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Will Lavender
08-29-2007, 03:08 AM
What are your favorite novels about writers and writing?

I liked Wake Up, Sir! by Jonathan Ames, and All is Vanity by Christina Schwarz. There are also three or four Stephen King titles you could pick (The Dark Half would probably be mine).

Any that you enjoy?

scarletpeaches
08-29-2007, 03:29 AM
I've read All is Vanity but not Drowning Ruth (yet...I have my own copy).

I've also read Bag of Bones...was that about a writer? See how much of an impression it made on me!

Oh, and Dean Koontz's Lightning. Time travel and writing!

Will Lavender
08-29-2007, 03:34 AM
Oy, I forgot The World According to Garp!

Put that at #1-Infinity. Fantastic novel.

johnnysannie
08-29-2007, 03:51 AM
Bag of Bones, Stephen King
The Shining, Stephen King
Youngblood Hawke, Herman Wouk
Some Came Running, James Jones

Andrew Greeley's Nuala Ann novels, Irish Eyes, Irish Mist, Irish Whiskey, etc. in which MC (and narrator) Dermot Coyne is a writer

The Diviners, Margaret Lawrence

Those are some of my favs but there are more....many, many more....

Saanen
08-29-2007, 10:20 PM
I love Death Rat! by Michael J. Nelson. The MC is a niche NF writer whose publisher boots him; he ends up writing a thriller, which (due to various complications) becomes a sensation because it's marketed as NF. It's a very funny book!

ModoReese
08-29-2007, 10:41 PM
I'll say Misery, just cuz no one else has. :)

Michelle

Claudia Gray
08-29-2007, 11:52 PM
The number-one favorite would have to be Possession by A.S. Byatt.

Robin Bayne
08-30-2007, 12:03 AM
"The Novelist" by Angela Hunt.

Susan Breen
08-30-2007, 12:03 AM
My book is about a writer and, if I could take a moment for self-promotion, The Fiction Class is coming out on Feb. 26. I always stayed away from writing about writers because it seemed like cheating, but then, after spending seven years working on a novel about a pianist, (and spending seven years taking piano lessons), I figured the heck with it. I might as well write about something I know.

Priene
08-30-2007, 12:12 AM
Doctor Zhivago. And then Pasternak was forced to turn down the Nobel Prize for Literature.

NemoBook
08-30-2007, 03:48 AM
I'm reading "Truth & Beauty" by Ann Patchett right now. It is both true and also beautiful.

JoNightshade
08-30-2007, 03:57 AM
Ray Bradbury's mysteries have a writer as the MC.

Shady Lane
08-30-2007, 04:18 AM
The Year of Endless Sorrows by Adam Rapp.

It's not as depressing as it sounds. But it's...kinda close.

Harper K
08-30-2007, 04:43 AM
I like John Updike's books about the mostly frustrated, mostly unproductive novelist Henry Bech: Bech: A Book, Bech is Back, and Bech at Bay.

rosebud1981
08-30-2007, 04:57 AM
The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon.

It's a thriller about two writers and is one of the best books I've ever read

lkp
08-30-2007, 05:44 AM
The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon.

It's a thriller about two writers and is one of the best books I've ever read


Ditto. Loved, loved that book. I expect to reread it many times.
Right now I am rereading another favourite, Doris Lessing's The Golden Notebook, a novel essentially about writing and writer's block.

Will Lavender
08-30-2007, 06:43 AM
The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon.

It's a thriller about two writers and is one of the best books I've ever read

For some reason, I picked this book up many times but passed on it. But I think I'm going to try it in the next week or so. Right up my alley; sounds, in a lot of ways, like my book.

Noticed that Publishers Weekly was very harsh on it, which is odd because PW is pretty tame most of the time. Their review on Amazon cuts really sharply against the grain of the user comments -- which are overwhelmingly positive.

Just something weird I noticed.

gerrydodge
09-05-2007, 07:06 PM
I love the Bech series by Updike and I agree with Will Lavender that THE WORLD ACCORDING TO GARP is at the top of the list.

Will Lavender
09-05-2007, 07:27 PM
Just picked up Martha Grimes' Foul Matter, a crime novel set in the world of publishing. Pretty good so far, although I'm not a huge Grimes fan. (I really like her writing style, but she is far more interested in quipping and clever puns than she is in, you know, suspense. Her Richard Jury novels The Old Wine Shades, the last one I read, was interesting but strangely...flat. Grimes tends to just move quickly through the suspensful, scary scenes but linger on the scenes where Jury is drinking with his pals.] don't do anything for me at all. Hopefully this one will be a bit more up my alley.)

EriRae
09-06-2007, 11:26 AM
Another John Irving about writers: A Widow for One Year. King's short story Secret Window, at least, that was the movie title. Michael Chabon's Wonder Boys, and to an extent, Kavalier and Clay, since Sammy Clay was also a pulp novelist.

Azraelsbane
09-06-2007, 11:47 AM
Already listed, but mine is 100% The Dark Half by Stephen King

Marian Perera
09-06-2007, 02:01 PM
No one mentioned Misery? That's one of my favorite King novels.

Will Lavender
09-06-2007, 05:36 PM
Another John Irving about writers: A Widow for One Year. King's short story Secret Window, at least, that was the movie title. Michael Chabon's Wonder Boys, and to an extent, Kavalier and Clay, since Sammy Clay was also a pulp novelist.

Forgot Wonder Boys! Tremendous novel. I think what made it so interesting was that it felt like an exercise. It was...loose, for lack of a better word. It just felt like Chabon was playfully experimenting -- which he was, as he had come off a failed five-year attempt at writing a behemoth of a "serious" novel.

WB is Chabon's thinnest book, and it might be his best.

aruna
09-06-2007, 07:05 PM
Well, I haven't read the book, but Stephen King's Misery...

Martin Amis The Information - I also haven't read it.

The Other Side of the Story - a chick-lit novel by whatshername.

gerrydodge
09-06-2007, 07:24 PM
Crap, I forgot THE GHOST WRITER by Philip Roth. Roth gets swept under the rug it seems--even by me even though I really like his writing.

Laurie Champion
09-08-2007, 10:11 AM
Jonathon Tropper's THE BOOK OF JOE and his new novel, the narrator is a writer, HOW TO TALK TO A WIDOWER, both excellent books.

Deirdre
09-08-2007, 10:27 AM
Steve Martini's The List.

From the Amazon description: "In a change of venue from his courtroom settings, Martini embeds his latest mystery in the cynical world of blockbuster-book publishing. The premise: Abby Chandlis discovers that literary agents, hitherto bored by her thriller, perk up when she hides her authorship and attributes it to a male writer. Apparently nothing sells better than a first novel from a hunk with face-by-Fabio. She must tell somebody about her scam, if only to protect her contracts and copyrights[...]"

Hilarity ensues.

Snowberry
09-12-2007, 08:32 PM
"Bestseller" by Olivia Goldsmith - cynical look at the publishing world. And "What a Carve Up" by Jonathan Coe, about a writer trying to write a biography of a corrupt family.

rosebud1981
09-13-2007, 04:17 PM
Keep the Aspidistra Flying by George Orwell - A struggling and poor poet does not want to compromise his principles and take a "good job" that he hates. Excellent book.

ATP
09-13-2007, 05:47 PM
I am fulsome in my praise for what I think is perhaps one of the best books written per se: The Master and Margarita, by Mikhail Bulgakov. Originally written in Russian in 1938, and translated to English sometime after (!).
The MC is a struggling writer; the Russian soul and mentality permeate the book. Simply a grand, wonderful, wonderful story.

Thump
09-13-2007, 05:52 PM
Well, not one I especially love but interesting nonetheless: The Lesson of the Master, by Henry James. A young, talented writers gets to meet his idol (another writer) who is not quite as nice a fellow as he pretends to be.

Priene
09-13-2007, 06:37 PM
I am fulsome in my praise for what I think is perhaps one of the best books written per se: The Master and Margarita, by Mikhail Bulgakov. Originally written in Russian in 1938, and translated to English sometime after (!).
The MC is a struggling writer; the Russian soul and mentality permeate the book. Simply a grand, wonderful, wonderful story.

This is the second time I've seen Bulgakov highly recommended, and I shall be adding him to my book stack.

Will Lavender
09-15-2007, 09:59 PM
And "What a Carve Up" by Jonathan Coe, about a writer trying to write a biography of a corrupt family.

Ah yes. Coe's sort of an unrecognized master, at least here in the States. (Rupert Thompson is another. His The Book of Revelation is one of the fiercest, most brilliant things I've ever read.)

Coe's novel is called The Winshaw Legacy in the US, by the way.

Jamesaritchie
09-15-2007, 10:38 PM
I like most already mentioned, but one of my favorites is As Good As it Gets.

Billingsgate
09-18-2007, 10:27 AM
Someone mentioned The Ghost Writer by Philip Roth. All of his Zuckerman novels together are the greatest books about a writer. His writing rings very true. I enjoyed Stephen King's Misery, but that's a dark fantasy, while Roth's are dark reality.

JJ Cooper
09-18-2007, 01:32 PM
Just started The Secret Life of E. Robert Pendelton by Michael Collins.

JJ

P.H.Delarran
10-12-2007, 09:43 AM
I just finished The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield. It's about two authors, one is a biographer writing the story of a very famous author of the time. It's a very good story.

gingerwoman
10-13-2007, 04:53 AM
Wow surprisingly I don't think I've read many.
Was Paul Morel in Son's and Lovers a writer? I remember loving that book but can't recall.
Misery has a lot to say about the nature of being a writer. It's quite intellectual and I read it at the same time I read On Writing which made his messages even more powerful.

larocca
10-13-2007, 05:03 AM
The World According to Garp - John Irving
The Shining - Stephen King

And even though it's a movie and not a book, Finding Forrester.

"Did you ever read your work in public?"
"Hell no, I barely read it in private."

gingerwoman
10-13-2007, 08:02 AM
Oooh I loved The World According to Garp.