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zahra
08-16-2007, 02:14 AM
I have books that I read like I eat comfort food. I don't mean like I eat JUNK food, BTW. Comfort's different.

PG Wodehouse books. 'The Good Companions'. The Damon Runyon books.

They're just well-written and put a smile on my face and don't dip into darkness (though generally I do like horror and dark themes re 'We Need to Talk about Kevin'); there's nothing there to depress you, including bad writing or boring execution.

Anyone else have comfort books?

Sophia
08-16-2007, 02:17 AM
Definitely. Terry Pratchett's Discworld books are very much comfort reading, for me. As are the Sherlock Holmes stories. I love losing myself in them.

Simon Woodhouse
08-16-2007, 02:29 AM
I'm not sure if they're comforting, but Iain M Banks' sci-fi novels all have a familiar feel to them. Though his characters and environments are always different in each book, it's reassuring to get a sense of overall coherence. As a reader, you know you can trust him.

zahra
08-17-2007, 12:14 AM
Oh, like the rest of you only read for intellectual advancement...:) i know y'all are curled up with...'Anne of Green Gables' or something.

RedandGold
08-17-2007, 12:31 AM
I have a few series of books that I read when I need some comfort - the JD Robb books, the Harry potter series, and a few others

TheIT
08-17-2007, 12:38 AM
The Last Unicorn by Peter S. Beagle
The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster
Villains by Necessity by Eve Forward
How Much For Just the Planet? by John M. Ford

Almost anything by Lois McMaster Bujold, but especially A Civil Campaign

Claudia Gray
08-17-2007, 02:05 AM
Wodehouse, definitely. Jane Austen, pretty much anything. And I never realized this before, but I tend to turn to nonfiction a lot for comfort reading, especially books about science.

Calla Lily
08-17-2007, 03:12 AM
Congreve's All for Love (a Restoration comedy)
Medieval mystery and miracle plays
Anything by Patricia Wentworth
Georgette Heyer's mysteries (NOT her Regencies)

I know entire chunks of these by heart, and they're like slipping into a comfortable pair of flannel pants and shirt on a cool day.

Moonfish
08-17-2007, 11:57 AM
I actually DO read Anne of Green Gables for comfort... Also, the whole Laura Ingalls Wilder-series, as well as many other "books for girls" from the 20's-50's. Nothing truly bad ever happens in them.

The Moomin books rank high in comfort, too.

scarletpeaches
08-17-2007, 12:05 PM
YA books. I bought Grace Dent's Diary of a Chav: Slinging the Bling last night. It's the second of a three-parter and she can't publish them fast enough for my liking; they're so funny.

Also GWTW. How many times have I read that now? Forever Amber, likewise. I love historical doorstoppers like that. Also, Karleen Koen's Through a Glass Darkly is wonderful.

A couple of years ago when I had flu (NOT a cold. I mean proper flu) my dad bought me a copy of Anna Karenina and I was too weak to lift the book for longer than it took to read two pages at a time! When I began to feel better I propped myself up on pillows and sat it on my lap to read. But I always seem to revert to that book when I come down with a cold now!

maestrowork
08-17-2007, 04:45 PM
Books are too long for me to be comforting. :) I need instant gratification. I usually go for my favorite sentimental movies.

Petroglyph
08-17-2007, 08:41 PM
Anything by Alexander McCall Smith.

josephwise
08-17-2007, 09:38 PM
Dubliners is pretty comforting. Ulysses is comfort reading too, once you've been through it once, and can go back to any of your favorite parts just to "visit" for awhile.

The Hobbit, Sherlock Holmes, Heart of Darkness, also come to mind as books with which I can just nestle into the couch on a cold day and relax.

jennifer75
08-17-2007, 09:45 PM
Call me wierd, but I reallllllly enjoyed reading At Home In Milford by Jan Karon. I could smell the greasy food at the diner, I could feel the dew in the air as the MC walked through town, I could smell the flowers, I could feel the mud splash up from Barnaby (was that his name...?) That was my comfort book. I know, I'm odd. No real crime, no murdering sprees, no sexual innuendos, no naughty words, no hate, just plain ole life in a small town with friends.

scarletpeaches
08-17-2007, 09:46 PM
Books are too long for me to be comforting. :) I need instant gratification. I usually go for my favorite sentimental movies.

Length itself is comforting for me.

What?

WHAT???

Nakhlasmoke
08-17-2007, 10:11 PM
When I want rereading comfort I either go for Pratchett, the Sandman graphic novels, or Tender is the Night.

zahra
08-17-2007, 10:22 PM
Length itself is comforting for me.

What?

WHAT???
Floozy.

Just when we were feeling all warm and fuzzy, here she is, with her flozziness.

jennifer75
08-17-2007, 11:07 PM
Length itself is comforting for me.

What?

WHAT???

The dye is getting to you isn't it?

Danger Jane
08-18-2007, 12:23 AM
Sirena by Donna Jo Napoli or A Great and Terrible Beauty by Libba Bray.

Actually anything I've ever read before and loved. Lots of books.

plaidearthworm
08-18-2007, 12:35 AM
Pratchett, romantic comedies by Jennifer Cruisie, and for 'you can do it' inspiration, The Prize Winner of Defiance, Ohio. Used to love Lilian Jackson Braun's books for cuddly, warm fuzzies that require no thought, but the last few books took a weird turn, never solving the mystery.

Ziljon
08-18-2007, 12:38 AM
I'm a Patrick O'brian fanatic. Master and Commander, the first book in the twenty-book-long Aubrey/Maturin series, is balm for my soul.

JoNightshade
08-18-2007, 04:05 AM
I like to read Nero Wolfe books whenever I don't have enough patience, time, or presence of mind for anything else. It's formulaic, I like revisiting the characters, and it's a simple read.

I also have a collection of graphic novels that I will read periodically.

Oh... there's this manga. Fruits Basket. If you want to read something that just makes you feel all warm and fuzzy inside, there you go. I have volumes 5-17. Good show, too.

Jenny
08-18-2007, 04:29 AM
Wodehouse, Pratchett, Georgette Heyer's mysteries - agree 100%. Also Sayers, Allingham, Patricia Wrede, MM Kaye's mysteries, Emma Lathen, Dana Stabenow, Margaret Maron, Emma Goldrick (old Harlequin author), Phoebe Atwood Taylor, Elizabeth Peters. I'm a huge re-reader of old favourites.

Tifferbugz
08-18-2007, 05:21 AM
Most Mercedes Lackey and Tamora Pierce. Most of their books are oddly comforting for me -- I'm a big fan of rereading books for comfort. :)

zahra
08-19-2007, 02:07 AM
I actually DO read Anne of Green Gables for comfort... Also, the whole Laura Ingalls Wilder-series, as well as many other "books for girls" from the 20's-50's. Nothing truly bad ever happens in them.

The Moomin books rank high in comfort, too.

I used to love the Anne and the Little House books. I might look one out down the bookshop tomorrow.

Cathy C
08-19-2007, 02:36 AM
It's the Mrs. Pollifax cozy mysteries for me. Oh, and one particular Star Trek novel, "Uhura's Song." I go back to that one time and time again just to re-read it because I love the setting and the characters. :)

Soccer Mom
08-19-2007, 03:09 AM
Definitely. Terry Pratchett's Discworld books are very much comfort reading, for me. As are the Sherlock Holmes stories. I love losing myself in them.


Anything by Alexander McCall Smith.


Pratchett, romantic comedies by Jennifer Cruisie, and for 'you can do it' inspiration, *snip* Lilian Jackson Braun's books for cuddly, warm fuzzies that require no thought, but the last few books took a weird turn, never solving the mystery.


It's the Mrs. Pollifax cozy mysteries for me. . :)

Yes! :hooray: Add Agatha Christie to this list. The Harry Potter books and Evanovich's Stephanie Plum books. All warm and fuzzy favorites.

DragonHeart
08-28-2007, 06:12 PM
My comfort books are basically anything written by Michael Crichton. Weird, I know. I own 15 of his novels. He was the first "real" novelist I ever read - I started with The Lost World back in third grade. I could probably write the entire book down word for word from memory if I wanted to at this point. If I'm feeling down or stressed or just having a bad time, TLW is usually my first choice for comfort. The world and the characters are so familiar to me that they're almost like friends. (The movies do not do the books justice, for the record.) Heck, just thinking about it is strangely relaxing.

"The Santa Fe institute was housed in a series of buildings that had formerly been a convent..."

Gah, I think I just might have to go read it again. ;)

~DragonHeart~

BardSkye
08-30-2007, 03:09 AM
Mercedes Lackey, any of the Valdemar novels and any of Anne McCaffrey's Pern series. Though there are many others I re-read often, those two series are never far away.

JoNightshade
08-30-2007, 03:20 AM
Oh, I recall a comfort novel when I was young: Matilda (Roald Dahl). I read that whenever I was feeling oppressed by the adults controlling my life. ;)