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Legionsynch
08-25-2007, 05:45 PM
Random musings this morning brought up something I thought might benefit another little discussion over here. ;)

We all know the publishing industry is all gung ho on "what's hot" right now. This is hot, that is not, etc. But what are the things that you, as a YA writer and reader, don't see out there that you wish you did?

For me, I think I'd like to see a paranormal/urban fantasy romance (in the veins of Twilight) but with a gay or lesbian couple. Oh the pressures of high school, and burgeoning love, and oppression from parents. Oh yeah, and there's that pesky supernatural element. ;)

More urban fantasy where the beasties and things are not known about to most people. Where the world hasn't responded with the creation of some agency or bureau to handle their affairs. Alternately, where there's not a ton of century old groups that know "the truth" in shades of the Illuminati, the Skulls, or other councils.

Legionsynch
08-25-2007, 05:46 PM
Oh, and my favorite cliche. "I didn't think there'd be so much blood." I've seen it dozens of times lately, in books and movies. Just for once, I'd love to see someone say "Huh. I'd have thought there'd be more blood" while hyperventilating about the scene in front of them.

Danger Jane
08-25-2007, 07:40 PM
More mythology!!

But not until my WIP comes out and makes it a craze.

No not a craze. But hot.

Hapax Legomenon
08-25-2007, 07:44 PM
Oh, and my favorite cliche. "I didn't think there'd be so much blood." I've seen it dozens of times lately, in books and movies. Just for once, I'd love to see someone say "Huh. I'd have thought there'd be more blood" while hyperventilating about the scene in front of them.

Kind of reminds me about what I'm drawing in a webcomic now -- the MC is hemophobic, and while the rest of the world is going to have an unrealistically high gore level, he's going to respond realistically. None of this "I didn't think there'd be so much blood" and then throwing up. And none of this sudden desensitation stuff. He's going to have to work for it, damn it.

Sage
08-25-2007, 08:33 PM
Oh, and my favorite cliche. "I didn't think there'd be so much blood." I've seen it dozens of times lately, in books and movies. Just for once, I'd love to see someone say "Huh. I'd have thought there'd be more blood" while hyperventilating about the scene in front of them.
I almost do this. It's really the MC rationalizing why there isn't as much blood as the reader might expect considering the violence of the crime, while her brother throws up in the corner. That's not YA though.... I should prolly forget about AFTRLYF while in here ("bad Sage").

I'm w/ Legionsynch about the gay/lesbian characters, but I do think that's almost expected these days, especially if it's YA set in a high school. But what I'd like to see is where the novel is not about their sexuality, nor are they there to be the "token homosexual character." Just that they're gay & their friends know that info, so they don't make a big deal about it, but respond to it with the same sort of attitude as they would respond to them being heterosexual or, say, blond.

Hapax Legomenon
08-25-2007, 08:50 PM
I really wish for urban fantasy where "OMFG LUUUV" is less of a big deal and more of a big deal is deciding between this fantasyland stuff and an education. For some reason school romance and drama still keep the front in urban fantasy, while very, very normal things like "if I skip school I'll get suspension" seem to completely slip their minds, or wander to the background.

For this reason, I find it impossible to relate to the main characters of YA urban fantasy.

Sage
08-25-2007, 09:04 PM
I really wish for urban fantasy where "OMFG LUUUV" is less of a big deal and more of a big deal is deciding between this fantasyland stuff and an education. For some reason school romance and drama still keep the front in urban fantasy, while very, very normal things like "if I skip school I'll get suspension" seem to completely slip their minds, or wander to the background.

For this reason, I find it impossible to relate to the main characters of YA urban fantasy.
Yes, totally agree. One of the things that worked about Buffy, the Vampire Slayer, for example, was that she did have to balance her duties as the Slayer with her life as a school girl. She always (well, for the first three seasons) had to worry that if she skipped school or didn't have time to study or ticked off the principal, she'd get suspended or expelled. And considering the show's popularity, you would think more YA urban fantasy would have followed suit.

JLCwrites
08-25-2007, 09:16 PM
Westerns! More teen MCs with lassos and boots!
Yee Haw!

http://a60.g.akamai.net/f/60/7267/1d/sheplers.download.akamai.com/7267/i/rotate/096/096570r47_000.jpg

Shady Lane
08-25-2007, 10:15 PM
Kind of reminds me about what I'm drawing in a webcomic now -- the MC is hemophobic, and while the rest of the world is going to have an unrealistically high gore level, he's going to respond realistically. None of this "I didn't think there'd be so much blood" and then throwing up. And none of this sudden desensitation stuff. He's going to have to work for it, damn it.

My MC in Sublime is a hemophiliac. Keep him away, haha.

You know what...I don't even know. Most of what I like is already out there.

I like books about heroin. Books about eating disorders. Books about religion. Books about fighting. Books about brothers. I know I know I know--there are TONS of these books out there (and I've read most of them.) But I can never get enough.

Esopha
08-25-2007, 10:25 PM
Now that I've had time to think about it, I'd like to see books about multicultural and multiethnic families without all the god damn angst.

I'm multiethnic. I angsted for about two months in elementary school and then I got over it. Please stop making us halfies sound like a bunch of whiny puss-pants.

Thank you.

reenkam
08-25-2007, 10:26 PM
For me, I think I'd like to see a paranormal/urban fantasy romance (in the veins of Twilight) but with a gay or lesbian couple. Oh the pressures of high school, and burgeoning love, and oppression from parents. Oh yeah, and there's that pesky supernatural element. ;)

Wow, I totally wrote something like this. It's a guy at boarding school, weird stuff starts happening, there's another guy, there's some love, there's some supernatural violence, there's self-sacrifice. Probably my favorite book I've written...

I was actually thinking about rewriting the whole thing and removing the gay angle cause I thought no one would read it...but maybe I should revise, edit, and query??


Books about religion. I know I know I know--there are TONS of these books out there (and I've read most of them.) But I can never get enough.

Can you recommend some about religion...I feel like I'd like that and I don't think I've read any before.

Claudia Gray
08-25-2007, 10:33 PM
I really wish for urban fantasy where "OMFG LUUUV" is less of a big deal and more of a big deal is deciding between this fantasyland stuff and an education. For some reason school romance and drama still keep the front in urban fantasy, while very, very normal things like "if I skip school I'll get suspension" seem to completely slip their minds, or wander to the background.

For this reason, I find it impossible to relate to the main characters of YA urban fantasy.

True -- but to be fair, how many genre novels in any genre have characters conveniently not needing to be at work while they're caught up in a murder investigation/making contact with aliens/being swept off their feet by a South American cattle baron/whatever?

I agree it's a problem, but I really don't think that problem is unique to YA urban fantasy.

Legionsynch
08-25-2007, 10:40 PM
How about more logic in urban fantasy. There's cute moments when the 5 million year old vampire falls in love with the 17 year old girl, but a lot of times that just seems...illogical. It's not just the romance thing, but the horror movie cliche. Why run up the stairs when the killer's in the house?

Let's see more smart, but not too smart (because that gets annoying too) kids. Street smart. When the bad stuff comes, they react less like they're the character in a book, and more like a teenager raised on Buffy and horror movies would know to act.

OverTheHills&FarAway
08-25-2007, 10:48 PM
Hmm....

More YA historicals. They're my absolute all-time favorite. Growing up in a different era and having to deal with different things, and yet, having to deal with the same things we do now. Love it. Guess that's why I was so totally into the Dear America books when I was a wee lass.

I don't know. Less about school, I guess. I know when you're a teenager school is pretty much the biggest thing in your life, and everyone goes through it so everyone can relate to it, but, I get tired of it. There's only so many books I can read about cliques and crushes on a guy way out of your league and pranks and teachers with grudges trying to ruin your life. Some is okay (cuz yeah, everyone goes to school and it's a reality) but I'd like to see some YA focusing on other aspects of teen life. (But those might be... I don't know. That's up to you to decide, oh exalted writers of YA)


And yeah, westerns! I LOVE westerns! But maybe because I'm writing one right now. A western/modern/brothers story/comic book/prison camp/worldwide marketing conspiracy/survival kind of story.

Yeah. Let's see some more of those.

But wait 'til I get finished with mine first, please! (I'm with Danger Jane. I want to start the craze on this fantastic oh-so-catchy unexplored niche, thank you very much.)

And ancient Greece. With gods. I love that.

Legionsynch
08-25-2007, 11:42 PM
I really wish for urban fantasy where "OMFG LUUUV" is less of a big deal and more of a big deal is deciding between this fantasyland stuff and an education. For some reason school romance and drama still keep the front in urban fantasy, while very, very normal things like "if I skip school I'll get suspension" seem to completely slip their minds, or wander to the background.

For this reason, I find it impossible to relate to the main characters of YA urban fantasy.

My current WIP revolves around a kid that actually enjoys going to school. So getting into it, I know that a lot of my drama's going to involve him refusing to not skip school, and not skip his homework so he can go out and party and all that.

But for the most part, I don't know many teenagers that are all gung ho about going to school in the first place. If something crazy started happening to them, they'd be more than happy to drop school like a bad habit.

Until Mom and Dad find out, of course. ;)

Lady Esther
08-26-2007, 12:02 AM
Now that I've had time to think about it, I'd like to see books about multicultural and multiethnic families without all the god damn angst.

I'm multiethnic. I angsted for about two months in elementary school and then I got over it. Please stop making us halfies sound like a bunch of whiny puss-pants.

Thank you.
I find this interesting because I'm writing about a Caucasian/African-American girl in my second WIP. I sure hope she doesn't sound whiny. lol. But, seriously, I want to avoid the stereotypes as much as possible, which is what authors writing about different races tend to worry about.

JLCwrites
08-26-2007, 12:21 AM
My current WIP revolves around a kid that actually enjoys going to school. So getting into it, I know that a lot of my drama's going to involve him refusing to not skip school, and not skip his homework so he can go out and party and all that.

But for the most part, I don't know many teenagers that are all gung ho about going to school in the first place. If something crazy started happening to them, they'd be more than happy to drop school like a bad habit.

Until Mom and Dad find out, of course. ;)

That sounds very interesting! Does your MC have a troubled home life and school is his sanctuary?

Hapax Legomenon
08-26-2007, 12:25 AM
My current WIP revolves around a kid that actually enjoys going to school. So getting into it, I know that a lot of my drama's going to involve him refusing to not skip school, and not skip his homework so he can go out and party and all that.

But for the most part, I don't know many teenagers that are all gung ho about going to school in the first place. If something crazy started happening to them, they'd be more than happy to drop school like a bad habit.

Until Mom and Dad find out, of course. ;)

I don't know too many teenagers who are gung-ho about going to school either. In fact, I hate school. I hate it with a burning passion. But do you know why I go?

Because I have a future, or at least I'd like to believe I do. I'm working towards grades, college, and eventually a career that I'll actually enjoy rather than being stuck doing something that I'll hate myself for the rest of my life for doing. I am absolutely determined to do this, so that is why I go to school, not because I enjoy it.

And I see very few YA protagonists that think this way, which frankly disturbs me. Everyone is either a slacker that hates school and wouldn't think twice about skipping, or an uber-nerd that loves school and hates the very idea.The vast majority of students don't fall into either of those categories, especially those who are college-bound.

As a Freshman, I was sick for two months, but I went to school anyway, but only skipped maybe three or four days. That still took a HUGE chunk out of my grades because it took an eternity to catch up. The way most advanced classes are set up pound you into the ground if you miss ONE DAY, and Lord have mercy on your soul if that day happened to be a test day. I spent weeks making up the work and I honestly believe that's why I got a B+ on my final project, even though it was months before I presented, no matter how much advocates tell me that it was because the teachers didn't understand what satire was (though that may be a part of it).

I hate school, I'm not going to lie. It's much more work than it's worth, but if I was wrapped up in some paranormal things, I wouldn't skip school without a tough fight of principle.

[/rant]

Legionsynch
08-26-2007, 12:29 AM
In theory. Essentially, it's an urban fantasy. He's raised by his uncle, and sent to some of most prestigious private schools in the country. But after awhile, in his own words "you get sick of going to a school where everyone thinks they're the most important student ever admitted, and you want to go to a school where everyone thinks they're ordinary."

So stuff happens, and he runs away. He hitchhikes and walks his way towards this town he knows his uncle was from, hoping to figure out what's going on in his life. Along the way, he uses his magic to charm people into letting him tour the local high schools for a day, suggesting he's transferring there soon. A normal school is kindof a refuge for him, because it suggests he can have an ordinary life, which is something that draws him in. And thus, his obsession with going to school.

Esopha
08-26-2007, 12:31 AM
I find this interesting because I'm writing about a Caucasian/African-American girl in my second WIP. I sure hope she doesn't sound whiny. lol. But, seriously, I want to avoid the stereotypes as much as possible, which is what authors writing about different races tend to worry about.

Eh...there can be some angst about her skin color, because I'm conscious of it as well. It's only this year that I've seen 'multiracial' on a standardized form. I never used to fill in the race/ethnicity information on school booklets, either, and none of the teachers pushed me to it.

Also, tons of people ask if I was adopted. Usually it's on the street, when I'm with my dad. It's annoying. I don't go on an angry tirade, I just say, "No, I wasn't. My mom's asian." They usually give me a look.

I can give you some more fun tidbits if you like. Some of them are headdesk inducing. :)

JLCwrites
08-26-2007, 12:38 AM
Haphazard,
I can remember being in high school and counting the days before I could leave. I think you are right. And I seriously hope you will enjoy college! I found it to be more fun, especially once I got all the GE classes finished and could focus on what I loved.. English.

It would be interesting if you could find a way to represent the majority of HS students by coming up with a story where your MC experiences the challenges outside of school (peers, parents or paranormal) overcomes it, and still graduates.

scarletpeaches
08-26-2007, 12:46 AM
Oh, and my favorite cliche. "I didn't think there'd be so much blood." I've seen it dozens of times lately, in books and movies. Just for once, I'd love to see someone say "Huh. I'd have thought there'd be more blood" while hyperventilating about the scene in front of them.

There's actually a scene in my WIP where that line would work perfectly. Mind if I use it?

Lady Esther
08-26-2007, 12:48 AM
Eh...there can be some angst about her skin color, because I'm conscious of it as well. It's only this year that I've seen 'multiracial' on a standardized form. I never used to fill in the race/ethnicity information on school booklets, either, and none of the teachers pushed me to it.

Also, tons of people ask if I was adopted. Usually it's on the street, when I'm with my dad. It's annoying. I don't go on an angry tirade, I just say, "No, I wasn't. My mom's asian." They usually give me a look.

I can give you some more fun tidbits if you like. Some of them are headdesk inducing. :)
Ok, thanks. :) My sister's baby girl is African-American, Mexican, and Native-American and people ALWAYS ask my sister what ethnicity her child is, but when the child is with her Mexican father, people assume she's just Mexican. Do people frequently ask you about your ethnicity? Maybe we should PM.

Esopha
08-26-2007, 12:53 AM
Ok, thanks. :) My sister's baby girl is African-American, Mexican, and Native-American and people ALWAYS ask my sister what ethnicity her child is, but when the child is with her Mexican father, people assume she's just Mexican. Do people frequently ask you about your ethnicity? Maybe we should PM.

I don't care either way.

I look very asian, so people don't ask. My friends enjoy grabbing 'new people' and bringing them over to me. Then the ask them what ethnicity they think I am. None of them ever guess that I'm multiracial. :D

My mom's friend, who married an asian man, was actually stopped on the street. The woman who stopped her said, "That's not your baby, is it?" like it was some kind of crime... She just said, "It is my baby, good-bye," and removed herself from the situation.

That's what I find is the best thing to do. Just walk away, because if they don't get that it's possible for two people of different skin colors to get married, they're not going to understand no matter how slowly you speak. ;)

roskoebaby
08-26-2007, 12:55 AM
I like to read about boyfriend/girlfriend relationships that are mature. Something that is more than hooking up. It can give teens something to dream about that's more than the crap that's on MTV's NEXT. It may not be realistic, but what dreams are?

bethany
08-26-2007, 12:58 AM
Gosh, my Amazon cart is overflowing, so I don't know what I most want to see. (except enough money to buy all those books)

Maybe something really dark and gritty for the sake of the story, not just to shock people or sell books.

Hapax Legomenon
08-26-2007, 01:04 AM
Haphazard,
I can remember being in high school and counting the days before I could leave. I think you are right. And I seriously hope you will enjoy college! I found it to be more fun, especially once I got all the GE classes finished and could focus on what I loved.. English.

It would be interesting if you could find a way to represent the majority of HS students by coming up with a story where your MC experiences the challenges outside of school (peers, parents or paranormal) overcomes it, and still graduates.

I was hoping that at the end of HP#7, Harry had skipped the last year of graduation, so even though he saved England, he'd end up being the Groundskeeper of Hogwarts.

I, IRL, have never put much into relationships. Sure, I talk to people, but they've never been a big deal or have caused nearly as much drama as in any sort of fiction. All of my drama, if there has been any, has been from deadlines. I've never read a realistic fiction story structured like this, to my dismay, and I have a feeling that most of the time it wouldn't make for a very exciting story. This is why I write fantasy.

In my current WIP, my MC has pretty much had his motivation and drive destroyed from the inside out. When -- if -- he ever gets it back, he'd be appalled by what losing it has done to his life. Currently, he's a total mess.

Shady Lane
08-26-2007, 01:22 AM
Wow, I totally wrote something like this. It's a guy at boarding school, weird stuff starts happening, there's another guy, there's some love, there's some supernatural violence, there's self-sacrifice. Probably my favorite book I've written...

I was actually thinking about rewriting the whole thing and removing the gay angle cause I thought no one would read it...but maybe I should revise, edit, and query??



Can you recommend some about religion...I feel like I'd like that and I don't think I've read any before.

A Prayer for Owen Meaney. Okay. It's not YA. But it's probably the best book I've ever read. And John Irving is a saint. I went to one of his readings and he was so sweet and so funny and I'm soooooo in love with him.

Um....beyond that I'm kinda drawing a blank, honestly. maybe I'll be really lucky and get Christmastime published and that one's about religion, yep.

My sister's gay and devours GLBT novels...and I love 'em too, man. Don't take it out. That's HOT now.

Btw: YA boards are becoming THE hot place to be. Don't deny it.

reenkam
08-26-2007, 01:33 AM
A Prayer for Owen Meaney. Okay. It's not YA. But it's probably the best book I've ever read. And John Irving is a saint. I went to one of his readings and he was so sweet and so funny and I'm soooooo in love with him.

Um....beyond that I'm kinda drawing a blank, honestly. maybe I'll be really lucky and get Christmastime published and that one's about religion, yep.

My sister's gay and devours GLBT novels...and I love 'em too, man. Don't take it out. That's HOT now.

Btw: YA boards are becoming THE hot place to be. Don't deny it.

I'll definitely check that book out. Thanks!

And maybe I'll get back to that book, too...actually, I'll make a post about it...lol


And the YA boards have always been the hot place. It's like Paris...or London...

Provrb1810meggy
08-26-2007, 01:48 AM
Man, I want to make a significant contribution to this thread, because duh, this board is the place to be. I just don't have anything to say.

Let's see....I like contemporary, funny YA with a conversational voice. I like things that take place in schools. I like friendships. I like romances. There's not really a shortage of these types of books.

And yet I am horribly picky when it comes to books, because hello, it's my money and I want to get something I like! I always read the first few pages. Sometimes I put things down after the first sentence. Sometimes I will enjoy reading the first few pages, but just can't buy it. A book needs that..."it" quality.

So more books with the "it" quality, that's what we need! And since the "it" quality is not the same for everyone, getting more books with my personal "it" quality would be impossible, thus my contribution to this thread is still insignificant.

I'm going to go sigh now.

Harper K
08-26-2007, 02:21 AM
I definitely want to see more historical YA. 20th century historical would be great -- and I don't mean those books that are conveniently set in the 80s because that's when the author was a teenager. Rather, I'd love to see something set in the 20s or 30s, but not have it be an "issue book" about Prohibition or the Depression or anything like that. Just, you know, a good story.

My biggest wish is to see more literary / experimental stuff in the YA section. Different types of narration, a narrative that jumps around in time, a story told backwards... something like that. And it wouldn't have to be a super serious book either. I think it'd be fun -- and potentially very humorous -- to have a contemporary YA or chick-lit story told in a more avant-garde style. Like, 20 different narrators telling the same story from different points in time, and the reader has to put it all together. It'd require a very strong writer to pull this off, and I'm sure some people would think reading something like this was a form of torture, but for the right reader (ME!), it'd be great fun.

JLCwrites
08-26-2007, 04:18 AM
In theory. Essentially, it's an urban fantasy. He's raised by his uncle, and sent to some of most prestigious private schools in the country. But after awhile, in his own words "you get sick of going to a school where everyone thinks they're the most important student ever admitted, and you want to go to a school where everyone thinks they're ordinary."

So stuff happens, and he runs away. He hitchhikes and walks his way towards this town he knows his uncle was from, hoping to figure out what's going on in his life. Along the way, he uses his magic to charm people into letting him tour the local high schools for a day, suggesting he's transferring there soon. A normal school is kindof a refuge for him, because it suggests he can have an ordinary life, which is something that draws him in. And thus, his obsession with going to school.

That sounds like a great story! There was an article in our local newspaper that discussed the problem with being upper class and how those who are upper or upper-middle class are feeling pressured to live up to the status. IE. "I need a LV purse, so I can look richer and my friends will respect me more." Needless to say, it ends up where many people in my town and the town next to mine feel superior because they are (upper class) and look down their noses at anyone who doesn't drive, or wear luxury items. So it is a timely topic, and I like that you are addressing it in this way.

Legionsynch
08-26-2007, 04:40 AM
That sounds like a great story! There was an article in our local newspaper that discussed the problem with being upper class and how those who are upper or upper-middle class are feeling pressured to live up to the status. IE. "I need a LV purse, so I can look richer and my friends will respect me more." Needless to say, it ends up where many people in my town and the town next to mine feel superior because they are (upper class) and look down their noses at anyone who doesn't drive, or wear luxury items. So it is a timely topic, and I like that you are addressing it in this way.


It's one of the two main angles in the story. I just love the idea of a class division where the whole town/school/group whatever is split between the Haves and the Have Nots. I imagine the high school as a sortof Cruel Intentions prep school for the Have's.

The other is a more thematic element, and the one I'm enjoying the most at the moment. The main character is photophobic, meaning he's got to wear sunglasses all the time, lest he suffer from migraines, severe nausea, etc. Of course there's a supernatural twist (hence the title Witch Eyes). So I get to have a lot of fun playing with the visuals for description.

Nakhlasmoke
08-30-2007, 04:39 PM
Reenkam, I'm going to second A Prayer For Owen Meany...beautiful. If you ever have the stomach for it, then read Irving's first novel - Setting Free The Bears...i bawled.

I actually really like angsty stuff - give me pretty boys and angst, and I'm hooked. I like female Mc's to not be perfect - my heroines must be flawed and real. Why so many female protags need to be uber-pretty, I just don't get.

And I like my homosexual relationships to just be normal as bread and jam. I think that's a reasonIi don't like novels that try to preach about how it's okay to come out of the closet - the underlying message is still, "oh look you're different, but us good and normal heteros accept you *pat pat*"

Shady Lane
08-31-2007, 06:17 AM
I'll definitely check that book out. Thanks!

And maybe I'll get back to that book, too...actually, I'll make a post about it...lol


And the YA boards have always been the hot place. It's like Paris...or London...

I am going to kill myself for forgetting this, so I am putting it in SUPER BIG LETTERS:

SINS OF THE FATHERS BY CHRIS LYNCH

It's about religion. And it's also fantastic. And it will make you cry. Oh gooood I love that book.

Legionsynch
08-31-2007, 06:20 AM
It just occurred to me, but I'm surprised no one's suggested this:

The thing I want to see the most in YA? My work. ;)

meldy
08-31-2007, 07:19 AM
I agree with the poster above!!

Except I have never been published and I am not writing fantasy...so I will likely be waiting until that train runs out of steam before I will even be considered.

Thats assuming I like the finished product when and if I ever get it done lol.

I still like reading fantasy, as an adult. I recently took out of the Library Jane Yolen's Dragon Series which I remember loving as a kid (they arent so entertaining as an adult though)
I thoroughly LOVED the HP series (who didnt) and like the Artemis Fowl books though which I think are both YA.

Nakhlasmoke
08-31-2007, 08:10 AM
I agree with the poster above!!

Except I have never been published and I am not writing fantasy...so I will likely be waiting until that train runs out of steam before I will even be considered.

...


Fantasy is normally the hard sell, I think. So many agents specify no fantasy. What do you write?

meldy
08-31-2007, 08:16 AM
Fantasy is normally the hard sell, I think. So many agents specify no fantasy. What do you write?


Nothing yet :e2paperba

Or at least nothing I have even close to being published lol.

I am working on a book about a foster kid..so no magic, no cool gizmos. Just a plain old fashioned teen girl.

The first Chapter can be seen in SYW...its isnt titled yet and is still in need of some heavy duty editing but the basic start is there.

I dont know if it will ever be publishable. It might not be, since its my first go at writing for anyone but my kids, but I hope to learn as much as I can in the attempt and them apply that information to the next thing I write. :e2BIC:

Or thats the plan so far lol

goatprincess
09-01-2007, 07:20 AM
I'd like to see more books that are humorous and fun but gritty and rough around the edges at the same time. A few people also talked about wanting to see this type of thing in the Edgy YA thread, too, I think. One of my YA manuscripts kind of fits this description and three publishers have fulls right now so keep your fingers crossed for me...

Danger Jane
09-01-2007, 08:13 AM
Hard sell why, do you think?

I think it's because the market is saturated with Questing books.

So yeah I write fantasy but it's also historical and nobody's going on any damn quests.

Zoombie
09-01-2007, 11:21 PM
There is one thing...one thing that YA needs now. ONE THING!

http://op-for.com/starship%20troopers.jpg

BUGS! BUUUUUUUUGS!

Seriously, I am having a hard time finding good YA sci-fi. Am I looking in the wrong spot, or am I just crazy? Becuase we need more YA sci-fi. We need YA sci-fi that is actually sci-fi...with spaceships and lasers and so on. And bugs. Lots and lots of bugs.

scarletpeaches
09-01-2007, 11:22 PM
I'd like to see a YA book win the Booker.

Preferably the one with my name on it. :D

Zoombie
09-01-2007, 11:25 PM
..pssst...what's the Booker?

scarletpeaches
09-01-2007, 11:28 PM
:Jaw:

Well spank my arse and call me Charlie! It's only the biggest literary prize in the Commonwealth!

I think it might specify 'adult novels only' but I'm not sure. The only things I do know are that it must be written in English (or thranslated into English) and by a resident of the Commonwealth. Oh, and published within the previous year before the award is made.

Longlist for 2007's Booker here (http://www.themanbookerprize.com/prize/thisyear/longlist).

There's probably something elsewhere on that site about the qualification rules.

scarletpeaches
09-01-2007, 11:30 PM
I just checked. The books have to be written in English, and children's books are only eligible if they are also published within an adult imprint - a la Harry Potter I suppose, or Meg Cabot's novels, or various other 'crossovers'.

Zoombie
09-02-2007, 12:30 AM
Well spank my arse and call me Charlie! It's only the biggest literary prize in the Commonwealth!


Oooh, sorry Charley, but I'm an egocentric American who only thinks about his homeland :P

Nakhlasmoke
09-02-2007, 10:25 AM
Zoombie, please no. Starship Troopers makes me ill (for illegal reasons that I won't go into).

If ever I want to make myself ill, I just have to picture the giant bug that looks like an arse sucking some poor fool's brain out.

Although there was sf YA back when I was a wee thing - or doesn't Douglas Hill's work count? Anyway, it's time for a revival.

Danger Jane
09-02-2007, 06:59 PM
does douglas adams's?

I mean lots of teenagers LOVE it.

But then that might be more of an IF YOU DON'T LOVE IT JUST GO DIE YOU LOSER kind of thing

ergraham
09-02-2007, 10:17 PM
Ah, Douglas Adams. I'd like more comedy along those lines, with or without the sci-fi twist. Funny is great, and RARE. IMO, Harry Potter got big first because of the mix of funny and serious...and the reason why the last books aren't as good (in quality, not quantity) as the first ones is that they became more serious and less funny. When was the last time we had something really funny in YA, a' la Christopher Moore?

Sage
09-02-2007, 10:23 PM
Aren't the Xanth books targetting YA? Definitely more silly than serious in those. First thing I thought of (maybe 'cuz the one Xanth novel I have is right next to Moore's Lamb on my bookcase.

VisionScript
09-05-2007, 09:52 AM
For me, I think I'd like to see a paranormal/urban fantasy romance (in the veins of Twilight) but with a gay or lesbian couple. Oh the pressures of high school, and burgeoning love, and oppression from parents. Oh yeah, and there's that pesky supernatural element. ;)

I'm writing an edgy paranomal YA. Would you critique me?
Clique: revised 1st chapter - Absolute Write Water Cooler (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=76093)

VisionScript
09-05-2007, 10:22 AM
I find this interesting because I'm writing about a Caucasian/African-American girl in my second WIP. I sure hope she doesn't sound whiny. lol. But, seriously, I want to avoid the stereotypes as much as possible, which is what authors writing about different races tend to worry about.

In my wip, I have the stereotypical Chinese guy (his nose in a book of nanotechnology when he's not working at his father's "number one" Chinese restaurant) and I think that's kind of funny.

I have an African-American/Hispanic who is abused by her alcoholic father, but is an artistic genius. She's in love with the shy Goth of the group, but her self-esteem is too low to approach him. I don't worry about the stereotypes so much as I worry about letting the characters be themselves. Anytime I've tried to say something with a character simply because of their culture, the character wouldn't let me (or it comes out flat and has to be cut anyway).

VisionScript
09-05-2007, 10:35 AM
I'm working towards grades, college, and eventually a career that I'll actually enjoy rather than being stuck doing something that I'll hate myself for the rest of my life for doing. I am absolutely determined to do this, so that is why I go to school, not because I enjoy it.

And I see very few YA protagonists that think this way, which frankly disturbs me. Everyone is either a slacker that hates school and wouldn't think twice about skipping, or an uber-nerd that loves school and hates the very idea.The vast majority of students don't fall into either of those categories, especially those who are college-bound.[/rant]

In my wip, one of the MC's is an overachiever because she's determined to "never ever have another pain that I can't ease myself. If a blackbird pecked off my nose tomorrow, I have the money in the bank to cover what insurance doesn't." Yet there is also a Native American who detests the fact that he's going to the "white man's" school.

Danger Jane
09-08-2007, 01:46 AM
Maybe Christopher Moore was the last Christopher Moore...