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View Full Version : Stardust - Book vs Movie?



thursdayb
08-13-2007, 05:12 PM
I saw Stardust last night, but I haven't read the book. I was curious if any of y'all had any opinions about how they compared.

maestrowork
08-13-2007, 07:28 PM
Saw the movie (liked it) and not read the book either. I did flip through it in the store and surprised by how short the book was.

aadams73
08-13-2007, 09:10 PM
I haven't seen the movie, but I adored the book.

Elektra
08-13-2007, 09:10 PM
I've read the book, but not seen the movie. The book was okay. The main character came across as an idiot, as it was VERY obvious that (SPOILER) the girl was the star. It was one of those things where you're screaming at the book, "Just get it, already!" Someone told me that the original STARDUST was a graphic novel, and that the story was much, much better in that form.

maestrowork
08-14-2007, 06:08 AM
Yes, I think the original was a graphic novel and a lot of the movie's visuals were based on it. Or so I heard.

Inkdaub
08-14-2007, 01:23 PM
The original was a story written in prose with an abundance of illustrations by Charles Vess. It was adapted to graphic novel format and also to novel format with the illustrations removed.

I have read, and love, the story but have not seen the movie.

Sage
08-14-2007, 08:24 PM
I've read the first two chapters of the book before getting distracted. I thoroughly enjoyed the movie, but the two chapters I read were completely different from the movie.

maestrowork
08-14-2007, 08:43 PM
Judging from the so-so boxoffice performance (opening at #4, behind crap like Rush Hour 3), it seems like people are not really into fairytales anymore. I thoroughly enjoyed the movie (Michelle Pfeiffer and Robert De Niro were excellent in it) and may even seek out the book.

Adam Israel
08-14-2007, 08:50 PM
I went and bought the book after seeing the movie. We loved the movie.

Interestingly, the night after the movie opened, several versions of Stardust (audio book, illustrated, novel, etc) jumped to the top of Neil Gaiman's top seller list on Amazon.

VictoriaLambert
08-14-2007, 11:12 PM
Judging from the so-so boxoffice performance (opening at #4, behind crap like Rush Hour 3), it seems like people are not really into fairytales anymore.


I said just as much to my hubby when I saw the dismal box office numbers! :(

Frankly, that tidbit disheartened me in many ways since I'm an aspiring YA fantasy writer. Do events such as these bode badly for the market in general?

Chumplet
08-15-2007, 05:54 AM
My kids have read Gaiman (Good Omens), and I tried to read it but it was over my head. But I'm really interested in the movie and we'll see it as soon as I get enough Air Miles.

I saw on Galley Cat they were comparing Stardust to LadyHawke, and today to The Princess Bride. Not a great box office opening, but it will nourish a following. I loved both LadyHawke and Princess Bride. I'm looking forward to Stardust.

VictoriaLambert
08-15-2007, 06:04 AM
I've watched all three films and the comparisons are valid. IMHO, I found each highly entertaining; however, I'll always have a slight preference for the Princess Bride. :)

I love that line which Montoya keeps repeating as a means of trying to avenge his father:

"My name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father, prepare to die!"

maestrowork
08-15-2007, 08:15 AM
The Princess Bride is definitely the best. But Stardust is entertaining, funny, imaginative. Everything a good fairy tale fantasy should be. Here's my review (http://reelreviews.blogspot.com/) of the movie.

VictoriaLambert
08-15-2007, 11:02 AM
The Princess Bride is definitely the best. But Stardust is entertaining, funny, imaginative. Everything a good fairy tale fantasy should be. Here's my review (http://reelreviews.blogspot.com/) of the movie.

Interesting review! 7.9, huh? That sounds about right. :)

Incidentally, here's what I can't seem to wrap around my brain:

The graphic novel and the film's description describe this magical kingdom as residing in the realm of faerie; however, no faerie--as far as I can recall--ever appear in either incarnation.

Now, I'm certain that they [faeries] are absent from the film, but I'm not as absolute in my resolve when I consider the graphic novel. I think the characters in the comic may have something akin to pointy ears, but I cannot recollect if they were actually referred to as faerie since it's been a few years since I've read it.

Inkdaub
08-15-2007, 03:39 PM
Primus and Secundus...etc are faeries. Tristran's part faerie on his mother's side. The star becomes a nationalized faerie or maybe refugee would be a better term.

What I mean is that faeries...in the most basic terms...are 'people of the land of Faerie'. They are not a specific race like elves or dwarves. Like how 'African' doesn't mean 'black'...it means a citizen of Africa. If that makes sense? Faeries are Africans.

At least that's how it breaks down in my head.

VictoriaLambert
08-15-2007, 06:43 PM
Primus and Secundus...etc are faeries. Tristran's part faerie on his mother's side. The star becomes a nationalized faerie or maybe refugee would be a better term. What I mean is that faeries...in the most basic terms...are 'people of the land of Faerie'.

Hmm, I see what you mean: The label faerie isn't necessarily indicative of a race--from Gaiman's perspective--it is a reference to their nationality. Interesting. Thank you for clearing that up. :)

maestrowork
08-17-2007, 05:54 AM
I have a question... they said something like people from Stromhold could not cross the wall -- like the star will turn into rocks and stardusts. But how did Tristan cross the wall as a baby? Just because he was half human?

Moonfish
08-17-2007, 11:55 AM
I have not seen the movie because it's not here yet, but I LOVED the book. Just loved it.
The movie might be doing "less well" (I wouldn't say it's doing poorly) because of odd marketing, not because people don't like fairy tales. The adds have put a lot of emphasis on De Niro and Pfeiffer, and they're not exactly the main characters.
In the book it never said that people from Stormhold couldn't pass the wall - it was just the star. So that would explain Tristran passing easily.
And as an addendum to the term "faerie" - it's not just Gaiman who uses the term this way, it's an established label. I liked comparing it to "African"! Genius.

VictoriaLambert
08-19-2007, 06:23 AM
IAnd as an addendum to the term "faerie" - it's not just Gaiman who uses the term this way, it's an established label.

Curious, I've seen the term faerie before; however, I've never seen it applied as a label to describe a nationality rather than a race of winged creatures except in Gaiman's Stardust. Which other well-known authors have used this moniker in that respect? I'd be very interested in reading their works. Thanks! ;)

Moonfish
08-21-2007, 11:50 AM
Gosh darn, now I can't think of any...

Nyna
08-24-2007, 08:01 AM
I've both read the book and watched the movie -- to answer the original question -- and I loved them both. The book wasn't my favorite Gaiman, but if you get the copy with the illustrations, it's pretty wonderful.

And the movie was great. I went on opening night with a friend and the theatre wasn't packed, but it was pretty full, and the audience was very responsive so it was a great experience in the the way that only collaborative viewing experiences can be. I'll have to watch the movie again to see how it holds up without the experience propping it, but I'm pretty sure that it will do just fine.

CACTUSWENDY
08-24-2007, 08:08 AM
Saw the movie and thought the concept was neat. Have not read the book and do not plan to.

Adult fairy tales... that too is an interesting concept. I thought that the MP and RD parts were a riot, and done very well. Bet they had a ball making the parts come alive in the movie. (just my 2 cents)