females with flowing hair and doey eyes. :D

I love hunky male and petite female (with flowing hair and doey eyes) MCs, and then I love screwing them all up.

The BC = A perfect hunky male, large, broad chested, who looks REALLY similar to the man that almost raped the female MC.
Unnamed WIP = petite female with flowing hair and doey eyes MC who is super smart and serious and can't get an ounce of respect even though she takes care of her stupid selfish family.

The second one isn't the main plot point, but it does weave into it a lot. I like giving pretty people crappy lives because they are so gorgeous...but, since I write romance, I then like giving them the chance to redeem themselves and have a happily ever after.

David I
10-16-2007, 11:14 AM
I'm sleeping with at least five of my characters.

Luckily, I had the foresight not to put "Reads Absolute Write forums" into their character traits. They don't know about each other, and they aren;t going to find out here.

Inky
10-16-2007, 12:08 PM
I killed off the character.
Cried & moped for days.
Even certain songs would send me off into dark somber moods.

I had to rewrite the manuscript. Couldn't go through with his death.
I've even a picture of him, framed. We're on such a first name basis that my husband claims him on tax returns.

http://www.toddlockwood.com/resources/images/galleries/dnd/02/plot_poison_det02.jpg (http://javascript<b></b>:window.close();)

copyright Todd Lockwood

Saundra Julian
10-16-2007, 05:28 PM
Naw, I only write about the ones I've already had and thrown away...

Cav Guy
10-16-2007, 05:53 PM
I've had a thing or two for some of my female MCs, but to an extent that's because they were created from what was at the time my own dream image of the ideal woman. Elements of that show up from time to time in characters now (both male and female), but those two are still special to me. Neither are perfect...not by any stretch of the imagination. But they have that special something that you can't really put into words (not in terms of a paragraph description, anyhow) but you just feel when you read about them.

Oddly enough (or perhaps not odd at all) they both appear in stories that contain the two male MCs that most reflect what I might like to be (again, not ideal images by far...one of them is a fairly nasty customer and both are antisocial in many ways). Coincidence? I think not...:)

But are the relationships better than those in real life? Yes and no. In some ways they do reflect an ideal, but there are also differences. Both character relationships have a bittersweet quality about them...something that hints they are not forever and that things will change drastically in the future (in one case I did kill the female MC off...a difficult writing moment for me). There's a sort of desperation in both that I don't feel in my RL relationship. Both are about lonely people coming together to find a level of happiness in lives that aren't exactly happy (again not like my RL stuff at all...but it was at one time).

SpookyWriter
10-17-2007, 08:01 AM
I've had a thing or two for some of my female MCs, but to an extent that's because they were created from what was at the time my own dream image of the ideal woman.I have one character in Dead Dreams that was not only a person in my book but a person who occupied my thoughts in a foreign land. There was a time when I was writing about her that I was dreaming or thinking of Natalie.

I must admit it was difficult to separate the two when I got lonely or depressed and was writing a scene. But as you can see, both were worth dreaming about. Unfortunately, I never did go to Ukraine and visit Natalie as much as I wanted. Just didn't work out. I guess the fantasy of a woman I couldn't have was too real.

http://i90.photobucket.com/albums/k272/SpookyWriter/Linda001.jpg

leenakincaid
10-17-2007, 11:19 AM
She's very pretty and I'm sorry things didn't work out with her.

preyer
10-17-2007, 05:57 PM
so, is that natalie or linda? yeah, she's pretty hot. but, trust me, you can find someone else within a four thousand mile radius, i'd think.

that's the bad thing about the internut, you 'talk' to someone, really start to like them, and your imagination starts filling in the details and elaborate fantasies take over. before you know it, you've frittered away a year of your life in fantasyland that you could have spent with someone within driving distance. and that's the danger of being a writer, imo, that we can spend more time in our fantasies than real life. almost worse is when you become sexually interested in a character who has a pleasing face and is a real person, once those lines are blurred you care about getting home to check your messages than you do going out with 'real' people.

i hate to say it, but when your fantasy life over-rules your real life, it's time to re-assess things and give them priorities.

SpookyWriter
10-17-2007, 09:25 PM
so, is that natalie or linda? yeah, she's pretty hot. but, trust me, you can find someone else within a four thousand mile radius, i'd think.

Does it matter?

that's the bad thing about the internut, you 'talk' to someone, really start to like them, and your imagination starts filling in the details and elaborate fantasies take over. before you know it, you've frittered away a year of your life in fantasyland that you could have spent with someone within driving distance. and that's the danger of being a writer, imo, that we can spend more time in our fantasies than real life. almost worse is when you become sexually interested in a character who has a pleasing face and is a real person, once those lines are blurred you care about getting home to check your messages than you do going out with 'real' people.

I don't do internet dating. I also don't date American women either. My previous three girlfriends were either Russian or Ukrainian who I met personally or were introduced by friends in Eastern Europe.

I probably spend less time on the internet that most people. If I am on an hour or two a day then I'd be surprised.

i hate to say it, but when your fantasy life over-rules your real life, it's time to re-assess things and give them priorities.

On my last trip to Ukraine I met a very beautiful woman. Unfortunately she was only twenty-five and I had just ended my previous relationship with Galina who turned twenty-seven this year.

http://i90.photobucket.com/albums/k272/SpookyWriter/Holiday047.jpg

My last trip to Kiev. Who is the guy in the middle?

Saanen
10-17-2007, 10:49 PM
I adore all my characters, but I can't say I want to jump in bed with any of them. Well, except for him...and also that other guy...and, well, okay, I guess I'm more attracted to some of my characters than I thought. I do admit, though, that I wouldn't mind being the minor character who has a brief affair with my MC. She's a lot of fun--but I wouldn't want to be her forever, even though I like her and she has a lot of positive traits.

Seems like it would be so hard to make a relationship work with a fictional character. Like, the ink would run at inappropriate times. :)

mirrorkisses
10-18-2007, 06:22 AM
All my male characters are based on men that have entered my life. Some are exes, some are men I've just fantasized about doing the dirty with. When I was younger (and wrote my first novel), I had the hardest time in the world making my male character a bad guy. I really cared about him (and wow was he hot).

I think that everyone has feelings for their characters. Why write about someone you don't care about. We put qualities we love into our main characters and of course you're going to have feelings for them, even if they are just a fantasy.

Right now my main male character is based on a musician that has always remained very mysterious to me. Something about him... Anyway, I'm able to do the nasty with him in my novel hehe.

Oh and... of course my female protagonists are always based somewhat on myself. They usually have a best friend, which I do make up out of thin air... Out of qualities I would want in any of my best friends (my real life bf moved to france).

mirrorkisses
10-18-2007, 06:40 AM
so, is that natalie or linda? yeah, she's pretty hot. but, trust me, you can find someone else within a four thousand mile radius, i'd think.

that's the bad thing about the internut, you 'talk' to someone, really start to like them, and your imagination starts filling in the details and elaborate fantasies take over. before you know it, you've frittered away a year of your life in fantasyland that you could have spent with someone within driving distance. and that's the danger of being a writer, imo, that we can spend more time in our fantasies than real life. almost worse is when you become sexually interested in a character who has a pleasing face and is a real person, once those lines are blurred you care about getting home to check your messages than you do going out with 'real' people.

i hate to say it, but when your fantasy life over-rules your real life, it's time to re-assess things and give them priorities.

I've had two internet relationships (with both we met fairly quickly after the internet thing). With one of them we kind of knew who the other was before anyway because we were hanging out in the same music scene, and people get to know each other more even just by reputation in that situation. Anyway, it's not something I'd do again, I was in a bad situation in my life at the time. I think the last one was more into the romantic idea of our situation.

Spiny Norman
10-18-2007, 07:30 AM
I like who my main character likes in the book that's out right now. But I wrote her to be sexually appealing and challenging and damaged, in her own way. I mean, I'm going to write appeal the way I find things appealing, so naturally you're going to want to get all jiggy with that person you're writing, right? I think if you're writing a character who's meant to be sexy and you're not attracted to them, well, that's a problem.

If you write one who's not sexy, and is just Some Guy or Gal, that's... Sort of weird. I honestly don't know how that could happen.

SpookyWriter
10-18-2007, 08:13 AM
I like who my main character likes in the book that's out right now. But I wrote her to be sexually appealing and challenging and damaged, in her own way. I mean, I'm going to write appeal the way I find things appealing, so naturally you're going to want to get all jiggy with that person you're writing, right? I think if you're writing a character who's meant to be sexy and you're not attracted to them, well, that's a problem.

If you write one who's not sexy, and is just Some Guy or Gal, that's... Sort of weird. I honestly don't know how that could happen.And there lies the problem sometimes. We writers begin to associate some of our sexual desires toward the characters in our works. But is this a bad thing? How else would our readers feel about a flat (cardboard) character who we intended to have some appeal?