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View Full Version : Opposite of subplot... superplot?



javili
08-09-2007, 07:25 AM
I can't believe I've never tried to come up with a word for this before. What would you call an "uberplot" that runs across several books? You see it a lot...the Voldemort thing overriding all the individual Harry Potter plots, for instance.

But what would you call it?

Birol
08-09-2007, 08:03 AM
Are you talking about a story arc?

megan_d
08-09-2007, 11:14 AM
yeah that's a story arc.

javili
08-09-2007, 11:21 AM
Weird name. But better than uberplot, I guess.

Thank you both.

seun
08-09-2007, 12:54 PM
I quite like uberplot. Sounds like something from a James Bond film.

Higgins
08-09-2007, 03:14 PM
I quite like uberplot. Sounds like something from a James Bond film.

Wouldn't that be Plotty Galore?

Jamesaritchie
08-09-2007, 04:29 PM
I can't believe I've never tried to come up with a word for this before. What would you call an "uberplot" that runs across several books? You see it a lot...the Voldemort thing overriding all the individual Harry Potter plots, for instance.

But what would you call it?

Plot. Everything else is a subplot.

javili
08-09-2007, 08:31 PM
OK, now I know that it is not true. You can't say that "Godfather" or any one "Harry Potter" book only has a "subplot" just because there is a larger arc involved in other books.

See...I just used that "arc" thing in a knowing post of my own. The internet is just GREAT for know-it-alls.

MidnightMuse
08-09-2007, 08:39 PM
um . . . What?

Azraelsbane
08-09-2007, 08:44 PM
Just so you know, that's Ueberplot, since the word ueber has an umlaut on the first u. German major to the rescue! :hooray:

Willowmound
08-09-2007, 09:08 PM
Nonsense. It's Überplot. From über.

(Yes you spell ü 'ue' if you can't make an 'ü'.)

Azraelsbane
08-09-2007, 09:12 PM
Nonsense. It's Überplot. From über.

(Yes you spell ü 'ue' if you can't make an 'ü'.)

That was my point, which is why I mentioned the umlaut. :tongue

Willowmound
08-09-2007, 09:17 PM
I know. I was just showing off my ü.

reenkam
08-09-2007, 09:24 PM
ueber looks kind of ridiculous...I'll be sure to include the umlaut from now on for the nicer looking über.

I'd say in a series, the whole series is the story arc, the plot of each book is the plot, and then there are subplots for each book. Though, I guess there are subplots between books, too. Maybe those can be the superplots. Story arc can be changed to überplot.

überplot -> superplot -> plot -> subplot

I like it.

Willowmound
08-09-2007, 09:32 PM
By the way, umlaut doesn't mean the dots. It's got to do with how a vowel mutates depending on tense, or how it has mutated historically. It's complicated.

Ü is also not pronounced like U. Neither the English pronunciation nor the German. The word isn't "uber". It's more like "yber" (but not quite "eeber").

...And on topic, I like superplot -> plot -> subplot.

No, I don't like überplot. :)

swvaughn
08-09-2007, 10:15 PM
But oober sounds so much cooler than eeber when you say it.

Eeber sounds like one of my cousins could be named that...

Willowmound
08-09-2007, 10:20 PM
Not to my ears.

It's clunky, ugly, and about as worldly as "mercy bookoo".

Because it's not eeber. It's über. You have to say it like a German. :)

Willowmound
08-09-2007, 10:22 PM
Go here: http://www.utils.ex.ac.uk/german/pronounce/

Click the top sound icon and the man will speak a lot of words featuring ü. Listen carefully; one of them is über.

maestrowork
08-09-2007, 10:24 PM
OK, now I know that it is not true. You can't say that "Godfather" or any one "Harry Potter" book only has a "subplot" just because there is a larger arc involved in other books.

See...I just used that "arc" thing in a knowing post of my own. The internet is just GREAT for know-it-alls.

Yeah, I just use plot and subplot. And then there's the story arc, which carries the whole series.

reenkam
08-09-2007, 10:42 PM
Not to my ears.

It's clunky, ugly, and about as worldly as "mercy bookoo".

Because it's not eeber. It's über. You have to say it like a German. :)

Is it über like you-ber? Kind of? Like ewe-ber?

I admit...I sometimes say oo-ber. It sounds so much more...über, that way ;)

And I still like überplot. :tongue

Willowmound
08-09-2007, 10:56 PM
Listen for yourself: http://www.utils.ex.ac.uk/german/pronounce/

There is no equivalent sound in English. Which is why it's hard to describe.

In the topmost audio example, über is the fourth word the guy says.

aruna
08-10-2007, 07:57 PM
By the way, umlaut doesn't mean the dots. It's got to do with how a vowel mutates depending on tense, or how it has mutated historically. It's complicated.

Ü is also not pronounced like U. Neither the English pronunciation nor the German. The word isn't "uber". It's more like "yber" (but not quite "eeber").


...and "Überplot" would have to be capitalised...

Miss Smartypants

Willowmound
08-10-2007, 08:49 PM
But do German capitalisation rules (capitalise all nouns) apply when writing English? The word is German, yes, but the sentence is English. Shouldn't English grammar and rules be followed throughout?

If no, then surely all Frenchmen's surnames must be ALL CAPS at all times. But we don't do that, do we?

reenkam
08-10-2007, 08:55 PM
Is plot a German word? If not then überplot isn't really German either.

And why would we capitalize Frenchmen's surnames?

Willowmound
08-10-2007, 09:03 PM
The French do it all the time.

aruna
08-11-2007, 08:24 AM
But do German capitalisation rules (capitalise all nouns) apply when writing English? The word is German, yes, but the sentence is English. Shouldn't English grammar and rules be followed throughout?



Well, I always capitalize German words when used in a (written) English sentence (without knowing the rules, but I think a German noun is a German noun and that is always capitalised); but of course as Reenkam says überplot isn't really a German word; but it has a German prefix, transforming plot into something else.

How complicated!

javili
08-11-2007, 07:59 PM
That's what we hear about the French, anyway.

Danger Jane
08-12-2007, 12:24 AM
Well plot is one syllable so it's probably at least DERIVED from German...

dictionary.com says German: die Handlung = plot: english

reenkam
08-12-2007, 01:55 AM
Plot came to modern english through middle english from old english where it was pulled from the old french complot meaning dense 'secret project'.

Amusingly enough, that might explain why people want to keep their plots such a secret around here...