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View Full Version : Which Font Do You Prefer to Use?



skyeaerrow
08-25-2007, 02:37 AM
I'm just wondering.

I, myself, usually write using "Terminal" or "Arial" in ten-point font.

Siddow
08-25-2007, 02:57 AM
I just use Courier. It's easier for my to see typos that way, and when printing, there's lots of room for edits.

I just tend to start with standard manuscript formatting, so there's less to change later.

And welcome to the boards!

aadams73
08-25-2007, 03:05 AM
For my rough draft I use Garamond. I submit in Dark Courier or TNR depending on the guidelines.

Sean D. Schaffer
08-25-2007, 03:15 AM
For my First Draft I almost always use a typewriter, but for later drafts I use Courier New exclusively on my word processor.

jordijoy
08-25-2007, 03:29 AM
Courier 'cause It reads easy off the monitor.

Plot Device
08-25-2007, 03:47 AM
I write movie scripts, so I am obligated no matter what my preferences to use nothing else but Courier New, 12-point, 10-pitch.

kristie911
08-25-2007, 04:43 AM
Courier New 11 pt.

benbradley
08-25-2007, 04:51 AM
Wordpad text mode defaults to Courier 10 which I end up using a lot, but if I want something "readable" I'll change it to Times New Roman 12 or 14, so it looks more like a page from a book. They spend centuries figuring out fonts for easy reading, and the old "standards" are still in common use, so they work for me. Every once in a while text actually needs to be monospaced, so then it's back to Courier.

ETA: And why use Wordpad instead of Microsoft Word or OpenOffice's word processor? Wordpad does 95 percent of what I ever want to do for 95 percent of the times I write, and it loads in half a second vs. ten seconds or howeverlong for a "REAL" word processor, and also runs faster. I prefer faster response rather than being too feature-laden with stuff I rarely use.


I write movie scripts, so I am obligated no matter what my preferences to use nothing else but Courier New, 12-point, 10-pitch.
I can understand there might be a submission format, but do you really have to WRITE in the same format as your submission? Modern word processors allow you to change things after they are written, you know...

maestrowork
08-25-2007, 04:53 AM
For writing, I prefer Hoefler Text -- very pleasing to the eyes. For formatting, Courier New or Dark Courier.

veinglory
08-25-2007, 05:02 AM
Normally TNR, sometimes courier

Sage
08-25-2007, 05:53 AM
For reading, I prefer 11 pt. Times New Roman with 1.5 spacing. For writing, I've trained myself to like 12 pt. Courier New. For fancy lettering in things for fun, I prefer anything that looks like script (depends on its use which one), but especially Fioles Girls

drachin8
08-25-2007, 05:54 AM
I like to do my first draft in Wingdings and my final submissions in Bookshelf Symbol 1...


...


...



Okay, just kidding! I actually run everything in Courier New. I can read it just fine, it fits tons of submission standards, and everyone is happy. I like happy. Even more than I like Wingdings...


:)


-Michelle

Will Lavender
08-25-2007, 05:58 AM
Good ol' Times New Roman.

When people talk about Courier, I actually vomit a little. Right in the floor. It isn't pleasing, but then again neither is a font that looks like it stepped right off a '76 Underwood with a trick ribbon and the name BARB STAPLETON written in Wite-Out on the bottom left side.

Sean D. Schaffer
08-25-2007, 06:07 AM
Snipped...

ETA: And why use Wordpad instead of Microsoft Word or OpenOffice's word processor? Wordpad does 95 percent of what I ever want to do for 95 percent of the times I write, and it loads in half a second vs. ten seconds or howeverlong for a "REAL" word processor, and also runs faster. I prefer faster response rather than being too feature-laden with stuff I rarely use.

...Snipped.

Interesting. Does WordPad handle big documents well? I never thought very much about the program, but it is part of my Windows XP setup, so if it works well, I might just try it out for the sake of seeing what I can do with it.

But I am curious if it will handle big documents, like say, novel-length or chapter-length files.

Cool idea, in any case!

:)

Alvah
08-25-2007, 06:11 AM
Garamond 14 pt. for my drafts. If I ever submit something, I'll follow the publisher's guidelines.

Ava Jarvis
08-25-2007, 06:34 AM
Courier new, 12pt, for writing. Andale Mono for coding or writing in LaTeX.

I have always been a fixed font kind of girl where work is concerned, because the last thing you want to see is code written in Times New Roman.

If you really do hate Courier New, and still want to try out a fixed font (you can visually see meter and pace better when letters are the same width) you may try working in one of the smarter fixed-widths like Andale Mono (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andale_Mono), which is actually part of the core web fonts and is free.

Azraelsbane
08-25-2007, 06:48 AM
I write in single spaced 12pt TNR. I plan to submit in 10 or 12pt Courier New. Haven't decided which yet. :)

NiennaC
08-25-2007, 06:50 AM
Times New Roman, 12pt girl, all the way.

Jamesaritchie
08-25-2007, 06:55 AM
Courier 12. The font of all professionals.

Ava Jarvis
08-25-2007, 06:59 AM
Oh, and programmers may or may not quibble over fonts as much as writers do.

Evaluations of multiple fixed-widths, with judging criteria and samples:

http://www.kuro5hin.org/story/2004/12/6/11739/5249

Shady Lane
08-25-2007, 06:59 AM
I used to write in TNR, but it broke my heart to translate it to Courier at the end, so now I work in Courier the whole way.

Claudia Gray
08-25-2007, 08:21 AM
TNR 12 pt., all the way. I'd modify this if a publisher or agent asked me to, but luckily, nobody has yet.

jodiodi
08-25-2007, 08:22 AM
Chiller 18 pt.

Then I submit in TNR 12.

WordGypsy
08-25-2007, 08:27 AM
Good ol' Times New Roman.

When people talk about Courier, I actually vomit a little. Right in the floor.

IN the floor? Do you dig a little hole first? :tongue

Danger Jane
08-25-2007, 08:34 AM
TNR 12 point double spaced with the page at 75% so I can see a lot of it.

Will Lavender
08-25-2007, 06:13 PM
IN the floor? Do you dig a little hole first? :tongue

You're lucky I didn't say something like "yonder." I've been known to sprinkle that into my daily speech. Also: "holler," and "ain't," and "I'll be." I'm lucky I can form a decent sentence considering all my relatives talk like they've been in the pokey their entire lives.

Will Lavender
08-25-2007, 06:16 PM
Courier 12. The font of all professionals.

Yeah, in 1979.

Azraelsbane
08-25-2007, 06:23 PM
I'm lucky I can form a decent sentence considering all my relatives talk like they've been in the pokey their entire lives.

Yours too? :ROFL:

Plot Device
08-26-2007, 12:39 AM
I can understand there might be a submission format, but do you really have to WRITE in the same format as your submission? Modern word processors allow you to change things after they are written, you know...

If I mess around at the outset with my fonts, then when I finally cast the completed script into proper size and style, then it might not come out to the correct page count. So to avoid surpises like that, I stick with the same format all throughout.

Such as ....

The current expectation in Hollywood is that you have to zing your reader by Page 10. So while I am writing, I pay very close attention to what is happening all up through to Page 10. If some kind of a Ka-POW! has not transpired before the bottom of Page 10, I'm in trouble.

And

I loosely also follow a method called "sequencing" whereby every 15 minutes, (which is every 15 pages) a new leg of the story has to unfold. A new chapter, so to speak. One famous film that has a near-perfect texbook employment of the sequencing method is Alien. In that movie, someone dies every fifteen minutes like clockwork. So when you read the script, someone dies every 15 pages. That script is used in film writing courses because of how perfectly paced the script is.


And

One rule of thumb I try to follow is to never let any given scene go on for longer than 7 minutes (or 7 pages) so I need to constantly be wary when a scene is running too long.

And

Act 1 needs to end no later than Page 30 --and ideally it should end around Page 25. So if I find Act 1 has oozed its way as far forward as page 38, then I need to rethink something.

And

An older "cheat" that the many beleaguered Hollywood readers used to employ is to read just the First 30 pages, and then the Last 10. If that sampling doesn't impress, toss the script and move on to the next one. The newer "cheat" they use nowadays is First 10 - Last 10. So I need to be just as mindful of what's happening in my Last 10 as I am in my First 10. The Big Chase scene should really be in that Last 10. And also, I can't have my denouement be too long.

Sunnyside
08-26-2007, 12:46 AM
Hmmph, I HATE Courier -- it looks like a fanzine to me.

I was raised on Arial when I was a Capitol Hill speechwriter, because being sans serif, it was easy on the eyes, and I could blow it up to 14 or 16 point, and a Senator could easily read it on the podium in front of him without too much trouble. I tended to write all my documents in Arial after that.

Years later, though, I've found myself falling into Times Roman, 12 point, for most writing. My current editor prefers it as well. I tend to like funkier looking fonts, though -- left on my own, I use Comic Sans in e-mails, and Bookman in my own documents.

scarletpeaches
08-26-2007, 12:50 AM
I write in manuscript format but when I'm printing out my own copy, to save paper, I convert it all into single-spaced, 12pt Garamond, with no chapter breaks.

Stephanie_Gunn
08-26-2007, 10:58 AM
TNR 12 point double spaced. Anything else drives me crazy, especially Courier.

akiwiguy
08-26-2007, 12:29 PM
Courier, definitely. Somehow it's as though I can read my own work more objectively in it... I have no idea why I think that.

RLSMiller
08-26-2007, 12:54 PM
Dark Courier 12. It's not my favourite font to read, but I've gotten used to it. I find writing in the same font I'll be submitting in helps to ground me in 'writing mode.'

The Grift
08-27-2007, 01:13 AM
Times New Roman, 12. It's not my favorite font, but I'm used to writing in it. For submissions I can change as needed.

lfraser
08-27-2007, 02:32 AM
I write in Courier 12. I find it easiest to read.

heatheringemar
08-27-2007, 02:58 AM
I really liked using Book Antiqua 12pt, but I dislike having to re-format my MS's all the time, so I usually stick with TNR 12pt.

a_sharp
08-27-2007, 03:40 AM
Garamond 14 formatted to resemble right-left printed book pages. Helps me see how the end product might look, page counts, etc. Just something I like to do. Long ago developed a Word macro to reformat as Courier 12 double for submissions.

I'm so bi. I mean...what'd I say?

Chasing the Horizon
08-27-2007, 03:46 AM
I use either Hoefler Text 12pt or Bookman Old Style 12pt for the MS. Sometimes I'll use Arial 12pt for notes because it bolds well, but the italics are too indistinct to use Arial in the MS. I suppose I'll use TNR 12pt when I submit, though I really have a hard time seeing how it's better than Hoefler or Bookman when printed. I can't use Courier because my italics are almost invisible when it prints.

scarletpeaches
08-27-2007, 04:09 AM
You're not supposed to print italics anyway - in manuscript format you underline.

Memoirista
08-27-2007, 11:26 AM
I used Perpetua (from its relationship to martyrs and mothers) for my dissertation, and with Word I spaced the letters .3 em further apart than normal. Because of the number of times I shifted to Greek or Hebrew or Syriac, in various fonts, I used a set line spacing of 24, which is basically like double spacing in Times New Roman.

Now, though, I generally set up a document in Palatino Linotype, because it looks just a little bit spiffier to my eye--and because, like TNR, it's a full Unicode font--for those Greek, Hebrew, and Syriac words and letters. No need to space the letters further apart, either.

For my blogs, it's an unpretty Arial font that I would not choose, but that fits my templates.

tjwriter
08-27-2007, 08:02 PM
Bookman Old Style 12pt

This is my favorite, favorite, favorite font to write in. It looks so pretty on the screen at 75%.


You're not supposed to print italics anyway - in manuscript format you underline.

It doesn't matter when you are writing, only when you are preparing to submit. Word with let you do a global find and replace with specific formatting if you like.

Do whatever you want to get the thing out of your head. Then do whatever the agent/publisher wants to get it published.

nancy02664
08-27-2007, 08:24 PM
I like Verdana (10pt) best. For submissions, though, I go by whatever the guidelines call for.

jennifer75
08-27-2007, 08:31 PM
TNR, 12pt, DS. :)

CatMuse33
08-27-2007, 08:34 PM
Wow, I never realized how divided the writing world is between TNR and Courier! And how passionate people can be about one choice over the other.
I'm a TNR girl all the way and none of my editors have ever had a problem with it (that I know of).
Dawn

rihannsu
08-27-2007, 10:48 PM
I've used TNR since 1999 when I entered grad school and it was required.

When I learned that Courier was recommended for scripts and manuscripts, I switched MS Word's default font over to Courier so I could get used to looking at it.

It still looks different, but I'm getting used to it.

Soccer Mom
08-27-2007, 11:46 PM
I'm another Courier 12 zombie.

Of course, I learned to type on an old rickety typewriter anyhoo. :D

Bubastes
08-27-2007, 11:55 PM
I use TNR 12 and Courier 12 equally. I switch fonts between drafts because I'm weird that way, but I prefer to hand-edit on a Courier draft (more room for markups). I usually submit using TNR 12.

Doogs
08-28-2007, 12:07 AM
Bookman Old Style 10, 1.5 spacing, zoomed in to either 120 or 150%. I'm weird like that.

melaniehoo
08-29-2007, 11:24 PM
I always wondered why Courier even existed - now I know. I prefer a san serif, but I'm writing in TNR 12pt, zoomed at 135%.

As a graphic designer by day, I must say the Comic Sans reference made me vomit a little in my mouth. I even have a Ban Comic Sans tshirt. But hey, to each his/her own!

BardSkye
08-30-2007, 01:26 AM
Anything that will be eventually submitted somewhere, Courier 12pt.

Notes to myself or other non-writerly-type persons: TNR 12pt, as I find Courier a really ugly font, though I'll admit it's easier to read for long periods.

NemoBook
08-30-2007, 03:26 AM
I find Garamond to be a noble font.

ChunkyC
08-30-2007, 04:16 AM
Do whatever you want to get the thing out of your head. Then do whatever the agent/publisher wants to get it published.
Exactly.

I write my initial drafts in Courier 12 double-spaced -- basic manuscript format. I find it easy to read when sitting in front of the computer for an extended period of time and I also think it's good to be really familiar with ms format. But before I start subbing, I'll change it to Goudy Old Style 1.5 spacing, do a global underline-to-italics replace and give it one more read-through. I find when I change it over like that, I catch things I missed plus get a feel for how it's going to read in a more printed-book-like format. Then I'll put it back to manuscript format before subbing it.

J. R. Tomlin
09-01-2007, 02:12 AM
TNR 12 pt. Very few publishers seem to demand Courier any more which is ugly as sin.

And Word has bells and whistles I use constantly such as TrackChanges. Can't imagine going with a text editor.

blacbird
09-01-2007, 02:47 AM
TNR 12 pt. Very few publishers seem to demand Courier any more which is ugly as sin.

But, for submission, it isn't a matter of the font being "ugly" (there are lots of fonts more pleasing to the eye than TNR, too, such as Garamond). It's a matter of ease of editing. For which Courier remains highly practical. I do a lot of technical editing, and I assure you it's far easier to spot errors in a Courier text than it is in the much more condensed TNR text.

As has been pointed out by others in this thread, the font you use when you write can be anything you like. For that I prefer Garamond 14-pt., purely for ease on the eyes.

caw

J. R. Tomlin
09-01-2007, 07:37 AM
But, for submission, it isn't a matter of the font being "ugly"

You're right. It isn't whether it's ugly. It's whether the editor will read it and very few won't read TNR which may not be beautiful but isn't as ugly as Courier New.

The prettier fonts would get my ms. bounced, so I don't use them. I prefer to write in the font I use for submission, which is just me obviously.

desertcomet
09-04-2007, 04:33 AM
Trebuchet MS 12 pt
I like the way it looks and what it's named after.

Shadow_Ferret
09-04-2007, 05:33 AM
Since most agents want Courier, that's what I use.

Prawn
09-05-2007, 07:10 PM
I like to write in bookman oldstyle. I only change to courier if I want to impress myself with page count. I submit in times new roman 12.

myscribe
09-05-2007, 08:20 PM
Arial irritates me for some reason. :rant: A guy at work insists on using for all his submissions (to me and the world).

I'm usually not so picky about fonts, but that one I just don't like. :Shrug:

I use Times, 12 pt, for most everything except screenplays, which are Courier all the way.

Shane Fitzsimmons
09-05-2007, 08:49 PM
Courier New and Times New Roman for when I'm actually writing. If I want to stay impartial I use Courier New, and I use TNR if I want to absorb myself a bit.

I use Arial for taking notes and making outlines. It keeps things different and easy to identify.

LeslieB
09-06-2007, 07:09 AM
I can't stand Courier. I just can't read it. I tried to use it when I first started working on my WIP, but I couldn't reread and edit it because it made my eyes bleed. So I'm using my usual TNR 10 pt., and I'll convert it to whatever the submission guidelines are later.

FennelGiraffe
09-06-2007, 11:55 AM
Arial irritates me for some reason. :rant: A guy at work insists on using for all his submissions (to me and the world).

I'm usually not so picky about fonts, but that one I just don't like. :Shrug:


I prefer sans serif fonts in general, but Arial is really crappy. It gives all sans serif fonts a bad name. I can't stand it.

Zara Ravenwood
09-06-2007, 01:24 PM
Times New Roman fount 24 so I can see it. If I ever get it summited I'll make it smaller.

DragonHeart
09-14-2007, 11:03 PM
TNR 12, single spaced. It's the default for OpenOffice and I'm too lazy to bother changing it. I'm generally not picky about my font as long as I can read it. I do admit to printing in Courier, though.

~DragonHeart~

Dave.C.Robinson
09-15-2007, 12:07 AM
Arial hurts. It's only good for reading less than a page at a time. I tend to compose in either Courier, TNR, or Palatino-- but always go to courier for the editing, revision and submissions process. It just works.

III
09-15-2007, 12:09 AM
Verdana

Deirdre
09-15-2007, 12:10 AM
I write in good old Monaco (I'm used to it), but my manuscripts are printed in Courier.

I typically read at 125% zoom level.

Writer14
09-15-2007, 12:14 AM
My preferred font is Book Antique.
but i never type in it for fear of being lazy and not changing it when the time comes.

So i just use TNR 10

donroc
09-15-2007, 12:42 AM
TNR-12 all the way unless agent/publisher requests other.

LilliCray
09-15-2007, 03:35 AM
The default on my word processor is Times New Roman... I feel boring...

I prefer to use FUN! fonts like... um... Jokewood, dashes, Amazone BT, Black Chancery... but I generally change them to TNR after, like, two words. Can't read it!

I love writing journals in French Script MS. So fun!

I hate Bahaus 93, for no real reason. That's a bit straying from topic, but my legs hurt from rehearsal so quite frankly I don't care.

DeleyanLee
09-15-2007, 03:43 AM
Depends on what I'm writing.

If it's a book with pro aspirations, complete ms formatting: 12 pt Dark Courier.

If it's just stuff, then it's 12 pt TNR.

If it's a weekly newsletter for work, usually Comic Sans 12 to 16 pt.

If it's the newsletter for the local SF/F group, then it's TNR 10-11 pt.

Dave.C.Robinson
09-15-2007, 04:00 AM
I once had a roommate who used Mistral for everything he could. He thought it looked cool. Preferably orange on black.

It's unreadable.

Enraptured
09-15-2007, 05:13 AM
For my first drafts, I use MS Word's default - 12pt Times New Roman, single-spaced. When it's time to edit, I switch it to manuscript format - Courier New, double-spaced. The change helps switch me into editing mode.