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Arisa81
09-24-2007, 03:33 AM
I am looking to start reading some current and popular ya fiction. Not that I can really do that while our libraries are still on strike here, but this would be a list that I am sure we could all use to keep current. I'm only 26, but I'm sure I am quite out of the loop when it comes to teenagers.Who are the ya authors of today?
Please share book titles that you know are popular now, or even titles of past that have never lost that 'spark.' Thanks!

scarletpeaches
09-24-2007, 03:42 AM
Meg Rosoff is the first author who springs to mind.

Shady Lane
09-24-2007, 03:59 AM
John Green's novels: Looking for Alaska and An Abundance of Katherines.

Anything by Sarah Dessen.

Ned Vizzini's: Be More Chill, Teen Angst...Nah, It's Kind of a Funny Story.

The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky.

I think most people who read any YA have read at least some of those.

scarletpeaches
09-24-2007, 04:01 AM
I haven't read any. :D

roskoebaby
09-24-2007, 04:10 AM
This Lullabye-Sarah Dessen and Looking for Alaska get my vote. Twilight is good too if you don't want as much edge.

Shady Lane
09-24-2007, 04:11 AM
I haven't read any. :D

Really?? Read Perks.

ETA: Good call, roskoe: Those Twilight books are super popular.

scarletpeaches
09-24-2007, 04:12 AM
Is it American? 'Cause I much prefer YA set in Britain. It's more relevant to me and my imagined readers.

Danger Jane
09-24-2007, 04:13 AM
oh I hate Twilight :tongue


A Great and Terrible Beauty by Libba Bray

Feed, forgot the author

Shady Lane
09-24-2007, 04:13 AM
Hmm. Well.

I always assumed it was American.

But it never says. The setting is very unimportant.

ETA: This was for Scarlet.

Danger Jane
09-24-2007, 04:14 AM
Is it American? 'Cause I much prefer YA set in Britain. It's more relevant to me and my imagined readers.

Yeah human beings are very different from.....British people.

scarletpeaches
09-24-2007, 04:14 AM
Hmm. Well.

I always assumed it was American.

But it never says. The setting is very unimportant.

ETA: This was for Scarlet.

Not to me it isn't. There's so much in American novels that doesn't apply over here. An entirely different way of life. I lost track of the amount of American YA I read myself as a teenager containing phrases that made me think, "What the shit are they talking about?"

Even things like kids driving to school...it just doesn't happen over here (see Twilight; it really bugged me when the MC temporarily whined over her dad buying her a vehicle and I thought, ungrateful swine. Count yourself lucky to have a motor at all).

YA books have to involve the reader, make them feel as if the author has some idea what life is like for them and if it's set in a place where the typical way of life is different to that of the reader you run the risk of losing them (unless it's something like fantasy where you're deliberately setting the book in another world).

Danger Jane
09-24-2007, 04:15 AM
Hmm. Well.

I always assumed it was American.

But it never says. The setting is very unimportant.

ETA: This was for Scarlet.


All those ones you listed? Yeah, they're American. Perks takes place in like a generic town and Alaska takes place in I want to say like Georgia? Forget where Sarah Dessen's books take place but they DO mention people driving on the proper side of the road so it must be America

Shady Lane
09-24-2007, 04:15 AM
Not to me it isn't.

Didn't mean in general. I meant in Perks.

It's intentionally quite vague. Many of the characters aren't named, and he tells us the ones that are named are probably given fake ones. I'm sure Mr. Chbosky wanted the book to be able to take place anywhere.

Danger Jane
09-24-2007, 04:18 AM
Didn't mean in general. I meant in Perks.

It's intentionally quite vague. Many of the characters aren't named, and he tells us the ones that are named are probably given fake ones. I'm sure Mr. Chbosky wanted the book to be able to take place anywhere.

Yeah the whole premise is that the kid is writing to this anonymous person and changing names and stuff so the person doesn't figure out who or where or anything.

But uh, probably it serves a higher purpose.

His brother goes to "Penn State" which he says might not be the real college, for football, which is true, and the college is within driving distance. Probably not UK.

scarletpeaches
09-24-2007, 04:20 AM
I've heard of Perks but never seen it on the shelves here. I'll keep an eye out for it though.

Shady Lane
09-24-2007, 04:20 AM
Yeah the whole premise is that the kid is writing to this anonymous person and changing names and stuff so the person doesn't figure out who or where or anything.

But uh, probably it serves a higher purpose.

His brother goes to "Penn State" which he says might not be the real college, for football, which is true, and the college is within driving distance. Probably not UK.

Good call. Forgot that bit. And he talks about going North to see his family, right?

I always assumed he lived in my hometown. Which I think was the point.

Danger Jane
09-24-2007, 04:21 AM
Yeah I think you're supposed to feel that way.

Anyway SP they use tons of cheesy britishisms so you're fine :tongue that's why it sells so well...American teenage girls are suckers for cheesy britishisms.

scarletpeaches
09-24-2007, 04:22 AM
Do they all drink Earl Grey and say "What ho!" a lot? :D

Shady Lane
09-24-2007, 04:23 AM
Do they all drink Earl Grey and say "What ho!" a lot? :D

AHH! MARTYN PIG!

Sorry, just has a flash of British YA.

I'm so in love with Kevin Brooks.

Danger Jane
09-24-2007, 04:23 AM
TONS of Earl Grey

Like, PUKAGE.


And then they go CHEERIO! WOT WOT!

Shady Lane
09-24-2007, 04:24 AM
Wait wait wait guys.

INDIGO'S STAR is British.

SP, tell me you've read Indigo's Star. PLEASE.

So it's technically MG but it's the best book I've ever read.

It's SO British. The Dad says, "Off you pop."

scarletpeaches
09-24-2007, 04:25 AM
I haven't as I like to read books in sequence. I have the first in the series sitting on a shelf in my home. Does that get me off the hook?

Danger Jane
09-24-2007, 04:26 AM
no this hook is a big one


Like it doubles as a spit for roasting

yummmm I love roasted peaches

scarletpeaches
09-24-2007, 04:27 AM
David Almond and Theresa Breslin. Can't believe I forgot those authors.

Shady Lane
09-24-2007, 04:27 AM
Yes. Especially since you recognized the title and whatnot.

Saffy's Angel is quite good as well, but not as good as Indigo. And Permanent Rose is amazing. Caddy Ever After is kind of a letdown.

I like to read them in sequence too...didn't realize Indigo was part of a series when I picked it up, and by the time I figured it out I was WAY too hooked.

bethany
09-24-2007, 04:28 AM
Damn, there wre like 15 posts while I was looking at my bookshelf. I feel very sloooooow

To fill in a few blanks (I'm turning into a know it all)- Feed is by MT Anderson
Looking for Alaska, is set in Alabama (but I don't know if that's even relevant now)

I'll add that Laurie Halse Anderson's books are a good place to start- Speak and Twisted (though I really preferred Speak) looking at bookshelf now....

The Uglies Trilogy by Scott Westerberg are good (though I guess they could be MG)

KL Going is great- Fat Kid Rules the World and Saint Iggy

The Ellen Hopkins books are really popular right now- Crank, Glass, etc.

scarletpeaches
09-24-2007, 04:29 AM
Judy Blume's books are full of boobies and wanking if you're that way inclined. :D

Shady Lane
09-24-2007, 04:29 AM
To fill in a few blanks (I'm turning into a know it all)- Feed is by MT Anderson
Looking for Alaska, is set in Alabama (but I don't know if that's even relevant now)

I'll add that Laurie Halse Anderson's books are a good place to start- Speak and Twisted (though I really preferred Speak) looking at bookshelf now....

The Uglies Trilogy by Scott Westerberg are good (though I guess they could be MG)

KL Going is great- Fat Kid Rules the World and Saint Iggy

The Ellen Hopkins books are really popular right now- Crank, Glass, etc.

Love K.L. Going. HATED Twisted...Catalyst was good, though.

scarletpeaches
09-24-2007, 04:30 AM
Henry Tumour - Anthony McGowan (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Henry-Tumour-Definitions-Anthony-McGowan/dp/009948823X/ref=sr_1_1/202-5799664-9662257?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1190593789&sr=1-1)

Any book that has 'arsecheese' as its first word deserves a mention.

Shady Lane
09-24-2007, 04:31 AM
SP, I swear you're just making up names.

Danger Jane
09-24-2007, 04:32 AM
OMG SPEAK!!! I FORGOT SPEAK!!!


And fat kid rules the world.

Ah.

Uh, catcher in the rye?

scarletpeaches
09-24-2007, 04:32 AM
SP, I swear you're just making up names.

Which is why I provided a link for the McGowan book.

Shady Lane
09-24-2007, 04:32 AM
*vomits on Catcher in the Rye.*

scarletpeaches
09-24-2007, 04:33 AM
*vomits on Shady Lane*

bethany
09-24-2007, 04:34 AM
Catcher in the Rye ALWAYS makes me think of King Dork now. (by Frank Portman if anyone is taking notes)

I need to take Twisted off my loved it list, I just wanted to love it so much.

Shady Lane
09-24-2007, 04:35 AM
*vomits on Shady Lane*

Anyone have a towel?

Never got into it, got to say. I'm a Great Gatsbyite myself.

bethany
09-24-2007, 04:35 AM
I had Holden on my possible baby names list. I got vetoed. No vomiting on Holden, or Shady. No vomiting period. I have to make up some lesson plans for tomorrow. You guys are distracting me.

Danger Jane
09-24-2007, 04:36 AM
The Rules of Survival by Nancy Werlin

Does Twisted suck?

Shady Lane
09-24-2007, 04:36 AM
I have Indigo on my baby name list.

I'm preparing to have children who hate me.

Danger Jane
09-24-2007, 04:36 AM
I had Holden on my possible baby names list. I got vetoed. No vomiting on Holden, or Shady. No vomiting period. I have to make up some lesson plans for tomorrow. You guys are distracting me.

Can one of those plans be to cancel the essay you had due on Tuesday due to us spending all weekend writing the essay for Monday?

bethany
09-24-2007, 04:38 AM
Maybe my expectations for Twisted were just too high. I mean it didn't suck, but it didn't not suck.

Wicked Lovely was good. (Melissa Marr)
oh and you guys should read Revenge of the Homecoming Queen by my CP Stephanie Hale. (puts in blatant pitch for beloved critique partner)

Shady Lane
09-24-2007, 04:39 AM
I think it sucked.

bethany
09-24-2007, 04:40 AM
My classes don't write essays.

Arisa81
09-24-2007, 04:40 AM
Wow, nice response to the thread, thanks everyone.

How about 'series' like Love Stories? Anything like that around these days?

bethany
09-24-2007, 04:41 AM
Um there are series like Gossip Girls and the A list, and lots of others- depends on the type you're looking for- I'm not familiar with Love Stories.

Danger Jane
09-24-2007, 04:41 AM
NO ESSAYS?!?!?

bethany
09-24-2007, 04:46 AM
They have to do an analytical piece, but that's not really an essay it's defending a point. And right now we're doing persuasive letters and editorials.

I don't use the text book, either. If I can help it.

Danger Jane
09-24-2007, 04:54 AM
I don't think we have a textbook. I haven't had an english textbook in like six years. I have to analyze how the structure of a flash fiction story affects the meaning.

bethany
09-24-2007, 05:01 AM
Textbooks are a huge waste of money, much better to buy actual literature and stuff. Those things are very expensive.

Danger Jane
09-24-2007, 05:05 AM
How do you even put together a textbook for English?? I mean...history, science, I can understand. But languages, stuff like Wheelock's Latin is just fine. And I don't see why they don't make like a $5 paperback math thing like Wheelock's. But I don't take math so it doesn't matter :D

ishtar'sgate
09-24-2007, 09:41 AM
I am looking to start reading some current and popular ya fiction. Not that I can really do that while our libraries are still on strike here, but this would be a list that I am sure we could all use to keep current. I'm only 26, but I'm sure I am quite out of the loop when it comes to teenagers.Who are the ya authors of today?
Please share book titles that you know are popular now, or even titles of past that have never lost that 'spark.' Thanks!
Well I just have to make a blantant promo for my own novel. :DIt was nominated for the Ontario Library Association White Pine Young Readers Choice Award in 2006.
Linnea

reenkam
09-24-2007, 10:10 AM
I think David Levithan is fairly popular right now. Well, in my head at least. And if not in other people's head, he should be. (I feel the same way about Laurie Stolarz, fyi)

There's Garth Nix. He'd kind of younger YA though, so maybe that doesn't count. Anthony Horowitz is popular right now, though I haven't read anything by him so I don't know how great he is. There's also Gabrielle Zevin (I heard Elsewhere, but she just came out with Memoirs of a Teenage Amnesiac) and Meg Cabot's been producing books like a factory (well, it seems that way to me, at least). Then there's Holly Black and also the Private series (it's like Gossip Girls and the A-List) by Kate Brian.

moondance
09-24-2007, 11:22 AM
Current favourites of mine:

Garth Nix (the Sabriel, Lirael, Abhorsen trilogy - his other series isn't as good)
Susan Cooper (Dark is Rising series - although not exactly 'current')
Kevin Brooks (Lucas is the best, although I also liked Candy and Road of the Dead)
Tim Bowler (try Midget or Starseeker)
Celia Rees (Pirates! and Witch Child)

I'm a member of the Scattered Authors' Society (http://www.scatteredauthors.org), so I'd also like to recommend books by my friends ;-)

Tabitha Suzuma - A Note of Madness, From Where I Stand
Mary Hoffman - Stravaganza series, The Falconer's Knot (shortlisted for perhaps the biggest Children's fiction prize we have this year)
Sherry Ashworth
Nicola Morgan

um...isn't there another thread on this somewhere?

Oh, and mine of course!! (although not widely available in the US): Red Tears (to be followed by Screwed in April next year)

Momento Mori
09-24-2007, 04:23 PM
Arisa81:
Who are the ya authors of today?

I'd rate Melvin Burgess and Malorie Blackman as two of the biggest YA authors out there right now. Both deal with contemporary subjects and are not afraid to be controversial - Burgess has written books about drug abuse and underage sex, Blackman has written about racism and is particularly interested in science-type themes (I'd recommend her Pig-Heart Boy for younger YA readers).

J. K. Rowling is probably the best know childrens/YA writer out there (some series about a kid wizard apparently). If you're into fantasy then Susan Cooper and Diana Wynne Jones are the two stalwarts of the field - please don't go to see the God-awful looking adaptation of Cooper's Dark Is Rising as it seems to bear no relationship with the book whatsoever.

Anthony Horowitz is one of the 'boy audience' writers and is most famous for Alex Rider series (his new book for that, Snakehead, gets released in November). They're about a teenage spy and they're okay, although I find that Alex leaves me emotionally cold (for a kid who sees so much death and destruction, he has no psychological reaction at all). I do however rate Horowitz's fantasy series, The Power of Five, which are cracking books - the latest one is Nightrise and they're all v. well written and seriously creepy.

If you're into teenage spies, Charlie Higson has released a number of teenage James Bond books which have had a good reception. Not my cup of tea, but he stays faithful to the spirit of the Ian Fleming originals, albeit with less nookie. Andy McNabb has a series about a boy soldier that are supposed to be brutal (I actually couldn't get through the first chapter). McNabb is a former member of the SAS so he doesn't pull his punches, but the books are wildly popular with boys in the UK.

Returning to fantasy, G. P. Taylor is well regarded in the fantasy realm although I'll put my hand up and admit that he really doesn't ring my bell in the slightest. Far better is Michelle Paver's Wolf Brother series which I think is up to book 4 - set in Neolithic times it's about a boy who is effectively raised by wolves. Paver is meticulous in her research and she's won a lot of plaudits. Joanne Harris, bestselling author of Chocolat recently moved into YA fantasy with a book about trolls - the title's something like Runes - I can look it up for you, but it's got good reviews.

Looking to the USA, Holly Black's trilogy on the fae was completed this year with Ironside. I think Black's a great writer in terms of her imagery, but I found her plots a little thin. Melissa Marr's Wicked Lovely is a great debut novel, also about faeries. Cassandra Claire's first in a trilogy, City of Bones, which is urban fantasy with demons et al also came out this year, although I found it a little too cliched for my taste.

Scott Westerfield has already been mentioned and is definitely worth a look, as is Justine Larbalestier. CHina Melvielle (and I haven't spelt that correctly) does weird fantasy type stuff or there's Philip Reeve's whose Mortal Engines trilogy is mind-blowing.

So ... yeah. I'm beginning to run out of names actually. I'll take a look on my bookshelves and see if I can come up with more.

MM

Writer14
09-24-2007, 04:30 PM
Twilight, New Moon, and Eclipse by Stephenie Meyer


Also, popular amongst me and a bunch of my friends are Mistborn: The Final Empire, Mistborn: The Well of Acension, and Elantris by Brandon Sanderson.

=]

scarletpeaches
09-24-2007, 05:27 PM
Grace Dent's Diary of a Chav novels; there are three so far. I believe the third is about to be published or has just been.

moondance
09-24-2007, 08:55 PM
Oh, Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer too.

Shady Lane
09-25-2007, 12:16 AM
Current favourites of mine:

Garth Nix (the Sabriel, Lirael, Abhorsen trilogy - his other series isn't as good)
Susan Cooper (Dark is Rising series - although not exactly 'current')
Kevin Brooks (Lucas is the best, although I also liked Candy and Road of the Dead)
Tim Bowler (try Midget or Starseeker)
Celia Rees (Pirates! and Witch Child)

I'm a member of the Scattered Authors' Society (http://www.scatteredauthors.org), so I'd also like to recommend books by my friends ;-)

Tabitha Suzuma - A Note of Madness, From Where I Stand
Mary Hoffman - Stravaganza series, The Falconer's Knot (shortlisted for perhaps the biggest Children's fiction prize we have this year)
Sherry Ashworth
Nicola Morgan

um...isn't there another thread on this somewhere?

Oh, and mine of course!! (although not widely available in the US): Red Tears (to be followed by Screwed in April next year)

Is Lucas really the best?? It's the only one of his I haven't finished. Really didn't like Candy, loved Road of the Dead, loved Martyn Pig, loved Being (was the inspiration for my WIP), ehhh about Kissing the Rain.

moondance
09-25-2007, 11:38 AM
Each to their own, Shady ;) It's the one that's won all the awards anyway, and it is still my favourite.

Agree with you about Kissing The Rain though - what is with that ending?!

Not read Being yet (oh, confessions!)

Arisa81
09-26-2007, 03:37 AM
I definitely have a lot of stuff to read. And I can't even do that until the libraries are off strike. This sucks. Definitely don't have the $ to go buying everything I wanna read, lol. I wish.

Thanks, everyone!

Shady Lane
09-26-2007, 04:05 AM
Each to their own, Shady ;) It's the one that's won all the awards anyway, and it is still my favourite.

Agree with you about Kissing The Rain though - what is with that ending?!

Not read Being yet (oh, confessions!)

Read it!!

I was seriously asking about Lucas. I liked what I read, just never ended up finishing it. Harry Potter got in the way and then I got distracted.

I'm not even sure I understood Kissing the Rain. I've tried to reread it like five times, but I can't get through it.

TrishD
09-27-2007, 07:58 AM
Some of my favorite YA authors right now are Maureen Johnson (13 Little Blue Envelopes), E. Lockhart (The Boyfriend List & The Boy Book) and Kate Brian's books that are not part of the Private series. I don't dislike the Private series, I just like her others--like Lucky T & Megan Meade's Guide to the McGowan Boys--better.

Mandy
09-29-2007, 08:17 AM
Oh, Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer too.

I love Artemis Fowl! :)

I also like Sara Manning's GUITAR GIRL. It's British, if I remember right. I also just finished TITHE by Holly Black and am a huge fan.

I wish I had a big library full of all the books mentioned! I can't wait to read PERKS and A GREAT AND TERRIBLE BEAUTY.

Provrb1810meggy
09-29-2007, 06:44 PM
DRAMARAMA by E. Lockhart is fabulous. I also enjoyed SECRET IDENTITY OF DEVON DELANEY by Lauren Barnholdt, which is a tween novel, and IF I HAVE A WICKED STEPMOTHER, WHERE'S MY PRINCE? (i think that's the title) by Melissa Kantor, which is YA.

Very popular with teenagers is I'D LOVE YOU, BUT THEN I'D HAVE TO KILL YOU by Ally Carter, a YA book about girls at a spy school. The sequel, CROSS MY (or your? urgh..i'm having trouble today) HEART, AND HOPE TO SPY is coming out soon.

I think a lot of what is "current" and "popular" depends on who you ask and what kind of fiction they like. Unless you decide to go by the bestseller list alone, in which case you'll probably find titles like the TWILIGHT trilogy by Stephanie Meyer and WICKED LOVELY by Melissa Marr.

scarletpeaches
09-29-2007, 06:45 PM
I just bought "Before I Die" by Jenny Downham.

TrishD
10-01-2007, 03:36 PM
I also like Sara Manning's GUITAR GIRL. It's British, if I remember right.

Guitar Girl is a great book!

Chicken Warrior
10-01-2007, 08:31 PM
Ha, I haven't read any of this. Like, quite literaly, ANY of it. Actually, I can't remember the last time I just walked into a library/bookstore and browsed through the 'remotely new/mainstream' section. However, I hear a lot of writers talking about John Green. He's definitely made a name for himself. Also watch Hether Brewer, although I think she does slightly younger YA.

Hopcus
02-06-2008, 10:33 AM
Melissa Marr (of Wicked Lovely fame) is coming out with a new book called Ink Exchange. It'll be available in April.