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Star
08-10-2007, 07:43 PM
Is this the publisher's printer making mistakes? Or were these mistakes simply not caught in the editing phase? Just curious.

Azraelsbane
08-10-2007, 07:58 PM
Is this the publisher's printer making mistakes? Or were these mistakes simply not caught in the editing phase? Just curious.

I think mostly, it's just not caught in the editing phase. Some are obviously so, such as the book I read, where the author decided to use German phrases for the first 20-odd pages, but unfortunately got very few of them correct. ;)

And then there was another one where the author constantly used "You have another think coming" instead of "You have another thing coming." The first time I thought it was just a typo, but as she used it about 20 times in her novel, and they all were wrong, it got really annoying. Now admittedly, that could be the editor not knowing the phrase, or the author. It just depends.

All in all, I'd think the printer making mistakes would be obvious (as in, the page print is light, therefore a comma might not have made it in due to low ink or some such thing). Just my thoughts.

RRK
08-10-2007, 07:59 PM
And then there was another one where the author constantly used "You have another think coming" instead of "You have another thing coming."

I like that, "You have another think coming." I only wish it were true!

Reminds me of someone who told me the other day that they were raised saying "pass mustard" as opposed to "pass muster"...

Shady Lane
08-10-2007, 08:08 PM
I'm 90% sure that the actual expression is, "Another think coming," and it's just been perverted into 'thing.'.

eqb
08-10-2007, 08:15 PM
I'm 90% sure that the actual expression is, "Another think coming," and it's just been perverted into 'thing.'.

Correct. As in, "If you think that, you have another think coming."

Azraelsbane
08-10-2007, 08:35 PM
Yup, I'm obviously just an idiot. I will amend my thoughts to "you have another think coming" simply sounds stupid, instead of stupid and wrong. ;)

Bo Sullivan
08-10-2007, 08:44 PM
I like that, "You have another think coming." I only wish it were true!

Reminds me of someone who told me the other day that they were raised saying "pass mustard" as opposed to "pass muster"...

My sister says "you have another think coming" so I have heard it before. It would be easier to say "think again" really.

lostgirl
08-10-2007, 08:49 PM
I definitely think it's an editor thing. What really bugs me is when authors do a series of books and change the name (accidentally? I assume) of one of the characters by a letter from the first book to the second. T'ton to T'ron or vice versa I'm not sure. How do you mess something like that up??? LOL

Celia Cyanide
08-10-2007, 08:52 PM
And then there was another one where the author constantly used "You have another think coming" instead of "You have another thing coming." The first time I thought it was just a typo, but as she used it about 20 times in her novel, and they all were wrong, it got really annoying. Now admittedly, that could be the editor not knowing the phrase, or the author. It just depends.

Yes, I agree that "you have another think coming" makes much more sense, but "thing" is commonly used, so it isn't really a mistake.

Using either phrase 20 times or more in one novel, however, most certainly IS a mistake, IMHO.

Will Lavender
08-10-2007, 09:01 PM
Using either phrase 20 times or more in one novel, however, most certainly IS a mistake, IMHO.

Or just bad writing.

Sassee
08-10-2007, 09:47 PM
I've seen punctuation mistakes, and once a spelling mistake. I'm also curious to know if those are the author's or the publisher's fault.

Claudia Gray
08-10-2007, 09:57 PM
As somebody who just went through a really humbling copyedit, I can tell you that you would NOT BELIEVE the number of mistakes that leap into copy. I think they crawl in there when neither editors nor author are looking. Like grammatical gremlins.

Seriously, going through this experience has made me realize how difficult it is to do a totally thorough proofread of a 300-page book that gets repeatedly revised by different people. Although some things are just sloppy (I've got my characters' names down, for Pete's sake), it is very possible to just miss stuff. At this point, I've read Evernight so many times that my brain is convinced I know what it says -- which is a really difficult position to proofread from.

Jamesaritchie
08-10-2007, 10:07 PM
There's never a way to know for sure who makes the mistake. Depending on the mistake, it can be the writer, it can be one of a couple of editors, it can be a fact checker, or it can be the typesetter.

But I think the writer is always ultimately responsible. It's his book, and he gets the last look at it. When galleys arrive, everyone else has had their turn, and the writer gets last crack. If he doesn't catch mistakes then, he has no one to blame but himself.

TwistedDilettante
08-10-2007, 10:16 PM
Mistakes in any piece of writing longer than a couple pages are inevitable. I once worked for a major newspaper, and the copy editors had a competition each year when the new edition of the AP Handbook came out to see who could find a typo in it first. It never took more than an hour to find one...and that's supposed to be the spelling/grammar bible!

reenkam
08-10-2007, 10:16 PM
Seriously, going through this experience has made me realize how difficult it is to do a totally thorough proofread of a 300-page book that gets repeatedly revised by different people. Although some things are just sloppy (I've got my characters' names down, for Pete's sake), it is very possible to just miss stuff. At this point, I've read Evernight so many times that my brain is convinced I know what it says -- which is a really difficult position to proofread from.


But I think the writer is always ultimately responsible. It's his book, and he gets the last look at it. When galleys arrive, everyone else has had their turn, and the writer gets last crack. If he doesn't catch mistakes then, he has no one to blame but himself.

Like ClaudiaGray has said, once you read your own writing enough, then you're going to assume things are okay when they're not, because you know what it should say. I definitely don't think all mistakes are ultimately the writer's fault. Sure, the writer gets to look at copies, but so do the editors and all the people who are supposed to find those mistakes. I think it's stupid to go blaming people, especially the author, for some mistakes. No, they shouldn't have happened, but pointing fingers isn't helping.

BardSkye
08-10-2007, 10:41 PM
But I think the writer is always ultimately responsible. It's his book, and he gets the last look at it. When galleys arrive, everyone else has had their turn, and the writer gets last crack. If he doesn't catch mistakes then, he has no one to blame but himself.

And even when he gets it perfect there's still room for gremlins.

I bought two books, both from Doubleday, where the proofreading was perfect. Unfortunately, one was missing a middle chapter entirely and the other jumped from page 60 to 215, went to 221, off to 86, back to 61...

blacbird
08-10-2007, 10:44 PM
Correct. As in, "If you think that, you have another think coming."

My mother, thoroughly Scandinavian woman she was, used to utter this phrase all the time, usually when I, as a teenager, did something stupid.

caw

auntybug
08-10-2007, 10:48 PM
I have actually caught it quite a bit in books. One I just read even had a person say "just call me Ruby", her name was not Ruby - it was her Mom's....

Birol
08-10-2007, 10:50 PM
And even when he gets it perfect there's still room for gremlins.

I bought two books, both from Doubleday, where the proofreading was perfect. Unfortunately, one was missing a middle chapter entirely and the other jumped from page 60 to 215, went to 221, off to 86, back to 61...

I had this happen with a paperback I bought for a lit class last semester. Fortunately, the other copies at the bookstore didn't have the same problem, so it was just a matter of exchanging it. Unfortunately, I'd already jotted notes in the margins of the first copy.

veinglory
08-11-2007, 03:16 AM
b) plus the writer failed to catch it too.

BardSkye
08-11-2007, 03:52 AM
Surely the writer can't be held accountable for the binding process?

CheshireCat
08-11-2007, 04:21 AM
And then there was another one where the author constantly used "You have another think coming" instead of "You have another thing coming." The first time I thought it was just a typo, but as she used it about 20 times in her novel, and they all were wrong, it got really annoying. Now admittedly, that could be the editor not knowing the phrase, or the author. It just depends.

Somebody else has probably already said this, but that particular phrase isn't wrong at all -- it's in common usage in some places. Like where I'm from. "If that's what you think -- you have another think coming!" Hear it all the time, and I wouldn't hesitate to use it that way in a book. In fact, I'm sure I have.

As to genuine typos and such, many are simply missed, no matter how many passes the author and editors take at the manuscript and galleys. You can know something too well -- which is why they also have proofreaders who aren't familiar with the book do a pass as well. But, still, we all miss stuff.

It never fails. The book makes it into print, and I'm scanning pages, and at least three typos jump out at me as if printed in bold red ink.

Wild. And maddening because, hey, too late to change anything by that point. Though if I catch it in the hardcover edition, I make a note to change it in the mass-market -- and hope I don't lose the note before those galleys arrive. :Shrug:

jordijoy
08-11-2007, 04:40 AM
Correct. As in, "If you think that, you have another think coming."

Well, when I was growing up it was "you gotta 'nother thang comin'." It's a wonder I can think straight at all. (smiling)

jordijoy
08-11-2007, 04:42 AM
Seriously though, I think Beth is correct.

larocca
08-11-2007, 04:55 AM
When there are mistakes in books, I see them and they drive me a little bit nutty. Yes, as mentioned before, it's damn tough to catch them all. That's why the editor reads it so many times, and then the next editor reads it so many times, and the author pitches in, and you do whatever it takes to get them all. It can be done.

Back in "the Golden Age" (cue sad string music), books were published without mistakes. But now the publishers have found that one of the easiest way to cut costs is to say, "Aw, screw it, close enough, Paris Hilton fans won't notice because they can't spell anyway."

So, it's a damn shame I see them all, isn't it? I haven't read a typo-free manuscript in years.

maestrowork
08-11-2007, 05:06 AM
Mistakes are like these mosquitos in your back yard or those pesky ants here and there in your house... it's really difficult to catch and eradicate all of them. You do the best you can, and then you send the thing out the door and hope for the best.

Jamesaritchie
08-11-2007, 05:40 AM
Like ClaudiaGray has said, once you read your own writing enough, then you're going to assume things are okay when they're not, because you know what it should say. I definitely don't think all mistakes are ultimately the writer's fault. Sure, the writer gets to look at copies, but so do the editors and all the people who are supposed to find those mistakes. I think it's stupid to go blaming people, especially the author, for some mistakes. No, they shouldn't have happened, but pointing fingers isn't helping.


Matter of practice, partly. There are all sorts of trick for reading your own writing without missing mistakes. It takes a lot of patience, but there's no reason at all for a writer to miss mistakes in galleys. By the time galleys arrive, the writer probably hasn't read the story for quite a while, anyway, and should see it with a fresh eye.

Jamesaritchie
08-11-2007, 05:42 AM
Back in "the Golden Age" (cue sad string music), books were published without mistakes. But now the publishers have found that one of the easiest way to cut costs is to say, "Aw, screw it, close enough, Paris Hilton fans won't notice because they can't spell anyway."

So, it's a damn shame I see them all, isn't it? I haven't read a typo-free manuscript in years.

I don't think editors ever say "Screw it." I do think too many modern editors rely on software to do the job for them, and this is always a mistake. Sad to say, but spell check is actually trusted by too many of today's editors. And certainly by far too many writers.

Trust spell check, and the manuscript almost certainly will have errors.

Birol
08-11-2007, 05:45 AM
Back in "the Golden Age" (cue sad string music), books were published without mistakes.

Yeah. Right. Books were still written, edited, and published by humans who were, are, and will be, fallible. It's part of what makes humans... human.

Pat~
08-11-2007, 07:47 AM
I once found so many typos and other mistakes in a book that I wrote a letter to the publisher. (I'm not usually that annoying, but this was really bad.) The editor wrote me back thanking me profusely, and offering me free of charge any 6 of the books on his booklist. He said it really helped when readers would let them know, so they could correct the mistakes in future editions.

When I got the six books, one of them had so many mistakes in the back footnoted section, I truly believe no one bothered to proof it.

Nefertiti Baker
08-11-2007, 03:53 PM
I've been seeing more and more errors in books these days. Have you noticed a higher frequency of pluralization mistakes? Y'know, 's where they don't belong, people not using s' when they should?

Also, the increase in sentence fragments are driving me batty. Use a semicolon, dang it!

Claudia Gray
08-11-2007, 07:11 PM
A semicolon won't fix any sentence fragments -- semicolons should only connect complete sentences (or items in a series where the items themselves contain commas).

priceless1
08-11-2007, 08:39 PM
Is this the publisher's printer making mistakes? Just curious.
Nope, it's almost always our fault. We're human, and stuff sometimes falls through the cracks no matter how many different sets of eyes review the work. It's mostly because the eye sees what is supposed to be there rather than what's actually there, and overlooks the mistake. Only twice did we experience a mistake that was the printer's fault. The first time was where the font came out wrong and huge in a section. The second time an entire paragraph was missing. They fixed both print runs.

priceless1
08-11-2007, 08:49 PM
I bought two books, both from Doubleday, where the proofreading was perfect. Unfortunately, one was missing a middle chapter entirely and the other jumped from page 60 to 215, went to 221, off to 86, back to 61...
Bard, it sounds as though the signatures were screwed up during the collating stage. Very scary.

Surely the writer can't be held accountable for the binding process?
No. Never.

Back in "the Golden Age" (cue sad string music), books were published without mistakes. But now the publishers have found that one of the easiest way to cut costs is to say, "Aw, screw it, close enough, Paris Hilton fans won't notice because they can't spell anyway."
There are a lot more books being published than during the "Golden Age." Costs have risen, so you may have the same number of editors and quadruple the amount of books. So while more books may be printed with mistakes, it's not due to a "it's close enough" attitude, but more of volume.

stormie
08-11-2007, 08:58 PM
Yep, I've noticed it's getting worse. I'm reading a book by a well-known author and she used the term "early seventeenth century" when she meant the early eighteenth century (early 1700s). I reread those pages a few times to make sure. It seems every book I pick up there are at least two glaring errors. But as priceless1 says in this thread:
We're human, and stuff sometimes falls through the cracks no matter how many different sets of eyes review the work. It's mostly because the eye sees what is supposed to be there rather than what's actually there, and overlooks the mistake.and:
So while more books may be printed with mistakes, it's not due to a "it's close enough" attitude, but more of volume.

Jamesaritchie
08-11-2007, 09:19 PM
I've been seeing more and more errors in books these days. Have you noticed a higher frequency of pluralization mistakes? Y'know, 's where they don't belong, people not using s' when they should?

Also, the increase in sentence fragments are driving me batty. Use a semicolon, dang it!

Sentence fragments won't be helped by adding a semicolon. Semicolons are for joining two related sentences, not sentence fragments.

And, really, there's nothing wrong with sentence fragments in fiction, as long as the writer uses them intentionally.

Sometimes, quite often, in fact, "mistakes" in fiction aren't really mistakes at all. Sentence fragments, misspellings, poor syntax, bad grammar, etc., can be there because the writer is using them for effect.

I've heard it said many times that the best way to write an imperfect novel is to write a novel filled with perfect grammar, spelling, and punctuation.

maestrowork
08-11-2007, 09:24 PM
How true. I have yet to read a novel I like in which every sentence is complete, grammatically correct. Sentence fragments are here to stay.

benbradley
08-11-2007, 10:16 PM
How true. I have yet to read a novel I like in which every sentence is complete, grammatically correct. Sentence fragments are here to stay.
Here to stay, you say?

PenTeller
08-11-2007, 10:30 PM
It seems stray quotation marks are a pesky plague that are difficult to get rid of. They're just popping up everywhere.

In the entire UK first run of Jasper Fforde's new book, someone screwed up the formatting and left out all of the footnotes (and if you're read any of his stuff, you know how important these are. They're a second side of the dialogue, basically, and pretty crucial.) That would suck to have those missing in your book.

maestrowork
08-11-2007, 10:46 PM
The hardest thing for me to catch during galley phase are the homonyms or words that are so similar that unless I look at each word deliberately, it's really difficult to spot, especially after you've read that thing for the 243th time.

Nefertiti Baker
08-12-2007, 12:24 AM
Sentence fragments won't be helped by adding a semicolon. Semicolons are for joining two related sentences, not sentence fragments.

And, really, there's nothing wrong with sentence fragments in fiction, as long as the writer uses them intentionally.

Sometimes, quite often, in fact, "mistakes" in fiction aren't really mistakes at all. Sentence fragments, misspellings, poor syntax, bad grammar, etc., can be there because the writer is using them for effect.

I've heard it said many times that the best way to write an imperfect novel is to write a novel filled with perfect grammar, spelling, and punctuation.

That's what I get for writing board postings mad early, y'all. Sorry about that.

I've used SFs on purpose before, so I completely agree. It's the sentence fragments that just jump off the page and just scream at me as "Hi! I just here!" that I don't like, and I've been seeing more of those.

zahra
08-12-2007, 01:18 AM
I bought an anthology in which a whole story is missing. It's a Richard Matheson anthology, and the story 'Prey', lauded on the back cover, is not there! Thought I was going mad. I e-mailed the publishers, but got no reponse.:(

CoriSCapnSkip
08-12-2007, 08:49 AM
Depends on the mistakes. I hate it when neither the author nor anyone else checks facts, dates, or what (such as medical conditions) is possible in real life!

stormie
08-12-2007, 07:17 PM
Depends on the mistakes. I hate it when neither the author nor anyone else checks facts, dates, or what (such as medical conditions) is possible in real life!(Bolding mine.) Yep. That's when I throw the book across the room. I mean, come on. The early seventeenth century is NOT the early 1700s. And this from a famous author with a large commercial publisher. Someone along the way should have picked this up.

How true this story is I'm not sure, but another famous author wrote a book where the female character's name changed in the middle of the story. His editor called him on it, but the author said (and I paraphrase), "Who'll notice? They love my books anyway."

Uma
08-14-2007, 12:47 PM
My copy of Harry Potter 7 was seriously messed up. I'm in Europe and bought the Bloomsbury version and figured they probably had printed the thing in the dark. While there were no missing pages there were blank pages, a large piece of black tape on one blank bage, two pages glued together and several pages in which the text was split on two different sheets which someone still made up one page while one sheet was cut in triangles (hard to descrbe but readable if you held the page at a certain angle. By page 200 I freaked out because I was afraid with all these missing pages the end would get cut off.

My husband took a peak and read the last page, said don't worry, and I got over it. I debated taking it back, but I finished reading it and it went on the shelf. It remains the strangest book I've ever bought. Didn't notice anything in the store.

Birol
08-14-2007, 03:16 PM
I've been seeing more and more errors in books these days. Have you noticed a higher frequency of pluralization mistakes? Y'know, 's where they don't belong, people not using s' when they should?

I've notice a higher frequency of individuals who believe that apostrophes are only used to make possessives or contractions. In some situations, an apostrophe is a legitimate way to make some things, like numeric dates, plural. It's not so much a right/wrong issue as it is a style issue.

CoriSCapnSkip
09-28-2007, 09:37 AM
How true this story is I'm not sure, but another famous author wrote a book where the female character's name changed in the middle of the story. His editor called him on it, but the author said (and I paraphrase), "Who'll notice? They love my books anyway."

Not only is The Spirit of the Border, by Zane Grey, totally historically inaccurate (look up the real event here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gnadenhutten_massacre and compare to that travesty of a story) but the heroine's hair changes color from chestnut to gold! Don't think they had hair coloring on the 18th Century frontier!

Does anyone have a copy of The Friendly Persuasion, by Jessamyn West, handy? I believe in the chapter about the horse--where Jess's wife tells him to get rid of a "fast-looking" horse and he comes back with one slower-looking but actually much faster--the names of their four children are changed. All I can figure is, parts of the book were published as magazine short stories, and one of those stories used different names, but how the book went into print like that with no one noticing, and why the names were not corrected in subsequent editions, I couldn't guess. Can anyone say?

lykke
09-28-2007, 10:16 AM
Spelling mistakes seem to annoy me more than syntax or other errors. But once I spot them it's like looking at the sun.

JimmyB27
09-28-2007, 12:47 PM
Correct. As in, "If you think that, you have another think coming."
I've always known it as "You have another thought coming." Maybe a UK/US thing? But, given that 'thought' is a noun, doesn't this way make more sense?

Susan Gable
09-28-2007, 04:07 PM
But I think the writer is always ultimately responsible. It's his book, and he gets the last look at it. When galleys arrive, everyone else has had their turn, and the writer gets last crack. If he doesn't catch mistakes then, he has no one to blame but himself.

James, that's not always true. I don't get the last look at my books. At Harlequin, although I get AA's to do a final proof of, there are changes made after that.

I think I've told a story about one of my books, where my editor and I had gone through a discussion process about something she had originally wanted to change, I gave my reasoning for keeping it as I'd written it, and she'd agreed with me. All was well with my so-called "final proofs." But when I got the book, lo and behold, what my editor and I had agreed upon was NOT in the book as it had been in the "proofs" -- someone had made changes after the proofs. Which happens.

I was on the phone to my editor over that one, and it was an overzealous final proofreader who made the changes. (To which I responded that someone needed to inform that person that she was NOT an editor and her job was to catch typos or other glaring ERRORS that had crept through, NOT make changes to the writer's word choice at that point.)

There are other ways that errors can creep in - at many publishers, the ms are still handcoded, or typed in from the ms. When the edits are typed into the master, the typist can make errors at that point.

We're all human, and mistakes can happen at all levels of a book's process, from the writer all the way to the final proof reader. :)

Susan G.

Susan Gable
09-28-2007, 04:09 PM
I
Also, the increase in sentence fragments are driving me batty. Use a semicolon, dang it!

The use of fragments is a voice choice. Like anything else, overuse is bad, but the occasional use of a frament is an effective choice.

Susan G.

johnnysannie
09-28-2007, 04:35 PM
[QUOTE=Jamesaritchie;1539933]Sentence fragments won't be helped by adding a semicolon. Semicolons are for joining two related sentences, not sentence fragments.

QUOTE]


Right. A rule to remember is that if the two sentences connected by a semi-colon could not stand alone, they should not be connected. In that case, use a comma instead!

alexandra6
09-28-2007, 07:56 PM
When there are mistakes in books, I see them and they drive me a little bit nutty. Yes, as mentioned before, it's damn tough to catch them all. That's why the editor reads it so many times, and then the next editor reads it so many times, and the author pitches in, and you do whatever it takes to get them all. It can be done.

Back in "the Golden Age" (cue sad string music), books were published without mistakes. But now the publishers have found that one of the easiest way to cut costs is to say, "Aw, screw it, close enough, Paris Hilton fans won't notice because they can't spell anyway."

So, it's a damn shame I see them all, isn't it? I haven't read a typo-free manuscript in years.

Hello and nice to meet all of you,

When I look wayyyyyy back to some of my father's older titles, they seem flawless. Even having my mother commissioned to do seven covers, would be a difficult task nowadays unless working out a deal which may be harder today, then back then thirty years ago. But in the more recent years, I found some books with typo's and a larger one, with obviously more.

In my father's case, as he ages, he no longer can proof and so the editors know the deal with him in that area. So, in that case the author has very little control over it when their in their late 80's and have thick lensed glasses. There comes a point in a writer's life as they age, that they can no longer use the quick to catch eyes as they once did.

But, it shouldn't matter because it should have a clean outcome when the printing is ready to take place.

Editors, writers etc. are human though and I wonder if the next phase is scanning the books through a high tech program, that would do what a human could in terms of proofing in all areas of literature?

I wish this as I also wish for my grocery list to go get itself and come back home! LOL!

In any case, just my two cents for what it's worth. The industry has changed that is for sure. As with anything else in life, I suppose.

Take care.

Best,

Alexandra
http://www.hauntingholzer.com

Namatu
09-29-2007, 04:42 AM
Aside from the whole "human" issue, there's volume. The sheer number of books being published today is massive. Publishers want the books under contract to be written, produced, and published in the shortest possible length of time so that revenue starts streaming in. Under those circumstances, fast and good are an uneasy marriage.

stormie
09-29-2007, 05:34 AM
Hello and nice to meet all of you,
Nice to meet you, too, Alexandra! (I love that name.)


When I look wayyyyyy back to some of my father's older titles, they seem flawless. Even having my mother commissioned to do seven covers, would be a difficult task nowadays unless working out a deal which may be harder today, then back then thirty years ago. But in the more recent years, I found some books with typo's and a larger one, with obviously more. I peeked down at your sig line, and clicked through. So that's who your father is! I believe I have one of his books from thirty years ago.


But, it shouldn't matter because it should have a clean outcome when the printing is ready to take place. Yep.


In any case, just my two cents for what it's worth. The industry has changed that is for sure. As with anything else in life, I suppose. Again, I agree. I do think less care is being taken as the quest for blockbuster bestsellers is being pushed and some famous novelists are churning two books a year.


http://www.hauntingholzer.com (http://www.hauntingholzer.com)
You really should look up wyntermoon (Stacey) here at AW. And Carole, who just purchased on old home and has photos of orbs in various places, like an old player piano.

Welcome, Alexandra!

CoriSCapnSkip
10-11-2007, 11:04 AM
It turns out The Friendly Persuasion takes place over many years. The two children mentioned in the chapter I cited had been born and aged several years since the previous chapter, but that doesn't become apparent till later in the book. They just turn up suddenly, unexplained. Not exactly a mistake, but makes one consider how to handle transition in a narrative.

BenPanced
10-11-2007, 05:52 PM
One book I tried to read was so riddled with errors, I quit reading during the first 100 pages. On one page, the name of a TV show was italicized; in the next chapter, the name of the same TV show was in quotes. Bad comma and period placement. Transposed characters. Finally, the author's name was misspelled on the bio page. It had to have been a bad self-pub.

takkunelwood
10-12-2007, 11:22 AM
I love when in biographies and other nonfiction, key people's names are misspelled.

The one that comes to my mind first is the misspelling of "Dan Aykroyd," so it gets on my nerves even more. (And don't even get me started on the people in the Blues Brothers fan board that misspell it! They're FANS for crying out loud.)