PDA

View Full Version : Is Money a key to Happiness?



4indianwoman
10-01-2007, 06:50 PM
Don't tax your health over making more money, as it's not bound to give you the desired happiness your heart is yearning for.
If a man working so hard (e.g 16 or 18 hrs out of 24 hrs) then he has no time left for personal relationships and leisure.
People don't experience wealth unless they compare it with others, and once they satisfy one set of their aspirations, the other emerges.
THE respectable Members of the Forum !
Do you also feel same ? Share your thoughts....

Susie
10-01-2007, 07:04 PM
That's a great question, 4indianwoman, I think money isn't necessarily the key to happiness, though it is the key to having a more secure feeling. When you don't have money issues to worry about, you can concentrate more on things that are meaningful and what you want to do, not what you have to do.

PS There's also a saying, "If money doesn't buy happiness, you don't know where to shop!" :D

C.bronco
10-01-2007, 07:07 PM
Oh No! I misread the thread title as "Is a Monkey a key to happiness?" In which case I'd wonder. I've never had a monkey. Would my life be better if I were to include monkeys in my daily routine? Should I invest in monkeys, or, at least monkey business?

Now I'll be in a quandry all day.

Sunkissed27f
10-01-2007, 07:20 PM
Here's a tidbit. When you think of your future, at any age, think of having a job as thus:
J-O-B= Just over broke!

A job is something you don't like, you work TOO hard at (and get no where).
Shoot for the career.
At any age, at any class level (I.e. rich, poor, middle class) there are means to have a career.

Money can buy happiness. Even though that happiness is short lived, it IS still happiness.
In the long run, money can fulfill your WANT for happiness, think Psychological Happiness and objects.

It can't fulfill your NEED for happiness, think Emotional Happiness. That only comes from emotional events like family, love, etc.

So to say money CAN'T buy your happiness is not entirely a true statement.
For example: The trip to Disney Land you bought DID make you happy, but the event emotionally made you happier.

johnnysannie
10-01-2007, 07:26 PM
Money is not the key to happiness - happiness lies within and can not be bought - but having money certainly makes life much easier.

jennifer75
10-01-2007, 07:37 PM
Money is the key to happiness, the question is - which door to open?

Claudia Gray
10-01-2007, 07:50 PM
In the immortal words of Weird Al Yankovic, "Money can't buy happiness, but it sure does help to rent it."

Mysti
10-01-2007, 08:14 PM
I don't believe that money is the key to happiness, however, having stability in a monetary world does provide more outlets available to have happy experiences.

For a family barely scraping by, possibly needing state assistance, there aren't many free events for their family to enjoy and the option to purchase certain products for entertainment is limited. However, if you have a middle class family that is able to save a couple hundred dollars a month while allotting for entertainment expenses can have a much more pleasant experience. They can take the opportunity to see a concert, go to a festival, plan vacations, etc.

So while no, I don't believe that chasing the all-mighty dollar is a key to happiness, having financial security certainly can have its benefits.

jenngreenleaf
10-01-2007, 08:20 PM
Money is the key to happiness, the question is - which door to open?

I agree! ;)

awatkins
10-01-2007, 08:24 PM
Umm...this doesn't really belong in this forum. Hang onto your keyboards whilst I transport you all to Office Party.

benbradley
10-01-2007, 08:26 PM
Don't tax your health over making more money, as it's not bound to give you the desired happiness your heart is yearning for.
If a man working so hard (e.g 16 or 18 hrs out of 24 hrs) then he has no time left for personal relationships and leisure.
It depends on what you're doing. Working for an employer that much is less likely to be satisfying, but if you're running your own business or working independently in a profession of your choosing (such as, say, writing), you may well be doing exactly what your heart is yearning for.

Here's a tidbit. When you think of your future, at any age, think of having a job as thus:
J-O-B= Just over broke!
Where did that come from? It sounds like something they say in Amway or some other MLM cult.

A job is something you don't like, you work TOO hard at (and get no where).
That's redefining the word in a negative context, when often it doesn't mean that at all.

Money is the key to happiness, the question is - which door to open?
"My whole world lies waiting behind Door Number Three." (from an early minor hit song by then-regional singer-songwriter Jimmy Buffett - I recall he played it in a 30-second spot on an Atlanta TV station promoting the show "Let's Make A Deal.")

benbradley
10-01-2007, 08:28 PM
Umm...this doesn't really belong in this forum. Hang onto your keyboards whilst I transport you all to Office Party.
Did my post make it? Looks like it did, and I even wrote something relevant...

MidnightMuse
10-01-2007, 08:52 PM
Money might not be the key to happiness, but I'm betting it's at least the doorbell.

C.bronco
10-01-2007, 08:55 PM
But monkeys make everyone happy.

Azraelsbane
10-01-2007, 08:56 PM
Happiness is hidden behind a door with a truckload of locks. Money is a key, not the key. :)

RumpleTumbler
10-01-2007, 08:57 PM
No but being poor isn't the key to happiness either. I can attest to that.

JoNightshade
10-01-2007, 09:07 PM
I'm in the "money makes life easier" camp.

I think money has nothing to do with happiness, or if it does it's a very small part of it. Family, friends, loved ones, a sense of contentment and self worth... all those go a long way towards happiness.

totidem_verbis
10-01-2007, 09:15 PM
IMHO, money gives you options.

Happiness is a choice. You can choose to be happy despite circumstances. If you're not happy, seek happiness.

Shadow_Ferret
10-01-2007, 10:02 PM
Everyone says money can't buy happiness. I don't know about that, but it sure can buy financial security which goes a long way to happiness.

To paraphrase Lou Reed, money may not buy happiness, but it'll buy a Rolls-Royce so you can drive around and look for happiness.

JoNightshade
10-01-2007, 10:06 PM
PS I would like to chime in with others who say that yes, monkeys are happiness.

chartreuse
10-01-2007, 10:15 PM
I don't believe that money can buy happiness, but money can buy time.

If I won the lottery, that's the only thing I'm absolutely sure I'd purchase. Bye-bye day job! (And yes, that WOULD make me happy!)

benbradley
10-02-2007, 01:10 AM
Everyone says money can't buy happiness. I don't know about that, but it sure can buy financial security which goes a long way to happiness.

To paraphrase Lou Reed, money may not buy happiness, but it'll buy a Rolls-Royce so you can drive around and look for happiness.


I don't believe that money can buy happiness, but money can buy time.

If I won the lottery, that's the only thing I'm absolutely sure I'd purchase. Bye-bye day job! (And yes, that WOULD make me happy!)

Winning the lottery appears to be an evil thing for many people. I recall a horrifying statistic that the majority of winners file bankruptcy within ten years.

Here's a winner who knew how to handle the money, but still, what it did to him socially isn't pretty:
http://edition.cnn.com/2007/LIVING/wayoflife/09/13/lottery.nightmare.ap/index.html

There's a new(ish) book out about lotteries and "the gaming industry" written by an industry insider who has known many lottery winners, and he tells what happened to their lives. I forget the title, but I was reading through it at Barnes & Noble the other day.

RumpleTumbler
10-02-2007, 01:14 AM
There is a show out that tells all these horror stories as well. I watched it about a month ago but like everything else Comcast continues to air it over and over in the hope that you'll buy On Demand. Anyway....I'd like to have the chance to screw up winning the lottery. It would be nice to not be one paycheck away from the street for a while.

I've been saving to have a tooth pulled for almost a year. I think I could get used to just being able to go get it done if I needed to. When I get through with that I get to save for another year or two to get my teeth cleaned.

It would be nice to be able to just go to the dentist or buy something to wear or take my child on vacation.

sassandgroove
10-02-2007, 01:29 AM
Everyone says money can't buy happiness. I don't know about that, but it sure can buy financial security which goes a long way to happiness.


I agree with this.

I also wish Alabama had a lottery, even if all I ever get is the chance to daydream about winning.

JLCwrites
10-02-2007, 01:29 AM
Here's a tidbit. When you think of your future, at any age, think of having a job as thus:
J-O-B= Just over broke!

A job is something you don't like, you work TOO hard at (and get no where).
Shoot for the career.

I agree and wanted to add one more...
Job,
Career,
Calling... a calling is what you have always dreamed of doing, and you are really good at it.

Beyond retirement and medical coverage, if you take a look at how much spendable income there is at the end of each month, most people would be in the same ballpark. Those with lots of money buy more expensive things, have higher monthly payments, and pay for a lot of extras. (I have friends who are perfect examples!)

When it comes to material wealth...for me, less is more. I feel too cluttered if I have a lot of clothes, nicknack's and other such things!

But true happiness is found in life experiences. Yesterday, hubby, kids and I went running through a beautiful park next to a river. It was drizzling and we didn't care. It was so much fun to watch our little ones giggling and trying to catch the rain on their tongues! (And that was free!)

KTC
10-02-2007, 01:33 AM
I don't like money. Frankly, I have very little time for monkeys...unless, of course, they can tend bar. Then...I suppose...

Sunkissed27f
10-02-2007, 01:51 AM
Calling... a calling is what you have always dreamed of doing, and you are really good at it.

A career to me is the same thing as a calling.

sassandgroove
10-02-2007, 01:57 AM
Winning the lottery appears to be an evil thing for many people. I recall a horrifying statistic that the majority of winners file bankruptcy within ten years.

Here's a winner who knew how to handle the money, but still, what it did to him socially isn't pretty:
http://edition.cnn.com/2007/LIVING/wayoflife/09/13/lottery.nightmare.ap/index.html

There's a new(ish) book out about lotteries and "the gaming industry" written by an industry insider who has known many lottery winners, and he tells what happened to their lives. I forget the title, but I was reading through it at Barnes & Noble the other day.
I can't get the link to load. It stops half way. :( I'll try again later.

sassandgroove
10-02-2007, 01:59 AM
A career to me is the same thing as a calling.
I'd say they are different. Though they can certainly coincide, they don't always do. I wouldn't call where I work now either my JOB as stated up thread or my calling. I have had a career as an affice administrator for 10 years, I am good at it and proud of it, but it isn't my calling.

III
10-02-2007, 02:07 AM
Having money means there's just one less thing to worry about. I think Ross Perot was the one who said "The more stuff you have, the more stuff breaks." Money comes and money goes. When ya got it, spread it around.

Tiger
10-02-2007, 02:39 AM
I'd rather be standing on land, wondering where I'm going than treading water, bereft of even that choice.

In case you're wondering: I'm a land creature.

Carole
10-02-2007, 02:55 AM
They say that money isn't everything...I'd like to see you live without it...

*heard that in a song once*

KTC
10-02-2007, 02:59 AM
Having money means there's just one less thing to worry about. I think Ross Perot was the one who said "The more stuff you have, the more stuff breaks." Money comes and money goes. When ya got it, spread it around.

Your head's a shiny, shiny diamond.

NeuroFizz
10-02-2007, 04:42 AM
Money is a key that can open a lot of doors, but that doesn't automatically equate to happiness. And money can make a person happy, but that doesn't automatically equate to happiness either. Even if a person spends a lot of money to change the image of the person in the mirror, it doesn't mean that mirror person reflects true happiness--that spent money won't erase the unhappiness that drove the person to the scalpel in the first place, although it might make that person a little happier. I guess I'm just agreeing with others in saying there is a huge difference between inner happiness, which is long-term, and being happy, which is usually momentary in comparison.

III
10-02-2007, 04:46 AM
They say that money isn't everything...I'd like to see you live without it...

*heard that in a song once*

Ah, that was Silverchair's "Tomorrow". What ever happened to them?

You're gonna wait too, fat boy, fat boy, wait till tomorrow.

wood pixie
10-02-2007, 09:04 AM
I've been very poor.
As in really not knowing where my next meal would come from type poor.
Money can buy material security, which can reduce a person's mental stress significantly.
I've had. I've had not. I prefer having.

However money is not the cause of happiness, nor is a want for money the cause of unhappiness.

There are very rich people who are miserably unhappy.

There are poor people who are quite happy.

Each of us, back when we were very young and innocent had a dream, we had a desire, we were in touch with what life, this earth, the future could offer us. We all were meant to fulfill that basic essential purpose we were born to do.

I think that is what causes most people's unhappiness in life. Being unfulfilled inside. That's what causes the infamous midlife crisis and need to "find myself". People reach a point in their life when the realize they are not living the life they were meant to live.

You can't find happiness in other people. You must discover who you are and what you are meant to be and become or find that person and learn to embrace him/her and love who you are.

It took me some time to learn this. I don't have a whole lot of money. I have more than I used to. But what makes me happy is that I am doing what I LOVE.

I LOVE my "job". I am paid to do something I love !!! I get paid to wander around the country. Paid gypsy ... that's me.

And I am writing.

I wouldn't trade my life with anyone. I am happy with who I am and where I am at ..... even if it is so close to Washington DC at the moment .... hmmmmmm

Joe270
10-02-2007, 09:18 AM
Ask Britney Spears, OJ Simson, Phil Spector, Michael Vick, or Lindsy Lohan.

That's a really happy bunch.

PeeDee
10-02-2007, 08:40 PM
Is an infinite number of moneys banging on typewriters going to write Shakespeare for me? No. So I'll take the Monkeys.

PeeDee
10-02-2007, 08:42 PM
Anyway, which of these makes you happier?

http://www.fourthcornerexchange.com/images/dollar%20bill.jpg

http://www.freshglue.com/fresh_glue/images/monkey.jpg

benbradley
10-02-2007, 08:46 PM
Anyway, which of these makes you happier?

http://www.fourthcornerexchange.com/images/dollar%20bill.jpg

http://www.freshglue.com/fresh_glue/images/monkey.jpg

With the dollar (and a few nickels) I can buy a cup of coffee, and that will make me happier than a monkey listening to an ipod.

PeeDee
10-02-2007, 08:48 PM
Monkey knows that's not an iPod, silly boy! I wouldn't give you a dollar now.

jannawrites
10-03-2007, 01:13 AM
But monkeys make everyone happy.

If they're worker monkeys, at your beck and call, then yes!

sassandgroove
10-03-2007, 01:26 AM
Anyway, which of these makes you happier?


I'd rather have the dollar.


ETA: I managed to read that link from Ben Bradley about the lottery winner who was unhappy.
I think that guy would be unhappy anyway. The article says he drank and that he used to go to church regularly before he won, but stopped, and that things happened after he won like a breifcase of cash was stolen while he was at a strip club. He said that he would give back all the money if he could have his granddaughter back, (she died of drug overdose.) But he also said he had his own money before he won. So his granddaughter might have gotten into drugs anyway. All these things point to an unhappy man, regardless. He said what changed wasn't so much having money, but that now everyone knew he had money and hit him up for some. Now I can't know what that is like, but if he didn't need it anyway, maybe he would have been happier staying in church, staying married, not drinking and giving it away? I am not one to judge, I am sorry for his losses, and I imagine it would be hard to evaluate who really needs money and who is just mooching, and it would be increasingly hard to trust anyone trying to befriend you, but he had friends before, yet didn't manage to hold on to them, including his wife. I am not sure what I am trying to say here, except that he sounded unhappy to start with and money didn't help.

When I imagine winning the lottery, the first thing that comes to my mind after paying off our house (possibly buying/building a bigger one) is buying a house for my parents and my husband's parents, and even offering to pay off our best friend's mortgage, ( barring that, at least bringing them along on a nice vacation with us. Money can be funny between freinds.) I wouldn't want them to think I thought less of them by offering, either, so I would broach it carefully. I would also give quite a bit to charity. To me the gift wouldn't be money, so much, as time. I would invest it so it would last throughout my life and allow me to persue ventures such as writing full time, and owning a cafe. So I would still work, just not here. When I taught preschool I remember imagining that I would still teach, I just wouldn't let them pay me, or I would give all my income back to my church. Now what I would actually do if I won I can't possibly know. SOme of the jackpots are unfathomable amounts of money. But I would hope I would stick pretty close to my plan above. Of course I would do things like travel in there as well, and buy some new toys.

Foinah
10-03-2007, 02:53 AM
Oh No! I misread the thread title as "Is a Monkey a key to happiness?" In which case I'd wonder. I've never had a monkey. Would my life be better if I were to include monkeys in my daily routine? Should I invest in monkeys, or, at least monkey business?

Now I'll be in a quandry all day.

In my book it is ;)

http://i189.photobucket.com/albums/z12/foinah/joecool.jpg

jennifer75
10-03-2007, 02:59 AM
I've been mis-reading thread titles all day, all week. You don't want to know how I read the "catch your wife cheating online" thread....lol. Oh yes, and it's only Tuesday.

Unique
10-03-2007, 05:24 AM
I've been mis-reading thread titles all day, all week. You don't want to know how I read the "catch your wife cheating online" thread....lol. Oh yes, and it's only Tuesday.


Yeah, I do. Eye bloopers are funny.

sassandgroove
10-04-2007, 11:29 PM
Guess money can't buy responses to brilliant posts, either.

Ken
01-13-2015, 03:24 AM
... money can buy one a lot of nice things. Shameful perspective to be sure.

Maze Runner
01-13-2015, 03:36 AM
Old thread, but always relevant.

Money won't buy you happiness, but having no money will surely buy you a whole lot of misery.

Or, in the immortal words of the late, great Joe E. Lewis: "I've been rich and I've been poor. Rich is better."

benbradley
01-13-2015, 04:57 AM
It's a years-old Necro-Thread, brought back to life!

FWIW, here's a good link for the won-the-lottery story I mention in post #22:
https://web.archive.org/web/20070813051512/http://edition.cnn.com/2007/LIVING/wayoflife/09/13/lottery.nightmare.ap/index.html

sassandgroove
01-13-2015, 11:34 PM
I'd still like to win. Still no lottery in Alabama. I enter contests like the HGTV Dream Home, planning, of course, to take the cash option (1.7 million). I don't think it will buy me happiness, but not fretting over every single dollar, which is all spent before I get paid btw, would help a lot.

KTC
01-13-2015, 11:45 PM
Death Thread Striketh

Chasing the Horizon
01-14-2015, 12:22 AM
I know this is a zombie thread, but I find it an interesting question. I've been both well-off and poor and have never found that it made much difference in my happiness. See, when I had money, I was working a soul-sucking job in order to have it. Being poor has its stresses, but they're much less constant than that job was. Maybe I would be happier if I had a job I loved that was paying well (say, being a best-selling author ;) ). Having never been in that position, I can't say for sure.

I remember reading an article in something like Time Magazine years ago where they surveyed people's reported happiness and incomes, and they did find that happiness increased with higher incomes, but only to a point. Once people reached an upper middle class income, the happiness leveled off and even dropped some for 'rich' people. My guess would be that many of the people with high incomes also had demanding, high-stress jobs and thus were less happy.

Fruitbat
01-14-2015, 12:27 AM
It's a resurrection!

Of course money is a key to happiness. If you have more money, you have more security, insulation from many problems, freedom to have and do whatever you want. How could that not be a key to happiness?

P.S. Anyone who doesn't think so, send me your money, I'll take it off your hands. :p

KTC
01-14-2015, 12:29 AM
I want to live without walls.

Chasing the Horizon
01-14-2015, 12:31 AM
Well, I guess if money just fell out of the sky more would always be better (though I don't have the slightest idea what I would do with an income of six figures--my tastes just aren't that expensive). In the real world it doesn't work that way, though.

sassandgroove
01-14-2015, 12:40 AM
I don't know what problems having money would bring but I'd sure like to find out.

quickWit
01-14-2015, 12:40 AM
I like monkeys, and all, but the key to happiness?

please.

sassandgroove
01-14-2015, 12:41 AM
I joke with God that I know why I don't win the lottery (or contests), it's because I pray for my daily bread, not for all of my bread at once. Ha.

heza
01-14-2015, 12:45 AM
I enter contests like the HGTV Dream Home, planning, of course, to take the cash option (1.7 million). I don't think it will buy me happiness, but not fretting over every single dollar, which is all spent before I get paid btw, would help a lot.

See, I specifically did not enter the HGTV contest this year because I really love that house (like, really, really) and would totally move up there, but I know I couldn't afford the prize or property taxes, and it would kill me to take the cash option and know they were selling that house off to someone much better off than I am. :(

I'm a little greedier than most, I guess. I'll admit to not liking work... well, I don't like working for someone else. I'd love to own my own business or turn writing into a career. I think that would give me more job satisfaction. I totally agree that having enough money that I didn't have to worry about bills would significantly improve my stress level. But I'd like enough money to buy nice things... not extravagant things, just nice. Like, we need a new car (ours is breaking down), and I'd like to buy a good car with a few bells and whistles... but I'd still have trouble rationalizing paying more than $40K for a vehicle (which we're nowhere close to affording, now).

But my husband and I talk about winning the lottery a lot (even though we don't play, lol; it's just a game we have). And one thing we've agreed on is that we want just enough money that we could quit working (or work for ourselves) and still live nicely but conservatively. We think happiness would be not having to do the daily grind but rather put that energy into pursuits that enrich our lives on a different level (even if those pursuits still make money), but we don't want to make a bunch of money just to buy a bunch of things that require us to make more money.

We see these really, really huge houses in town all squished up against each other, and my husband always talks about how if he had money for a house like that, he'd build it away from everyone else where he can get some peace and quiet. But then we realize all these people have to be close to the big $$$ jobs they're anchored to. And that seems like a pretty depressing life in some ways.


FWIW, here's a good link for the won-the-lottery story I mention in post #22:

I always assumed that people who imploded after getting a hold of money that way were halfway off the rails to begin with, and it sounds like that family had their issues (but who doesn't, right?), but I hadn't considered things like people vandalizing your car and house, making up things about you in the news, or threatening to kidnap members of your family. That must be really rough.

Lavern08
01-14-2015, 12:49 AM
That HGTV House is MINE, all mine, I tell ya!!!! :tongue

Ken
01-14-2015, 12:59 AM
In general, maybe, a person's innate temperament is the most significant determinant. Upbeat peeps are most always going to be so. Same of downbeats.

That said, issues arising from lack of loot can definitely be downers. Plus, what you can do if you have loot. E.g. take a two week vacation on some tropical island. Call me superficial but that would make me :-)

jjdebenedictis
01-14-2015, 02:24 AM
I remember reading an article in something like Time Magazine years ago where they surveyed people's reported happiness and incomes, and they did find that happiness increased with higher incomes, but only to a point. Once people reached an upper middle class income, the happiness leveled off and even dropped some for 'rich' people. My guess would be that many of the people with high incomes also had demanding, high-stress jobs and thus were less happy.Yeah, they estimate about $70 - 80,000 a year (http://lifehacker.com/5632191/75000-is-the-perfect-salary-for-happiness) is the level where you're maximally-happy thanks to money.

What I found interesting is a study where they found a slightly increased suicide rate (which would presumably correlate with happiness) among people in the same income range if they lived in a neighbourhood where most households were wealthier than theirs.

That is to say, people making $80,000 a year in an $80,000-a-year neighbourhood are happier than people making $80,000 a year in a $120,000-a-year neighbourhood. Keeping up with the Jones' will make you miserable.

Personally, I'd be happy continuing to work (I love my job!) and also happy if I could quit (I love goofing off!) Also, I always say I'd like enough money to not have to worry about money anymore, but encoded in that desire is the assumption I would continue to live as comfortably as I do now. Lifestyle creep is real, y'all.

Haggis
01-14-2015, 04:37 AM
It's a years-old Necro-Thread, brought back to life!

FWIW, here's a good link for the won-the-lottery story I mention in post #22:
https://web.archive.org/web/20070813051512/http://edition.cnn.com/2007/LIVING/wayoflife/09/13/lottery.nightmare.ap/index.html
It's dead, Jim.

Haggis
01-14-2015, 06:00 AM
Okay, folks. I'll relent this time. But don't blame me if this zombie thread sucks out your brains in the middle of the night.

C.bronco
01-14-2015, 06:27 AM
Don't tax your health over making more money, as it's not bound to give you the desired happiness your heart is yearning for.
If a man working so hard (e.g 16 or 18 hrs out of 24 hrs) then he has no time left for personal relationships and leisure.
People don't experience wealth unless they compare it with others, and once they satisfy one set of their aspirations, the other emerges.
THE respectable Members of the Forum !
Do you also feel same ? Share your thoughts....

I heard about a study that said those who make 75k a year are happiest. More or less causes stress.

C.bronco
01-14-2015, 06:31 AM
I like monkeys, and all, but the key to happiness?

please.

This is a truth that few are privy to: monkeys are the true source of happiness, except when chimpanzees throw poop at you. This is something we hold to be self evident. Thank you Quickwit for alerting us to this important and sage wisdom. We get so caught up in our everyday ideas about monkeys that we don't stop to examine the reality.

Channy
01-15-2015, 07:06 AM
What is this HGTV House thing you people speak of?

sassandgroove
01-15-2015, 07:04 PM
Channy,

http://www.hgtv.com/design/hgtv-dream-home

HGTV has several contests a year, the HGTV Dream Home is the biggie, the contest is going on right now. You can enter twice a day for about a month at their website (above). The prize of the house and SUV is valued at 2 million, but the cash option (no hassle trying to sell the house) is 1.7 million and includes the SUV. I'll take the cash option, thanks. I try to remember to enter every day. Through out the year they also have give aways for an Urban Oasis, a Smart Home and a Green Home. Again, cash options thanks! I enter contests at HGTV, DIY, Food Network, Travel Channel and GAC. Right now Travel Channel is giving away a trip to Hawaii, which would be nice, and is valued at $100,000, but ...wait for it... the cash option is $75,000. Even though I'd love to go to Hawaii, for $75,000 we could pay off all our debt except the house and then we could afford our own trips. The Travel Channel trip includes a lot of tours and things. We could go to Hawaii for less than the trip value. I like to read the rules and look for the cash options, because sometimes I don't really want the prize. Travel channel is also giving away a trip to Dominican Republic. I'd go but Hubby is not interested. No cash option, so I'm not entering that one.

Also Better HOmes and Gardens website has a lot of sweepstakes. You have to create a login at their site, but $25,000! THere they link to sister magazines with more sweepstakes. I have an email just for HGTV and these and other junk. Anyway, they give $10,000, $15,000 and $25,000 prizes, and there are several. You have to "prove you are a human" and watch a video, but hey...$25,000.

I used to enter the Publisher's Clearing House but it (at least it used to) messed up my computer with ad ware and spy ware. It's a shame because the prize they are giving away right now is $5,000 a week for the rest of your life. That's $260,000 a year. I could quit working and write and craft.

robjvargas
01-15-2015, 08:03 PM
Don't forget (in the USA) that both multi-state lotteries are over $150 million for the main prize. Powerball is one-hundred-seventy-something million and MegaMillions is two-hundred-seventy-someodd million. I put $2 down on which ever one is larger when they go over $150 million.

$2 a week to dream a little bit... I'll pay that when I can afford it. Even if I am more likely to get struck by a meteor... twice. :D

Oh, and money may not be the key to happiness, but I don't mind figuring that out for myself.

sassandgroove
01-15-2015, 08:23 PM
I would probably enter all of those as well if we did but we don't have a lottery in Alabama. :(

Ken
01-16-2015, 01:17 AM
I would probably enter all of those as well if we did but we don't have a lottery in Alabama. :(

Yer lucky in a way. A lot of people spend a ton of money a year on lottery tickets and never win. Or if they do, only a $100 or so. Probably if they just saved all that money they'd have a nice sum, all told ;-)

Robjvargas, not so. Will win !

jjdebenedictis
01-16-2015, 01:45 AM
Those multiple-hundreds-of-millions lotteries always make my brain balk a little. I can imagine what I'd do with one million, five million, ten million, even fifty million dollars. But two hundred million?

Like, there isn't that much chocolate in the whole world.

Ken
01-16-2015, 03:41 AM
Those multiple-hundreds-of-millions lotteries always make my brain balk a little. I can imagine what I'd do with one million, five million, ten million, even fifty million dollars. But two hundred million?

Like, there isn't that much chocolate in the whole world.

Not so much of an issue if you reside in the USA due to taxes. Uncle Sam will take half of your winnings, for starts.

But yeah. That's still a lot of money !

docphotog
01-16-2015, 03:54 AM
OP In our world you need $ to live, but $ is not everything.

For happiness we need:

Something to do.
Something to look forward to.
Someone to love.
Someone to love us.

If $was the end all, only the rich would be happy. If that was the case, what would the cutoff be for a net worth that produced happiness?

Brutal Mustang
01-16-2015, 04:37 AM
OP In our world you need $ to live, but $ is not everything.

For happiness we need:

Something to do.
Something to look forward to.
Someone to love.
Someone to love us.



Oh yeah?



Try finding entertainment in a dark cold house with no electricity. (Been there.)
The only thing to look forward to when you're dead broke and hungry is a nap. (Been there.)
Try finding someone to love and love you when you have no money - it takes money to find, and especially to sustain, human relationships of any kind. When a person becomes suddenly poor, friendships are the first thing to suffer. (Been there.)

Money is the air we breath in this modern age, and anyone who thinks otherwise has had a sheltered life.

KellyAssauer
01-16-2015, 05:43 AM
This is a truth that few are privy to: monkeys are the true source of happiness, except when chimpanzees throw poop at you. This is something we hold to be self evident.

Baboons though.

They'll rip your face off.

Channy
01-16-2015, 05:49 AM
Channy,

http://www.hgtv.com/design/hgtv-dream-home

HGTV has several contests a year, the HGTV Dream Home is the biggie, the contest is going on right now. You can enter twice a day for about a month at their website (above). The prize of the house and SUV is valued at 2 million, but the cash option (no hassle trying to sell the house) is 1.7 million and includes the SUV. I'll take the cash option, thanks. I try to remember to enter every day. Through out the year they also have give aways for an Urban Oasis, a Smart Home and a Green Home. Again, cash options thanks! I enter contests at HGTV, DIY, Food Network, Travel Channel and GAC. Right now Travel Channel is giving away a trip to Hawaii, which would be nice, and is valued at $100,000, but ...wait for it... the cash option is $75,000. Even though I'd love to go to Hawaii, for $75,000 we could pay off all our debt except the house and then we could afford our own trips.

Gees, what kind of tours and things can be done in Hawaii for that kind of money? My parents went for 2 weeks and had a jolly ol time spending barely over 3 grand on the whole trip.

But wow, that is some house. Cash options are usually the best bet, I agree. Even if it's a little less, you can choose the priorities for which you need it, as well as still have some left for some fun.

sassandgroove
01-16-2015, 06:03 AM
I know I thought the same thing about the trip.


. Been there.)
Try finding someone to love and love you when you have no money - it takes money to find, and especially to sustain, human relationships of any kind. When a person becomes suddenly poor, friendships are the first thing to suffer. (Been there.) sounds like you need new friends.

Brutal Mustang
01-16-2015, 10:06 AM
sounds like you need new friends.

sassandgroove, it was by no fault of my friends. They'd call and say, "Lets meet up, and do coffee!" And I'd be like, "Nope, gotta paint." Because the electric was about to shut off. And all my clothes had holes, and I didn't want my friends to see how low I'd fallen. And I couldn't afford a damn cup of coffee anyway, much less the fuel I'd burn driving to the coffee shop. After a few months, they gave up calling.

And dating? Forget that when you're poor.

You see, money is power.

It's the power to help the people you want to help.

It's the power to go to the places you want to go.

It's the power to do the things you want to do.

It's the power to hang out with, meet, and befriend people.

It's the power to be as healthy as possible.

It's the power to eat and wear clothes.

It's the power to have some time away from work.

So in a way, yes, money leads to happiness. In fact, people can be unhappy with money, but they can't be happy without it (Unless they are sickly happy about being hungry, naked, and homeless). This wasn't true in hunter-gatherer societies. And the same still holds true in some third world societies, where money isn't needed to survive.

The trouble is, people in more advanced societies look at these people in poor places, and say, "Look how happy they are, despite being poor." But the fact is, many of these people are hunting, gathering, fishing, sewing, et cetera. They don't need money to be happy. Meanwhile, people in modern societies do. But they tend to be romantically held to the same standards as the primitive self-sufficient villages, and shamed for loving money.

regdog
01-16-2015, 04:26 PM
Every time I see this thread title I see "Is Monkey the Key to Happiness."

Fruitbat
01-16-2015, 05:16 PM
@Brutal Mustang- I agree that money makes a difference. I have noticed this when I've had a big financial fall or rise compared to the others in my group of family, friends, neighbors, or whoever I was used to hanging out with. It can get very awkward either way.

robjvargas
01-16-2015, 06:57 PM
Robjvargas, not so. Will win !

You can have the Powerball when it gets up there. MegaMillions, it's my turn, dammit.

Tazlima
01-16-2015, 08:05 PM
sassandgroove, it was by no fault of my friends. They'd call and say, "Lets meet up, and do coffee!" And I'd be like, "Nope, gotta paint." Because the electric was about to shut off. And all my clothes had holes, and I didn't want my friends to see how low I'd fallen. And I couldn't afford a damn cup of coffee anyway, much less the fuel I'd burn driving to the coffee shop. After a few months, they gave up calling.




QFT. Lack of cash will kill your social life unless you're OK with being the "mooching friend." Even if you find free activities (say, juggling in the park), money always creeps into it. Maybe everybody gets hot and wants to run and grab a gatorade. Nope, sorry, you don't get to join them. When you're that broke, every penny is allocated to more important things. Why buy drinks anyway? There's a perfectly good water fountain right there.

The thing is, your friends all want gatorade, so they bop off to the corner store. Sure, you can bow out and claim "Oh, I need to get home," but when it happens regularly, your friends come to one of two possible conclusions:

1) The correct answer: You're too broke to participate and too proud to mooch.
2) The hurt-feelings answer: For some reason you either don't really enjoy their company or don't want to be seen in public with them.

Either way, it will put stress on the friendship. Would you constantly invite someone to events if you knew in advance they'd have to decline? It's awkward all around.

Yes, there are other friends to make. People who are just as broke as you. People who appreciate the finer points of dumpster-diving behind the grocery store or participating in an hours-long jam session with no expectation of moving on to other activities.

But you see, if you then pull yourself out of that financial hole and want to do things that involve money again, you have to leave those friends behind, because they can't afford to join you.

Money dictates the activities open to you. Your choice of activities, whether it's church every morning or the strip club every night, largely defines your social group. A financial shift in either direction will require getting new friends. Not, as was implied, because there's anything wrong with the old friends, but because you no longer fit within the group dynamic.

Brutal Mustang
01-16-2015, 10:51 PM
Taz, you describe my social life to a tee. And yes, I'm poor because I'm developing a career that may go places (I'm an artist). As time goes on, I continue to pick up more regular clients, and wealthier ones. So when I get out of this hole, I may find myself in a completely different social class than before.

Alpha Echo
01-16-2015, 11:07 PM
Every time I see this thread title I see "Is Monkey the Key to Happiness."

Me too. :D

I agree with those who say it isn't necessarily the key to happiness, but it is the key to security which can and does help with the happiness.

sassandgroove
01-16-2015, 11:24 PM
Or you could just tell your friends you want to hang out but you don't have money. True friends wouldn't get upset and dump you. If you are just turning them down with out saying why, what do you expect?

robjvargas
01-16-2015, 11:33 PM
Or you could just tell your friends you want to hang out but you don't have money. True friends wouldn't get upset and dump you. If you are just turning them down with out saying why, what do you expect?

Sass: Once, maybe twice, I'm with you. What if this repeats more? What if the paycheck (if there is one) is spent before it ever gets to you, and you can't afford it 3, 4, 5 times in a row?

That strains friendships. Even true ones.

wampuscat
01-16-2015, 11:47 PM
The most enjoyable times I've had with the best friends in my life have always been inexpensive. Conversations, walks together, playing a card game, etc.

If a friend knew that financially I wasn't able to participate in activities and they just stopped hanging out with me, I'd assume they cared about the activity, not who they were doing the activity with. I'd rather spend time with people who want to spend time with me.

Brutal Mustang
01-16-2015, 11:49 PM
That strains friendships. Even true ones.

Yes. Also, I work sixteen hours a day, because I have to. (I'm on here posting because I'm waiting for a glaze to dry.) Other poor people I know have two to four jobs. So time to spend with friends is another issue.

mccardey
01-17-2015, 12:44 AM
I often see the advice that the poorer person should just explain the situation and "real friends" will adapt with pleasure. I wonder if there's a bit of privilege operating when people say that? Because poverty isn't just about elective spending: it's also - in a well-off society - often riddled with shame and emotional exhaustion. If being broke is unusual and short-term - fine: but being poor with a long-term outlook (say single mother, say illness, say business break-down) is different. You will have different feelings about the need to make your excuses or explanations than your wealthier friends will have about receiving them. That can be shaming.

And when you're poor, you don't have the luxury of not agonising about how to spend your money. One of the first things that goes is the ability to say "Yeah, why not?" at the same speed as everyone else. Counting the pennies is bloody exhausting.

wampuscat
01-17-2015, 12:53 AM
I often see the advice that the poorer person should just explain the situation and "real friends" will adapt with pleasure. I wonder if there's a bit of privilege operating when people say that? Because poverty isn't just about elective spending: it's also - in a well-off society - often riddled with shame and emotional exhaustion. If being broke is unusual and short-term - fine: but being poor with a long-term outlook (say single mother, say illness, say business break-down) is different. You will have different feelings about the need to make your excuses or explanations than your wealthier friends will have about receiving them. That can be shaming.

And when you're poor, you don't have the luxury of not agonising about how to spend your money. One of the first things that goes is the ability to say "Yeah, why not?" at the same speed as everyone else. Counting the pennies is bloody exhausting.

This is very true.

Brutal Mustang
01-17-2015, 01:35 AM
So true, mccardey, every word of it.

In my case, I quite working in a machine shop to become an artist. Many of my friends told me not to (looking out for my own best interest, of course). So of course, I don't want to hang out with them until I'm a success because of the 'I told you so' complex. Of course they would never say that to my face. But I'd feel like they're thinking it.

Also, my friends won't understand the things I now understand about life.

They don't know what it's like to go two days without food, and not because of some dumb fasting fad.

Or the humiliation of visiting the local food bank.

Or to battle foreclosure.

Or to never answer unknown phone calls, because it's probably a creditor.

Or to never invite anyone over, because you don't have toilet paper, and have been using washcloths.

What makes it worse, is, in my case, I own a house with two acres, a couple of horses, and a really big truck. To an outsider, I don't look that poor. Truth is, I've managed to feed my horses, while going hungry myself. And my truck is a necessity for where I live. And my home is way out in the country, so it costs the same as a studio city apartment. But the fact that I have these things makes people less sympathetic, you know?

Jamesaritchie
01-17-2015, 01:42 AM
Don't tax your health over making more money, as it's not bound to give you the desired happiness your heart is yearning for.
If a man working so hard (e.g 16 or 18 hrs out of 24 hrs) then he has no time left for personal relationships and leisure.
People don't experience wealth unless they compare it with others, and once they satisfy one set of their aspirations, the other emerges.
THE respectable Members of the Forum !
Do you also feel same ? Share your thoughts....

People who make a lot of money very often don't work hard at all. They work smarter, not harder. Those who do spend all day and half the night working seldom do so because it makes them millions of dollars, they do so because they love what they're doing. Satisfying one set of aspirations, and then finding another set, IS their idea of happiness. Nothing wrong with this, at all.

Money is always better than no money. Anyone who thinks otherwise has never live din poverty, and had a lot of money later on to contrast it with.

Jamesaritchie
01-17-2015, 01:46 AM
I'm in the "money makes life easier" camp.

I think money has nothing to do with happiness, or if it does it's a very small part of it. Family, friends, loved ones, a sense of contentment and self worth... all those go a long way towards happiness.

And having all those things without a good deal of money is almost impossible. Even raising a family costs a fortune, and I've never known anyone who was content when they had money trouble.

You can have millions of dollars, and still have all the things you mention, and in a better, much more contented way.

Tazlima
01-17-2015, 01:49 AM
True friends wouldn't get upset and dump you.?

She didn't say they did either of those things. They didn't get upset and they didn't dump her, the invitations just eventually fizzled out because she never accepted them. It's just one more way that people drift apart.

When you reach that level of broke, you come to realize that there are very few activities that genuinely cost nothing at all. Hanging out at a friend's house is all well and good unless the friend lives beyond a reasonable walking/biking distance. Then you have to pay for gas or bus fare. Having people over to your house? Well, first of all, do you live someplace that you are willing for people to see? If so, don't forget that it's courteous to offer guests a snack and ramen isn't going to cut it. OK, cheese and crackers all around (dammit, that was tomorrow's dinner). Get invited to a party? It's rude to show up empty-handed. Maybe you can donate plasma to pay for that cheap box of wine that looks so pathetic next to the beautiful fruit platter someone else picked up at the grocery store. Going to the mall and windowshopping while your companions buy things qualifies as masochism.

I went through a long period of the sort of financial hardship that Mustang is dealing with now and it's hard to convey the ceaseless tyrrany of money in those circumstances.

You nap through your lunch break because you can't afford food. Of course, you do this in secret because you don't want your coworkers' pity. You prioratize maintaining your car above maintaining your health because that car is not only your transportation to your crappy job, but your backup plan for housing if you can't pay your rent. The idea of getting even a minor infection or injury is terrifying because that expense will cost you your home.

Then here come your old friends. They've got cozy jobs in middle management. They can buy a candy bar with the spare change in the bottom of their purse without even thinking about it. Heck, they can even spend $5.00 at Starbucks and not care!

You end up with mixed feelings: a bizarre combination of embarrassment at not being able to match them and scorn at their wasteful ways. Imagine how you would feel if you went to dinner with a millionaire and your companion dropped $1,200 on one meal. You're thinking, "Geez, I could have used that money on so many more important things. How can you just throw it away it like that?" Even if they're treating you, it feels wasteful and wrong.

Only it's not $1,200, it's $5, and you're perfectly aware that objectively it's not that much, and it's not a one-time freak situation, but a daily ordeal. You don't dare voice those thoughts because people would think you were one of those crazy people who lived through the Great Depression and now, despite half a century of fiscally stable living, insist on bringing home those two tablespoons of leftover McDonalds coffee to finish later.

Then, if you're broke enough for long enough, you wake up one day and realize that you've become that person. No amount of money will ever be enough to erase that niggling fear that what little life you've built for yourself could fall apart at any moment. You've become impossible to shop for at holidays because during the lean times, wanting things you couldn't afford was too painful so you trained yourself not to want anything. Now you can't turn it off.

sassandgroove
01-17-2015, 01:56 AM
I often see the advice that the poorer person should just explain the situation and "real friends" will adapt with pleasure. I wonder if there's a bit of privilege operating when people say that? Because poverty isn't just about elective spending: it's also - in a well-off society - often riddled with shame and emotional exhaustion. If being broke is unusual and short-term - fine: but being poor with a long-term outlook (say single mother, say illness, say business break-down) is different. You will have different feelings about the need to make your excuses or explanations than your wealthier friends will have about receiving them. That can be shaming.

And when you're poor, you don't have the luxury of not agonising about how to spend your money. One of the first things that goes is the ability to say "Yeah, why not?" at the same speed as everyone else. Counting the pennies is bloody exhausting.So am I to assume from this post that you assume that I have never been poor? Because you would be wrong.

mccardey
01-17-2015, 02:03 AM
So am I to assume from this post that you assume that I have never been poor? Because you would be wrong.

No - I specifically didn't quote your post because *ahem* I knew it would be careless to make assumptions like that about someone I don't know. But your post, and some others, did get me thinking along the lines I mentioned, yes. Not that it's the first time I've thought it, of course.

I've been - not poor, perhaps, because I've always lived in a country with universal health care. But I've been broke. The kind of broke that I would now class as poor, in my country, in my time. But I was young, and optimistic. Even so, it was bloody hard. I have a lot of time for people who are struggling with all the issues around it. I'm glad you got through it. :)

Brutal Mustang
01-17-2015, 02:05 AM
Tazlima, your whole post had me howling. You know, you know.

sassandgroove
01-17-2015, 02:19 AM
No - I specifically didn't quote your post because *ahem* I knew it would be careless to make assumptions like that about someone I don't know. But your post, and some others, did get me thinking along the lines I mentioned, yes. Not that it's the first time I've thought it, of course.

I've been - not poor, perhaps, because I've always lived in a country with universal health care. But I've been broke. The kind of broke that I would now class as poor, in my country, in my time. But I was young, and optimistic. Even so, it was bloody hard. I have a lot of time for people who are struggling with all the issues around it. I'm glad you got through it. :)I suppose it is possible for some people to not realize what it is like to not have money and not realize how hard it is for their friend who keeps not participating. I guess I've been lucky with my friends because when I didn't have any money I still had friends to hang out with. Our money is tight right now, we're not poor but we do have a tight budget because we reached our debt ceiling when we had to get a new hot water heater, and we can't catch a break, with home repairs and illnesses and such. Last year at Christmas I asked one of our friends what his kids would like as gifts and everything he suggested was expensive (for us anyway). I just flat out told him to suggest something else and gave him a price range and he said he hadn't even thought about the price of his suggestions. We've had friends over instead of going out to eat and ask them to bring a side or a dessert, stuff like that lately. With my health issues the house is a mess and I just tell them to deal with it. They do. I guess I'm lucky.

Brutal Mustang
01-17-2015, 02:32 AM
I guess I'm lucky.

Yep. You must be in a place where you're very connected no matter what. It's not so easy for the rest of us. In my case, I live far from civilization. I'm uncomfortable asking friends to drive out this far. It's not only a lot of gas, but time as well.

MaryMumsy
01-17-2015, 02:55 AM
I've never been desperately poor (well, we were when I was a baby, but I was too young to notice), but I have been without grocery money. We had some very interesting dinners those weeks.

A friend of mine of 25+ years was comfortable when I met her. Then she married a guy with pots of money. We were still friends, but saw each other less. After they were divorced, the rich 'friends' disappeared, and I was still there. She told me the reason she saw me less when she was married was because of him. He could tell the money didn't impress me. She is now just barely getting by. But we are still friends.

MM

Seven-Deuce
01-17-2015, 04:11 AM
So long as food costs money and man needs to eat, it's a key to happiness. However, I do believe it has diminishing returns.

Ken
01-17-2015, 05:02 AM
Yep. You must be in a place where you're very connected no matter what. It's not so easy for the rest of us. In my case, I live far from civilization. I'm uncomfortable asking friends to drive out this far. It's not only a lot of gas, but time as well.

You can fly 'em out by private plane when you make it big ;-)

Brutal Mustang
01-17-2015, 05:35 AM
You can fly 'em out by private plane when you make it big ;-)

Sure thing, Ken. Or helicopter. That's what the ambulance looks like out here.

Once!
01-17-2015, 01:03 PM
I'm currently reading "Happiness by Design" by Paul Dolan. He argues that money is pretty fundamental to happiness up to a certain income level, then the benefits tail off pretty quickly beyond that point. There is no level of income where total happiness is guaranteed.

WhirlyGirly
01-18-2015, 06:16 AM
Yes. Money is the key to happiness, provided it does not come with strings attached (such as long hours at work).

mario_c
01-18-2015, 08:20 PM
Best answer I've heard: "The thing about money is it allows you to forget about money." That's the income I want, and I'm too lucky to be on my way towards it.
But being poor teaches you good habits, like just because you can pay $5 for a coffee, doesn't mean you should. ;) Like learn how to stop spending and make things yourself, or fix them when they break/tear/get old. I'll never forget those lessons.

Bryan Methods
01-18-2015, 11:08 PM
There's always someone with more money to compare yourself with! That's the problem...money in and of itself doesn't bring happiness. Improving your situation is what brings happiness. And bringing happiness to others, too.

But having too little money certainly causes misery. And that's the case for far too many people, I fear.

Maze Runner
01-18-2015, 11:11 PM
It's freedom, freedom of choice. You live where you want, drive what you want, send your kids to private schools, if you want.

Maryn
01-19-2015, 02:21 AM
No matter how many times I read the subject line in the list of New Posts, I read this one as


Is Monkey a key to Happiness?

I don't think so. I've got no monkey and I'm pretty happy.

Maryn, monkey-free

Kylabelle
01-19-2015, 03:56 AM
Money see, money do.

I answer, yes, it is a key. Not the key, but golly it sure does help.

jaus tail
01-19-2015, 08:21 AM
i think of it as a nutrient to a healthy body. to be healthy you need carbs, proteins, vitamins, fats n exercise.

money is one of the nutrient. there are other nutrients needed for a healthy body.

if you only eat carbs you wont be all healthy. your senses need vitamins and minerals.

it doesnt have to be yes or no.

friends, peace of mind, clear conscience are also important nutrient. the lack of one of them can wreck a life.