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HollyB
09-23-2004, 06:32 AM
Anyone heard of Draumr Publishing?

From the website, it looks primarily to be a romance novel publisher, but will be "offering books in all genres."

www.draumrpublishing.com (http://www.draumrpublishing.com)

A box pops up saying "Draumr is the Old Norse root for the word 'dream'... therefore Draumr Publishing has become the root of all dreams... yours and mine."

This tagline sounds like a big red flag to me (witness this discussion at Making Light nielsenhayden.com/makingl...l#005540). (http://nielsenhayden.com/makinglight/archives/005540.html#005540).)

James D Macdonald
09-23-2004, 08:56 AM
Anyone heard of Draumr Publishing?

There's a thread on them <a href="http://www.writers.net/forum/read/11/32069/32069Vf" target="_new">here</a> at Writers.net.

CaoPaux
07-16-2005, 01:18 AM
Oh my.

https://www.draumrpublishing.com/index.php


Rida Allen, Co-owner and Jill-of-all-Trades

Rida is a contemporary romance novel author who writes her books only with full-figured heroines. She has been writing since her youth and was first published in 2001. Her first book, "Great Love", was published by a small publishing company in Frederick, Maryland, where they utilized the print-on-demand technology to offer new authors the chance to achieve their dreams. Rida published her second book with iUniverse, wanting to explore the world of self-publishing. "The Legacy Tree" was the first book in a series of five connected books. The second in the series, "Truth and Lies", was picked up by her original publisher in Frederick, Maryland. It was about that time that Rida began exploring the possibility of opening her own print-on-demand publishing company where she could help other romance novel authors get their BBW books out into the world. Rida is the main employee at Draumr Publishing.

Be sure you're sitting down while you read their FAQ page. I'm sure they mean well, but.... :faint:

bloemmarc
12-20-2005, 09:31 AM
How good is this compnany

vipersmile
12-20-2005, 11:07 PM
my best advice to you in querying these companies is to follow Dave's thread

preditors and editors is a huge and important tool in isolating publishing decisions.

Eric-

James D. Macdonald
12-20-2005, 11:09 PM
How good is this compnany

Have you personally ever read anything they've published? Have you ever seen anything they publish in a bookstore?

PeeDee
12-20-2005, 11:26 PM
We are currently seeking submissions for this line of books. The DC line has a minimum word count requirement of 40,000 words and there currently is no maximum. DC books must have a big beautiful woman heroine but may or may not have a big handsome man hero. Our preference at this time is to accept only submissions where the heroine does not lose weight to gain acceptance and/or a mate. Health issues may be addressed but must not be the main storyline.

*blink blink*

They're about as specific as you can possibly get. I mean, that's wedging into the niche market pretty tightly.

vipersmile
12-20-2005, 11:59 PM
please see the private message I sent you.


I have tears of mercury streaming from my eyes I'm laughing so hard. My cheeks are frozen.

PeeDee
12-21-2005, 12:18 AM
Actually, I think your cheeks would be less frozen than your brain, which should be just about haywire now. Right (http://danpatch.ecn.purdue.edu/%7Eepados/mercbuild/src/poison.htm)?

;) But your point is taken.

veinglory
12-21-2005, 01:01 AM
It can't be a tiny niche--I know three different presses catering to it as a significant sub-category of chick-lit.

PeeDee
12-21-2005, 01:08 AM
By 'tiny niche,' I was mostly referring to the incredibly detailed guideline for what exactly your story has to be like before they will be inclined to accept it, that's all.

I mean, it's like running a publisher that only publishes Johnny Theremin (http://www.johnnytheremin.net/) stories.

vipersmile
12-21-2005, 01:42 AM
OH MY GOD!

JOHNY T!

OH IMPRESSIVE!
I JUST ADDED SOMETHING TO MY PANTS!

LMMAOFF!

:ROFL:

I'll have to do an interview on Johnny in my next article and ask him how things are going. Or better yet, right another horror novel, all centering around Johnny.

:roll: :Spam:

veinglory
12-21-2005, 02:02 AM
Having a heroine who is large and not trying to lose weight--that is the exact niche I was refering too which is catered to by at least 3 publishers. Is it really incredibly specific compared to, for example, genre romance with inter-racial couples (at least 6 publishers). In chicklit it is common enough to go by a widely accepted acronym BBW (big, beautiful woman)

pepperlandgirl
12-21-2005, 04:36 AM
*blink blink*

They're about as specific as you can possibly get. I mean, that's wedging into the niche market pretty tightly.

But that's just one line of theirs. THey are also seeking other fiction.


We are currently seeking submissions for Draumr Publishing fiction genres such as science fiction, fantasy, horror, mystery, adventure, suspense/thriller, non-bbw romances (including all the subgenres listed above), and gay/lesbian stories. DP has a minimum word count requirement of 50,000 words and there is currently no maximum. Please send query letters along with your first three chapters and story synopsis to submissions@draumrpublishing.com. We accept documents in both MS Word and WordPerfect formats - do not send in PDF or TXT formats. Please attach each portion of your submission as a separate document (query letter, first three chapters, synopsis). Do not send full manuscripts. At this time, we cannot accept queries for unfinished manuscripts.
Lots of publishers target certain niches with specific lines. It's hardly uncommon to have specific guidelines.

THough I did find something that caused a yellow flag or two


Rida is a contemporary romance novel author who writes her books only with full-figured heroines. She has been writing since her youth and was first published in 2001. Her first book, "Great Love", was published by a small publishing company in Frederick, Maryland, where they utilized the print-on-demand technology to offer new authors the chance to achieve their dreams. Rida published her second book with iUniverse, wanting to explore the world of self-publishing. "The Legacy Tree" was the first book in a series of five connected books. The second in the series, "Truth and Lies", was picked up by her original publisher in Frederick, Maryland. It was about that time that Rida began exploring the possibility of opening her own print-on-demand publishing company where she could help other romance novel authors get their BBW books out into the world. Rida is the main employee at Draumr Publishing. She receives and reads all submissions, makes recommendations for contract offers (fyi, she accepts all forms of M&Ms), consults on all cover art, is the main editor, is the main desktop publisher, website designer and otherwise Jill-of-all-trades. If you arenít sure who handles something, then it is probably Rida. Rida comes from a close-knit family. Her husband, Robert, is also a writer although by day, he pretends to be a computer geek.

I know that there are a lot of former PA authors who are A)talented B)smart and C)successful, but I would be wary of going with a publisher that's started by somebody who published with PA not once, but twice, if only because she might have a skewed idea of what the publishing world is actually like. Judging from her explanation of why she went with PA twice, as well as her foray into "self-publishing," I have to wonder if she even knows that PA has many, many problems. What if since PA was such a great publisher for new authors she decided to model herself after them? Of course, she could have avoided stating their name because she knows they're a scam and she's just trying to be diplomatic.

veinglory
12-21-2005, 04:54 AM
She's refering to PA there? Hmm. That is weird.

pepperlandgirl
12-21-2005, 04:56 AM
I don't know who else she could be referring to.

1) Frederick Maryland? Check
2) Print on Demand technology? Check
3) offer new authors the chance to achieve their dreams. (I think that might be verbatim from their website).

I hope it's PA and there's not another POD outfit in Frederick giving authors the chance to achieve their dreams!

Andrew Jameson
12-21-2005, 06:09 PM
Yes, it's PA. Not that I think that's necessarily bad--she's clearly not boosting PA at the present time, and I have a lot of sympathy for authors that have essentially lost their books to PA, but still might want readers to read them.

Here's a link (http://www.aromancereview.com/newvoicesoftoday/ridaallen1.phtml) to a bio of and interview with Rida, as well as some reviews of her books (Her home page (http://www.ridaallen.com/)). In another interview (http://www.loveromances.com/interview_ridaallen.html), she talks about POD; I infer that's how her publishing company prints their books (but that's only an inference).

PeeDee
12-22-2005, 06:54 PM
I wasn't really criticisings them for being a very-specific-niche publisher, honest. It just surprised me. Thas'bout'it.

I totally missed the PA reference. Ouch.

Draumr Robert
01-04-2006, 07:24 PM
Hello, citizens....

Does anyone mind if I pop in to answer any questions you might have about us?

--Robert E. Allen III
Editor, Draumr Publishing
http://www.draumrpublishing.com/
robert@draumrpublishing.com

bloemmarc
01-04-2006, 07:37 PM
Helo there. Mr. Allen.

Tell us about yourselves, and your company

Hello, citizens....

Does anyone mind if I pop in to answer any questions you might have about us?

--Robert E. Allen III
Editor, Draumr Publishing
http://www.draumrpublishing.com/
robert@draumrpublishing.com

Draumr Robert
01-04-2006, 08:18 PM
Helo there. Mr. Allen.

Tell us about yourselves, and your company


Hello.

I'm all for short and sweet. (those of you so inclined can read the more detailed accounts on our website) Draumr Publishing has been an entity for a bit over a year now. It is owned and operated by four people - Rida and I are writers, the other two are not.

During our launch year, we've released 8 books. As some of you noticed, the majority of our releases are BBW related - a genre that Draumr Publishing strongly supports. But they aren't the only genre we are publishing - Red Flash, Moon Child are both not in the BBW genre.

We do use print-on-demand digital printing, which seems to be a four-letter word to a lot of people. It has enabled us, a small printer, to compete in the marketplace without incurring the costs for huge print runs, and likewise enabled us to take risks on books. If we didn't use print-on-demand digital printing, I suspect we would not have been able to release but two of the books we've put out so far. And that, in my opinion, would have been a real shame, as they are all good books.

We accept - and recieve - submissions for all sorts of stuff. We've already accepted books number nine and ten and they will be coming out in the next few months. I'm primarily the fantasy and science fiction editor, but based on our workload I get all sorts of genres to read. (a fun part of the job, really)

A bit about me personally: I've mostly written for the adventure gaming industry, for Reaper Miniatures, SHADIS Magazine, InQuest Magazine, and a few defunct companies. You can find some of the columns I did for RPGNet on the web if you google for me.

What other questions might you have? I'm always happy to talk about us.

--Robert E. Allen III
Editor, Draumr Publishing
http://www.draumrpublishing.com/
robert@draumrpublishing.com

James D. Macdonald
01-04-2006, 09:28 PM
Who's your distributor?

veinglory
01-04-2006, 09:53 PM
Are there any particular themes, length and styles you have a particular interest in. I, personally, find the number of small publsiher out there rather daunting and I love to hear a little about personal preferences--fullt understanding that it doesn't mean you aren't open to a wide range of material.

bloemmarc
01-04-2006, 10:22 PM
Are there any particular themes, length and styles you have a particular interest in. I, personally, find the number of small publsiher out there rather daunting and I love to hear a little about personal preferences--fullt understanding that it doesn't mean you aren't open to a wide range of material.

I believe he did point out some of their specialties in BBW, and Science fiction.
By the way, I don't mean to sound ignorant, but what exactly is the BBW genre.

DaveKuzminski
01-04-2006, 10:25 PM
Big Beautiful Women, if I'm not mistaken.

bloemmarc
01-04-2006, 10:35 PM
Big Beautiful Women, if I'm not mistaken.

That's what I thought. I am just wondering what kind of genre that specializes in Big Beautiful Women belongs in the literary world. Hey, I suppose it takes all types though.

I am a fantasy author, or trying to be.

veinglory
01-04-2006, 10:56 PM
I believe he did point out some of their specialties in BBW, and Science fiction.
By the way, I don't mean to sound ignorant, but what exactly is the BBW genre.

I was thinking more specifically. e.g. BBW romance, humor--perhaps paranormal, how would that sound. What about novella length? How about gay fiction on the gay male/Bear side?

Draumr Robert
01-04-2006, 11:08 PM
Who's your distributor?


We are distributed in the US and Canada by Ingram and Baker & Taylor. We are still working to improve our international distribution further.


--Robert E. Allen III
Editor, Draumr Publishing
http://www.draumrpublishing.com/
robert@draumrpublishing.com

*edited for typo

Draumr Robert
01-04-2006, 11:15 PM
Are there any particular themes, length and styles you have a particular interest in. I, personally, find the number of small publsiher out there rather daunting and I love to hear a little about personal preferences--fullt understanding that it doesn't mean you aren't open to a wide range of material.


Is it wrong for me to say "books that interest us"? It's actually somewhat funny that you ask - just last night Rida and I were discussing that there have been a number of submissions that "weren't really our thing" but upon reading them we enjoyed them despite our typical preferences.

On paper, my preferences are fantasy and sci-fi, Rida prefers romance, Judy prefers suspense and mysteries, and Michael....well, he's weird. But all of us can appreciate good work when we see it, and move on from there.

So, please, feel free to submit to us, regardless of the genre. If we like it, we'll talk.

--Robert E. Allen III
Editor, Draumr Publishing
http://www.draumrpublishing.com/
robert@draumrpublishing.com

Draumr Robert
01-04-2006, 11:34 PM
That's what I thought. I am just wondering what kind of genre that specializes in Big Beautiful Women belongs in the literary world. Hey, I suppose it takes all types though.

I am a fantasy author, or trying to be.


Well, flat out, we like to put out romance and chick-lit books featuring heroines that our readers can relate to. That basically means women who are more realistically shaped than mainstream romances generally show. BBW in itself stands for big beautiful woman, and the demand for that particular niche, and our experience in the niche, is why we offer our Dangerous Curves line.

--Robert E. Allen III
Editor, Draumr Publishing
http://www.draumrpublishing.com/
robert@draumrpublishing.com

Draumr Robert
01-04-2006, 11:38 PM
I was thinking more specifically. e.g. BBW romance, humor--perhaps paranormal, how would that sound. What about novella length? How about gay fiction on the gay male/Bear side?


We've had a handful of gay and lesbian submissions, so we do accept them. The submission guidelines, on our site, are very specific about the handful of things we don't accept.

--Robert E. Allen III
Editor, Draumr Publishing
http://www.draumrpublishing.com/
robert@draumrpublishing.com

* - Another typo. And they let me be an EDITOR? Sheesh.

bloemmarc
01-05-2006, 02:02 AM
We've had a handful of gay and lesbian submissions, so we do accept them. The submission guidelines, on our site, are very specific about the handful of things we don't accept.

--Robert E. Allen III
Editor, Draumr Publishing
http://www.draumrpublishing.com/
robert@draumrpublishing.com

* - Another typo. And they let me be an EDITOR? Sheesh.

Have your books made it into actual bookstores, and not just online ones?

Draumr Robert
01-05-2006, 05:46 AM
Indeed we are. We're available in Borders and Barnes & Noble in the US, and (I'm told) Chapters in Canada.

--Robert E. Allen III
Editor, Draumr Publishing
http://www.draumrpublishing.com/
robert@draumrpublishing.com

victoriastrauss
01-05-2006, 06:05 AM
We are distributed in the US and Canada by Ingram and Baker & Taylor.These aren't distributors--they're wholesalers. Ideally, a small publisher should work with both.


We're available in Borders and Barnes & Noble in the US, and (I'm told) Chapters in Canada.Available (as in the books can be ordered there) or actually stocked on the shelves?

- Victoria

Draumr Robert
01-05-2006, 06:29 AM
These aren't distributors--they're wholesalers. Ideally, a small publisher should work with both.

Available (as in the books can be ordered there) or actually stocked on the shelves?

- Victoria

Hello Victoria.

We work with wholesalers in order to please big accounts. Small accounts can get books from us directly if they don't opt to order from the wholesalers. I handle fulfillment for those and direct customer orders personally.

I can't speak for every Borders and Barnes & Noble, but I know we are being stocked locally (since I've pestered them). I've gotten reports from one of our authors that her local Barnes & Noble stocks us as well. I'd be thrilled to learn we are in all of them, but I just don't know.

--Robert E. Allen III
Editor, Draumr Publishing
http://www.draumrpublishing.com/
robert@draumrpublishing.com

bloemmarc
01-05-2006, 07:00 AM
Hello Victoria.

We work with wholesalers in order to please big accounts. Small accounts can get books from us directly if they don't opt to order from the wholesalers. I handle fulfillment for those and direct customer orders personally.

I can't speak for every Borders and Barnes & Noble, but I know we are being stocked locally (since I've pestered them). I've gotten reports from one of our authors that her local Barnes & Noble stocks us as well. I'd be thrilled to learn we are in all of them, but I just don't know.

--Robert E. Allen III
Editor, Draumr Publishing
http://www.draumrpublishing.com/
robert@draumrpublishing.com


What about the editing of books, and communication with authors? How are royalties paid? Are their advances? Do you have a copy of your contract?

Draumr Robert
01-05-2006, 07:19 AM
What about the editing of books, and communication with authors? How are royalties paid? Are their advances? Do you have a copy of your contract?

1. Yes, we edit the books we release. We want them to be the best they can, so we work with our authors to get them that way. We're not heavy-handed about it; if they weren't in good shape, we would not have accepted them in the first place.

2. Feel free to come to our forums and interact with our authors; they'd be the best source of information for that. (Of course I'm going to say we are very good at communication, but what would you expect me to say?)

3. We pay royalties twice a year.

4. Our contracts are private; but I'll try and answer specific questions you might have.

--Robert E. Allen III
Editor, Draumr Publishing
http://www.draumrpublishing.com/
robert@draumrpublishing.com

bloemmarc
01-05-2006, 07:26 AM
1. Yes, we edit the books we release. We want them to be the best they can, so we work with our authors to get them that way. We're not heavy-handed about it; if they weren't in good shape, we would not have accepted them in the first place.

2. Feel free to come to our forums and interact with our authors; they'd be the best source of information for that. (Of course I'm going to say we are very good at communication, but what would you expect me to say?)

3. We pay royalties twice a year.

4. Our contracts are private; but I'll try and answer specific questions you might have.

--Robert E. Allen III
Editor, Draumr Publishing
http://www.draumrpublishing.com/
robert@draumrpublishing.com

Ok, I will do that sometime soon. Thank you.
I may have asked this already, but do you charge? Do you pay advances. What is your totay word count for submissions, and do you accept multiple submissions for let's say a trilogy, or two book series?

Sassenach
01-05-2006, 08:27 AM
Ok, I will do that sometime soon. Thank you.
I may have asked this already, but do you charge? Do you pay advances. What is your totay word count for submissions, and do you accept multiple submissions for let's say a trilogy, or two book series?

READ their website, where the info re word count is listed.

A trilogy or series wouldn't be a 'multiple' submission.

Draumr Robert
01-05-2006, 05:09 PM
Ok, I will do that sometime soon. Thank you.
I may have asked this already, but do you charge? Do you pay advances. What is your totay word count for submissions, and do you accept multiple submissions for let's say a trilogy, or two book series?


Bloemmarc-

I think you'll find all of these questions answered by our submission guidelines, located here:

https://www.draumrpublishing.com/submissions.php

And FAQS:

https://www.draumrpublishing.com/submissionFAQs.php

--Robert E. Allen III
Editor, Draumr Publishing
http://www.draumrpublishing.com/
robert@draumrpublishing.com

bloemmarc
01-05-2006, 09:04 PM
Bloemmarc-

I think you'll find all of these questions answered by our submission guidelines, located here:

https://www.draumrpublishing.com/submissions.php

And FAQS:

https://www.draumrpublishing.com/submissionFAQs.php

--Robert E. Allen III
Editor, Draumr Publishing
http://www.draumrpublishing.com/
robert@draumrpublishing.com

Thank you very much Mr. Allen. I actually did that last night, after I wrote those questions.

DaveKuzminski
01-05-2006, 09:46 PM
Why are your contracts private? You don't use a standard template that's negotiable when need be and can be shared?

Aconite
01-05-2006, 10:55 PM
4. Our contracts are private; but I'll try and answer specific questions you might have.
Mr. Allen, your company is, of course, free to do as it sees fit, but when a small press tells me its contract template is private, that publisher drops to the bottom of my submission list because I can't tell whether it's worth my time to submit to it at all. I have no way of knowing whether or not the contract in general is going to be acceptable to me, and without a sense of what's in the contract, I can't even tell what questions I need to ask about it. JMO.

Draumr Robert
01-05-2006, 10:58 PM
Why are your contracts private? You don't use a standard template that's negotiable when need be and can be shared?

Hello, Dave.

A fine question. In our personal good legal sense, it's best that contracts be private. Most of the terms are negotiable, but that's a private matter between us an our authors. While we don't feel comfortable with posting that sort of thing on the web, I will answer specific questions about what's on it. Or, you are more than welcome to contact one of our authors (all of them are available on our forum) and ask them if they feel the contract is fair.

Out of curiosity, are the contracts with the Harper Collins and Simon & Schusters of the world public? I'd be interested in seeing if they are posted on their websites somewhere.

--Robert E. Allen III
Editor, Draumr Publishing
http://www.draumrpublishing.com/
robert@draumrpublishing.com

Draumr Robert
01-05-2006, 11:12 PM
Mr. Allen, your company is, of course, free to do as it sees fit, but when a small press tells me its contract template is private, that publisher drops to the bottom of my submission list because I can't tell whether it's worth my time to submit to it at all. I have no way of knowing whether or not the contract in general is going to be acceptable to me, and without a sense of what's in the contract, I can't even tell what questions I need to ask about it. JMO.

Hello, Aconite.

I understand what you are saying, and thank you very much for your opinion. I do not think this a policy we will be changing, however. If you have prior issues with publishing contracts you have come across - things that you absolutely could not accept - I'd be interested in hearing what they are.

--Robert E. Allen III
Editor, Draumr Publishing
http://www.draumrpublishing.com/
robert@draumrpublishing.com

pepperlandgirl
01-05-2006, 11:16 PM
Well, PublishAmerica's contract springs to mind...

CaoPaux
01-05-2006, 11:35 PM
It could be argued that the "big boys" don't need to display their legalese, since we know what signing with them leads to: selling lots of books.

How does your contract differ from this skeletal one?
http://sfwa.org/contracts/pb_cont.htm

Aconite
01-05-2006, 11:35 PM
Well, PublishAmerica's contract springs to mind...
That's the kind of thing I'm thinking about--the stuff that comes out of left field, and you'd never think to ask about it because you'd never think it would be in a contract. Things like, "And furthermore, you swear to run our website for two years for no compensation and wash my dog once a month. Also, if you say anything bad about our company, we get to fine you $1,000,000,000 and flog you in public."

Sassenach
01-05-2006, 11:38 PM
I thinking we've two definitions of private here, with Mr Allen thinking he's being asked to reveal financial data [advances, etc.]

Aconite
01-05-2006, 11:41 PM
I thinking we've two definitions of private here, with Mr Allen thinking he's being asked to reveal financial data [advances, etc.]
No, templates were mentioned twice.

Aconite
01-05-2006, 11:45 PM
It could be argued that the "big boys" don't need to display their legalese, since we know what signing with them leads to: selling lots of books.
I know that the "big boy" contract templates are going to be industry standard, because agents and entertainment lawyers deal with them every day. I don't know that with most small presses.

Sassenach
01-05-2006, 11:57 PM
No, templates were mentioned twice.

But not by Allen.

DaveKuzminski
01-05-2006, 11:59 PM
Hiding a contract template makes me suspicious that there's something in it that writers don't want to find.

I'm already dealing with another publisher to get them to change their contract and it appears that they will because they don't want a continued negative recommendation from P&E. Of course, the first words to me in their email was to ask how I got hold of it. They got the standard answer that P&E doesn't reveal its sources.

Anyway, if Draumr's contract has something bad in it, then their management might want to view the model contract at either the SFWA or EPIC sites and consider switching. While no contract is perfect, those are models P&E recommends because there is considerable fairness in those for both publishers and writers.

Draumr Robert
01-06-2006, 12:02 AM
I thinking we've two definitions of private here, with Mr Allen thinking he's being asked to reveal financial data [advances, etc.]

I also think it's interesting that for some, the definition of private is "something to hide". Our contracts do talk about financial data - royalties.

We are a small publisher, and harbor no illusions about it. We play fair because we are writers (half of us, that is) and we have been treated unfairly before. But we're also private because that is how we chose to be treated ourselves.

CaoPaux, I will sit down and compare our contract to the SFWA and point out our differences. I'm afraid that is a bigger task that I have time for at this very moment, but I am not at all opposed to it.

--Robert E. Allen III
Editor, Draumr Publishing
http://www.draumrpublishing.com/
robert@draumrpublishing.com

James D. Macdonald
01-06-2006, 12:02 AM
There is no reason for anyone to display their standard contract.

DaveKuzminski
01-06-2006, 12:08 AM
There is no reason for anyone to display their standard contract.

While it is not required, in light of how many publishers, notably mostly recent ones, have contracts that have much in them to be concerned about in the way of hidden gotchas and the like, I think it is in the interests of legitimate publishers to post a sample of their standard contract with the proviso that some sections may change during negotiations if such actually ever take place or a statement to the fact that this is it, take it or leave it.

Draumr Robert
01-06-2006, 12:08 AM
That's the kind of thing I'm thinking about--the stuff that comes out of left field, and you'd never think to ask about it because you'd never think it would be in a contract. Things like, "And furthermore, you swear to run our website for two years for no compensation and wash my dog once a month. Also, if you say anything bad about our company, we get to fine you $1,000,000,000 and flog you in public."


I'm thinking we need to put something in about washing our dog. That'd be a really productive clause.

Um, how to put this diplomatically....how desperate and/or stupid would somehow have to be to sign such a document? I'd be ashamed to put anything like that in ours, and I suspect our lawyer would hit me.

--Robert E. Allen III
Editor, Draumr Publishing
http://www.draumrpublishing.com/
robert@draumrpublishing.com

Aconite
01-06-2006, 12:20 AM
[1] Um, how to put this diplomatically....how desperate and/or stupid would somehow have to be to sign such a document? [2] I'd be ashamed to put anything like that in ours, and I suspect our lawyer would hit me.
1) Very, and 2) I suspect so, too. But without knowing your press, I have no way of knowing what might be in your contract. Frex, that fine for speaking negatively about the company--I didn't make that up (though I exaggerated the amount). There are at least two publishers with such contract clauses.

James D. Macdonald
01-06-2006, 12:51 AM
Those of us who have been looking at this sort of thing for awhile recognize that some contracts (particularly with startups and web-based publishers) contain clauses that make you wish that they were just asking you to wash their dog.

Popeyesays
04-25-2006, 09:00 PM
I checked out P&E last night, and found Draumr Publishing with no good or bad notes attached. WHich means it is okay.

I will note that I sent a submission in the wee hours this morning and dropped the total word count from the submission. (How about that for stupid!). They were kind enough to prompt me rather than simply hit the <DELETE> key. That's gotta be a plus in anyone's book.

Regards,
Scott

MadScientistMatt
04-25-2006, 09:08 PM
I checked out P&E last night, and found Draumr Publishing with no good or bad notes attached. WHich means it is okay.

Well, actually, it means that Dave hasn't found any evidence that they are scammers, which is not quite the same thing.

Kiva Wolfe
12-28-2006, 04:40 PM
I am surprised that P&E has nothing whatsoever on Draumr Publishing, considering I sent them a positive email months ago relating to my experiences.

Armchair quarterbacking aside, when researching a publisher and negotiating the terms of your contract, it is essential to seek out authors who can provide tangible documentation--good or bad--about the company. All of Draumr's authors may be contacted by way of the publisher's chat forum. In my case, the response I received was very constructive.

czjaba
04-12-2007, 08:20 PM
Does anyone have any current knowledge/dealings with this publisher? I have looked at their website and still can't figure out if they are a POD or not.
I also noticed that in this thread, the question of advances came up a few times, but wasn't answered.
Also, does anyone understand about their marketing and promotional abilities? I mean, of the books they publish, do they sell well?
I am thinking of submitting to them, just trying to make sure they are a legit publisher that doesn't have hidden clauses in their contract.

Any thoughts? Does anyone know if they are a POD?

Aprylwriter
04-12-2007, 09:45 PM
Do you think this is her? The book is called "Great Love" and it is by a woman named Rida Allen, I found it on Publish America.

http://www.publishamerica.com/shopping/shopdisplayproducts.asp?Search=Yes

Popeyesays
04-12-2007, 10:11 PM
Does anyone have any current knowledge/dealings with this publisher? I have looked at their website and still can't figure out if they are a POD or not.
I also noticed that in this thread, the question of advances came up a few times, but wasn't answered.
Also, does anyone understand about their marketing and promotional abilities? I mean, of the books they publish, do they sell well?
I am thinking of submitting to them, just trying to make sure they are a legit publisher that doesn't have hidden clauses in their contract.

Any thoughts? Does anyone know if they are a POD?

Yes, they 'print on demand'. They also sell e-books. As best i can tell they have no distribution in place. Check their titles on-line and call some bookstores to be certain.

Regards,
Scott

Bushdoctor
11-16-2009, 04:46 PM
any updates on these guys?

M.R.J. Le Blanc
11-17-2009, 01:13 AM
Pass. No one working there appears to have the right experience, and if the "small publishing company in Frederick, Maryland, where they utilized the print-on-demand technology to offer new authors the chance to achieve their dreams." is who I think it is (*coughPublishAmericacouch*), that's even less of a good sign. A writer who didn't learn the difference between a real small publisher and a scam outfit like PA is the last person I'd want as my publisher.

Writing a book does not qualify you to be a publisher.

Bushdoctor
11-17-2009, 01:22 AM
i submited to them but on the strength of your argument mrj, i wont even bother now

James D. Macdonald
11-17-2009, 02:19 AM
i submited to them but on the strength of your argument mrj, i wont even bother now


Is your book a moderately-steamy romance featuring Big Beautiful Women (BBW)?

If not, these folks probably aren't your market anyway.

veinglory
11-17-2009, 02:50 AM
And if it is, there a plenty of other publishers interested in that sort of story.

Bushdoctor
11-17-2009, 03:15 AM
Is your book a moderately-steamy romance featuring Big Beautiful Women (BBW)?

If not, these folks probably aren't your market anyway.

No it's not. Uncle J, what would we do without you!

Unimportant
11-17-2009, 03:30 AM
No it's not. Uncle J, what would we do without you!

Um....look it up ourselves? James Macdonald is a wonderful font of information; however, it's advisable to check out a publisher's website yourself before submitting to them. Draumr clearly states: "Authors, we are currently focusing on romance novels of all sub-genres that feature BBW heroines."

Bushdoctor
11-17-2009, 07:13 PM
Um....look it up ourselves? James Macdonald is a wonderful font of information; however, it's advisable to check out a publisher's website yourself before submitting to them. Draumr clearly states: "Authors, we are currently focusing on romance novels of all sub-genres that feature BBW heroines."

that would be too easy

James D. Macdonald
11-17-2009, 08:23 PM
that would be too easy

Too easy for who?

Failure to read the guidelines is one reason why slushpiles are full of material that the press can't use. Slushkiller (http://nielsenhayden.com/makinglight/archives/004641.html) category two. It won't be bought, at least by that press, no matter how wonderful it is. But it still takes up room. It takes time to open the package. To log it in. To skim the first page. To insert a rejection slip, or hit the button to send the rejection email.

When I say that you should submit your work in strict compliance with the guidelines, I mean it. And when I say that you shouldn't consider any press until you've read two or three of their recent releases, I mean that too.

Bushdoctor
11-18-2009, 03:56 AM
Ah well. I heard back from them. I was rejected because of my geographical location. I had stated I live in Edinburgh but the lady from their submissions dept wrote:

"Unfortunately, we are unable to accept your submission due to your home location. At this time, we only accept submissions from residents of United States, United Kingdom, and Canada, as they are the areas where our print books are available for distribution and purchase."

The last time I checked Scotland was still part of the UK but clearly that doesnt cut it with them!

Sydewinder
11-18-2009, 05:58 PM
Ah well. I heard back from them. I was rejected because of my geographical location. I had stated I live in Edinburgh but the lady from their submissions dept wrote:

"Unfortunately, we are unable to accept your submission due to your home location. At this time, we only accept submissions from residents of United States, United Kingdom, and Canada, as they are the areas where our print books are available for distribution and purchase."

The last time I checked Scotland was still part of the UK but clearly that doesnt cut it with them!

that's strange. why would they care if they don't distribute to your home town/country. are they relying on your friends and family to purchase the bulk of books?

Unimportant
11-19-2009, 12:52 AM
Most publishers expect their authors to be available for promo stuff like book signings, and that would prove difficult if the author lived thousands of miles away from the nearest bookstore carrying the author's book.

Maybe the Draumr editor accidentally selected the wrong "auto reject" form and sent the "you're not from UK/North America" one instead of the "we don't publish books in the genre you sent us, next time plz to read the guidelines and not waste our time" one.

Terie
11-19-2009, 01:26 AM
Most publishers expect their authors to be available for promo stuff like book signings, and that would prove difficult if the author lived thousands of miles away from the nearest bookstore carrying the author's book.

Um, no, not really. My publisher knew I lived more than 3,000 miles and an ocean away from the nearest bookshop that would carry my books, and it didn't give them a second thought. If this were true, there would be very little in the way of foreign rights being sold.

Unimportant
11-19-2009, 01:29 AM
Good point, Teri. Perhaps it would be more applicable to "some small presses who expect their authors to do the majority of the promo".

Bushdoctor
11-19-2009, 02:46 AM
Maybe the Draumr editor accidentally selected the wrong "auto reject" form and sent the "you're not from UK/North America" one instead of the "we don't publish books in the genre you sent us, next time plz to read the guidelines and not waste our time" one.


I'd classify this as speculation

veinglory
11-19-2009, 02:47 AM
Its either that or they flunked geography.

Unimportant
11-19-2009, 02:58 AM
I'd classify this as speculation
Erm, yes, that's why I started the sentence with "maybe."

A lot of small presses only accept submissions from authors in certain geographical locations, for whatever reasons. Most presses, large and small, send form rejections, and some presses have multiple form rejections to choose from and send the most applicable one.

Since Bushdoctor lives in the UK and this press accepts UK authors, the possibilities are: (a) wrong form reject sent, or (b) editor unaware that Edinburgh is in Scotland and that Scotland is part of the UK, or (c)publisher only has one form reject and they send it off whether it's applicable or not. Option A seemed the most likely to me; YMMV.

Bushdoctor
11-19-2009, 03:05 AM
Erm, yes, that's why I started the sentence with "maybe."

A lot of small presses only accept submissions from authors in certain geographical locations, for whatever reasons. Most presses, large and small, send form rejections, and some presses have multiple form rejections to choose from and send the most applicable one.

Since Bushdoctor lives in the UK and this press accepts UK authors, the possibilities are: (a) wrong form reject sent, or (b) editor unaware that Edinburgh is in Scotland and that Scotland is part of the UK, or (c)publisher only has one form reject and they send it off whether it's applicable or not. Option A seemed the most likely to me; YMMV.

Geez only 3 options A-C. I sure as hell can think of more

eqb
11-19-2009, 03:07 AM
Geez only 3 options A-C. I sure as hell can think of more

Who cares why they rejected you?

No means no. Research more publishers and move on.

Bushdoctor
11-19-2009, 03:11 AM
Who cares why they rejected you?

No means no. Research more publishers and move on.

You should bother to read the rest of the thread. The issue stated was one of geographical location. It is just the case of a dumb American who does not know basic geography duh

eqb
11-19-2009, 03:15 AM
You should bother to read the rest of the thread. The issue stated was one of geographical location. It is just the case of a dumb American who does not know basic geography duh

I did read the whole thread before I posted. The answer was no. The reason doesn't matter. Move on.

Bushdoctor
11-19-2009, 03:18 AM
I did read the whole thread before I posted. The answer was no. The reason doesn't matter. Move on.

Like I said it was worth noting that the stated rationale was utterly flawed. if someone says no based on geographical location that means they havent even considered the work and would not consider it in any case because you fall outside of their catchment area. It's not rocket science pal

eqb
11-19-2009, 03:23 AM
Like I said it was worth noting that the stated rationale was utterly flawed. if someone says no based on geographical location that means they havent even considered the work and would not consider it in any case because you fall outside of their catchment area. It's not rocket science pal

Yes, we *all* got that the first time around. You noted the glitch. Possible reasons were explored by others. But in the end, no means no, and the reason given might be only (albeit mistaken) one of many. It's not worth fretting over.

Bushdoctor
11-19-2009, 03:27 AM
Yes, we *all* got that the first time around. You noted the glitch. Possible reasons were explored by others. But in the end, no means no, and the reason given might be only (albeit mistaken) one of many. It's not worth fretting over.

you know the one about talking to a wall?

eqb
11-19-2009, 03:31 AM
you know the one about talking to a wall?

No, but the discussion is going (has gone) way off topic from Draumr Publishing. If you still want to discuss walls or rejections with me, please take it to email. Otherwise, best of luck with future submissions.

James D. Macdonald
11-19-2009, 06:13 AM
Alas, rejectioncollection.com (http://web.archive.org/web/20080305194910/rejectioncollection.com/submit/) seems to have gone off the Web as of Spring '08. Too bad, or that would have been the perfect place for this.

Bushdoctor
11-19-2009, 01:32 PM
The moral of this story is, when you submit to Draumr be very explicit about where you live.

James D. Macdonald
11-19-2009, 01:33 PM
Explain to me again why you were submitting to Draumr in the first place?

Bushdoctor
11-19-2009, 01:42 PM
Explain to me again why you were submitting to Draumr in the first place?

I have Action/Romance novel Uncle J. It's not bbw but I gave them a shot because on their general submissions page they state:

"We are currently seeking submissions for Draumr Publishing fiction genres such as science fiction, fantasy, horror, mystery, adventure, suspense/thriller, non-bbw romances (including all the subgenres listed above), and gay/lesbian stories"

Bushdoctor
11-19-2009, 09:48 PM
I apologize for the miscommunication. You should receive a confirmation email shortly.

Submissions Department
Draumr Publishing, LLC
http://www.draumrpublishing.com (http://www.draumrpublishing.com)
"

This is the latest email I recieved, confirming there was an error in the first email. That's all I have been trying to say all along. I am sure if it was a R they would have said so, but what I had recieved was an email which basically stated that I had been screened out not based on the merit of the work. How that translated to a proper rejection so some people is beyond me.

veinglory
11-19-2009, 11:12 PM
You got some speculative suggestions about what might have happened. Why you took that as an insult is beyond me.

Bushdoctor
11-20-2009, 02:37 AM
You got some speculative suggestions about what might have happened. Why you took that as an insult is beyond me.

I dont know if insulted is the right term. I was merely correcting what were blatently flawed analysis

Unimportant
11-20-2009, 10:20 AM
My analysis, which you took objection to, was that they sent the wrong form reply. Which has proved to be the case. So why are you still bleating on about it?

Bushdoctor
11-20-2009, 08:06 PM
My analysis, which you took objection to, was that they sent the wrong form reply. Which has proved to be the case. So why are you still bleating on about it?

I rest my case

IceCreamEmpress
11-20-2009, 09:22 PM
My analysis, which you took objection to, was that they sent the wrong form reply. Which has proved to be the case. So why are you still bleating on about it?

This whole thing is bizarre. Bushdoctor sent the wrong genre of manuscript to a publisher, who then sent back the wrong kind of rejection email--how did this minor mixup become a kerfuffle on this thread?

CaoPaux
11-20-2009, 09:42 PM
I'm in no mood to speculate, but it will stop now.

Closing for the weekend.

Stephen B. Pearl
11-22-2011, 04:44 AM
Hi all,

Iím an author who is published by Draumr. Stephen B. Pearl with the novel Tinkerís Plague, a post-apocalyptic, science fiction, action adventure. My female lead is slender and classically pretty, the book is defiantly SF, and overall Iím very happy with how Iíve been treated. By the by, no one put me up to this. I saw the discussion and thought Iíd give my first had experience.

Publishers reject books for all kinds of reasons. Often I think it can be a frivolous as, ďIím having a bad day, so Iím going to clear my desk and knock off early.Ē Tinkerís Plague was rejected by a load of publishers before I found Draumr. The trick is not to take it as sour grapes and just keep plugging.

Rida and Robert have been consistently decent with me and very prompt in getting me copies to sell at cons and the like. It did take them a while to get me into the Chapters, Indigo, Coles chain of stores, but they managed it. The contract is fairly standard, and yes I have read about a half dozen sample contracts from various publishers. The Draumr contract is about on par with my two other publishers, Club Lighthouse Publishing and Dark Dragon Publishing. No great leaps ahead or back from either of these.

I will say this. If people are so concerned, Iím surprised I havenít received any e-mails asking about my experience with them. Iím not hard to find.
So thatís my first hand experience.

Stephen B. Pearl.

LindaJeanne
11-22-2011, 05:34 AM
Publishers reject books for all kinds of reasons.

(BTW, the past couple of pages where one person was complaining about his rejection letter -- while others were saying, it's just a rejection, move on -- were from two years ago. And the profile of the person complaining indicates that he hasn't logged onto AW in a year and a half.)

The rest of the thread is from even farther back.:cool:

Regardless, I'm glad your experiences have been positive. :)

CaoPaux
11-14-2013, 10:37 PM
Per homepage:
Thank you for your patronage over the ten years we were in business. Unfortunately, we have decided to close our virtual doors as of September 12, 2013.