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HourglassMemory
08-09-2007, 01:56 AM
Obvisouly excluding dictionaries and encyclopedias and such, what's the thickest book you've bought?
Book, story, novel, romance...which one is the thickest you have?

I found this about myself yesterday. I absolutely drool over thick books.
You know "Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix"?
That sort of thing.

I have three books now on my desk, all on top of each other!

"A Short History of Nearly Everything" by Bill Bryson
It's almost 600 pages long! Who wouldn't want a book with such a title?

"The Historian" by Elizabeth Kostova. It's 700 pages long! I bought it because, first it was thick, and second because I thought I would give a try at other types of stories other than Harry Potter and His Dark Materials.

And all the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy stories put into one big thick book. I saw this one and just had to buy it. It's 800+ pages long!!!!

What are the thickest ones you have?

If you have a dictionary or an encyclopedia that is just absolutely mentally insane, you can type it in too.
But what I'm interested in is books with actual stories.
It can be compliations.

scarletpeaches
08-09-2007, 01:59 AM
800 pages? Pah. That's nothing. Try reading Forever Amber, Gone With the Wind, A Suitable Boy, anything by Diana Gabaldon, Penny Vincenzi or Jilly Cooper, Lord of the Rings...

Ol' Fashioned Girl
08-09-2007, 02:01 AM
800 pages? Pah. That's nothing. Try reading Forever Amber, Gone With the Wind, A Suitable Boy, anything by Diana Gabaldon, Penny Vincenzi or Jilly Cooper, Lord of the Rings...

Ditto. ;) And Larry McMurtry.

dolores haze
08-09-2007, 02:02 AM
Yup - "A Suitable Boy" by Vikram Seth. 1,349 wonderful pages, not including his delightful acknowledgement, in which he apologizes to raeders for the damage that will be done to their wrists.

CatSlave
08-09-2007, 02:06 AM
Probably War and Peace.
Also Daughter of Fire by Irina Tweedie.

scarletpeaches
08-09-2007, 02:08 AM
Oh, duh, how could I forget War & Peace?

Then there's the Bible. Anna Karenina, The first book in The Forsyte Sage sequence...

HourglassMemory
08-09-2007, 02:19 AM
Have you peopel actually read those?
Do you own them?
That's what I was asking for.

IF you do own them then ...that's great!!!! Ah!! thick books!

CatSlave
08-09-2007, 02:22 AM
Absolutely.
Every word, and more than once.

Claudia Gray
08-09-2007, 04:27 AM
Which is longer, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows or War and Peace?

Uh, one of those.

KTC
08-09-2007, 04:32 AM
lol...I just checked. On the bookshelf in front of me it's Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged. Of course, there are many bookshelves in my house. I think this might compete for the thickest though. I know my copy of The Brothers Karamazov is pretty thick too...but I think Rand's beats it.

A.M. Wildman
08-09-2007, 04:41 AM
For me the thickest book I have at the moment is: Mists of Avalon- Marion Zimmer-Bradley. If I remember right it's around 900 pgs. and change.

Gary
08-09-2007, 04:47 AM
The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich...pocket book edition.

I thought I'd never finish it.

Harper K
08-09-2007, 05:11 AM
The thickest one I bought is the 10th anniversary paperback edition of Infinite Jest. Got it last year, and its spine remains pretty well uncracked.

Simon Woodhouse
08-09-2007, 05:17 AM
Don Quixote. Not only did I buy it, but I read it too.

Though one thing puzzled me about it. People always mention the windmills, but they were just one example of his state of mind. However, they were right at the beginning. Could it be that a lot of readers don't get past the first one hundred pages, and so donít realise Don Quixote is delusional throughout the whole book? Or am I missing the symbolism of the windmills, and thus making myself look like a bit of a dunce?

davids
08-09-2007, 05:19 AM
Doctor Doolittle does the third reich

benbradley
08-09-2007, 06:07 AM
The largest book I can recall actually reading is probably "Battlefield Earth" at about 1100 pages, and this was long before the movie, and furthermore I bought it used INTENTIONALLY as even back then I didn't want to give that Hubbard guy any of my money. Basically, I wasted three weeks of my life reading it.
"Atlas Shrugged" is about that big too, but I've not read it, I don't want to be burned twice...

kristie911
08-09-2007, 06:54 AM
Harry Potter (which ever one was the longest...I'm not sure) and LOTR.

I'm not generally into books that are too thick, though I like feeling that I got more book for my money. :)

reenkam
08-09-2007, 07:47 AM
The Mists of Avalon. almost definitely

plaidearthworm
08-09-2007, 07:48 AM
Atlas Shrugged...and at the time, I was completely engrossed in it, even read it twice. Hey, I was 17. Also, I bought 'And Ladies of the Club' by Helen Hooven Santmyer last year at a used book store, but haven't read it yet. It's at the bottom of an ever-increasing reading list.

Shadow_Ferret
08-09-2007, 08:06 AM
If it won't fit in my back pocket, it's too thick.

Lyra Jean
08-09-2007, 08:44 AM
My thickest book is, South Carolina: A History. I haven't finished reading it yet.

My-Immortal
08-09-2007, 09:16 AM
The Harry Potter books...(read all)
Terry Goodkind's Stone of Tears (paperback) just shy of 1000...(read)
Robert Jordan's The Fires of Heaven (paperback) just shy of 1000...(not read)
The Chronicles of Narnia (all books in one volume) just shy of 800 (read a long time ago-rereading)
LOTR - one volume approx 1100 (read)
The Complete Works of William Shakespeare - 1250+ (read most)
Terry Brooks Sword of Shannara 700+ (read)
George R.R. Martin's series 800-900+ each...(read some, not all)

aruna
08-09-2007, 10:34 AM
A Suitable Boy.
My edition was 1500 words, and yes, I read it all. I LOVE thick books.

I have Paul Scott's The Raj Quartett on my bookshelf; I bought it secondhand some time ago an dhave not read it yet.

Just checked it: it is thick but only 500 pages long. Remember to factor in paper thickness and font. I believe A Suitable Boy overtakes them all.

I have also read various volumes of the Mahabharata, which is the longest book in the world.

DancingMaenid
08-09-2007, 11:47 AM
For me it's the Harry Potter books, Anna Karenina and this book I just bought with birthday money I'd gotten called "Russia and the Russians". I haven't gotten down to reading much of it yet, but it seems to cover Russian history back as far as there's been a Russia. So yeah, it's long.

Sai
08-09-2007, 04:11 PM
The longest books I've read (that I can remember) would be Shogun at 1,136 pages and Atlas shrugged at 1,200 (and the type was tiny too!).

ChunkyC
08-09-2007, 06:21 PM
The Lord of the Rings in a single volume, just over 1000 pages, and the Complete Works of William Shakespeare, somewhere around 1200 - 1300 pages.

I have numerous other 500+ page books, but those two are the biggies by a significant margin.

Scrawler
08-13-2007, 08:09 AM
The thickest paperback I have is "The Book of God: The Bible as a Novel" at about 800 pages. I hear the author left a bunch of stuff out. I haven't finished it because I have a pretty good idea of how it goes.

Mud Dauber
08-15-2007, 10:54 PM
I Know This Much is True, by Wally Lamb. I think it's about 900 + pages. I also own the Harry Potter books, but I don't think any of those are over 900.:e2shrug:

Julie Worth
08-15-2007, 11:13 PM
Webster's Third New International Dictionary (nearly three thousand pages), which I eventually threw out, as it was too much effort to find anything.

Oberon
08-16-2007, 01:04 AM
Man's Role in Changing the Face of the Earth, 1,193 pages. OK, it's not fiction. Wish it was.

zahra
08-16-2007, 01:28 AM
Vikram Seth's 'A Suitable Boy'? I've also got the Wally Lamb '...This Much is True', but I'm too lazy to compare them right now.

OK, did have a look at 'Suitable', and it's 1476 or something. Dunno where Wally's got to. Oh, hell, I'm going to bed with my 'Donnie Brasco'

rosebud1981
08-16-2007, 05:40 AM
It has to be The Stand by Stephen King for me. Over 1400 pages :Jaw:

scarletpeaches
08-16-2007, 05:41 AM
Vikram Seth's 'A Suitable Boy'? I've also got the Wally Lamb '...This Much is True', but I'm too lazy to compare them right now.

OK, did have a look at 'Suitable', and it's 1476 or something. Dunno where Wally's got to. Oh, hell, I'm going to bed with my 'Donnie Brasco'

I've read I Know This Much Is True - in fact it's one of my favourite books ever. It's only about 900 pages. Seth's novel is easily double that.

paprikapink
08-16-2007, 05:47 AM
Maybe it's not my thickest ever, but it's thick and I'm re-reading it now, so I'm very aware of how heavy "Dhalgren" by Samuel Delaney is; only 801 pages (and teeny tiny type!)

lkp
08-16-2007, 05:51 AM
I've read A Suitable Boy.
Twice.
I tend to buy books because of their length, and it is one of my all time favourites of any length.

Mom'sWrite
08-16-2007, 05:54 AM
The Calculus Problem Solver

It didn't solve any of my problems.

paprikapink
08-16-2007, 07:46 PM
...
I tend to buy books because of their length...

I wonder if we could see a shift in tendencies going forward, to longer books. Reading books published in the late 1800s or early 1900s, there are so many more words than in typical works published today. The author could have a character or narrator muse on topics that didn't necessarily drive the plot or develop a character, they just seemed pertinent. Nowadays that kind of thing is considered a waste of time or boring. And there are a number of "huh?" responses to this thread, indicating that longer-is-badder is still a prevailing sentiment. But think of all these kids who have cut their reading teeth on Harry Potter! They are groomed for massive tomes. After reading the Harry Potter books are they going to feel like they're getting their money's worth, once they start spending their own money on books, if they spend $20 on a 350-page book?

Robin Bayne
08-16-2007, 07:52 PM
The Stand, Gone With The Wind, Outlander and all of that series (Diana Gabaldon)

larocca
08-16-2007, 07:57 PM
Until I Find you by John Irving?
The Cat From Hue by John Laurence?
The Complete Works of William Shakespeare?
The Collected Works of Lu Xun?
The Bible?

Well, I've only read the last three, and the last one really sucked. The first two are on my shelves now, looking imposing. I'm actually looking forward to them, but my schedule's been a train wreck since I got to Thailand. One whole year ago. I brought THE CAT FROM HUE with me from China.

(I also brought my actual cat from China, since she was born there, but hers is a volume only she can write.)

Rich
08-16-2007, 08:22 PM
Don Quixote. Not only did I buy it, but I read it too.

Though one thing puzzled me about it. People always mention the windmills, but they were just one example of his state of mind. However, they were right at the beginning. Could it be that a lot of readers don't get past the first one hundred pages, and so donít realise Don Quixote is delusional throughout the whole book? Or am I missing the symbolism of the windmills, and thus making myself look like a bit of a dunce?

Keep tilting, Simon.




The Brooklyn Telephone Book.

davids
08-16-2007, 08:26 PM
Boomer flys to Mars on a Tin Can Rocket-5,495 pages-author Alibert Schwoolybert Geilhuber Tilt Monger

larocca
08-16-2007, 08:26 PM
DPeople always mention the windmills, but they were just one example of his state of mind. However, they were right at the beginning. Could it be that a lot of readers don't get past the first one hundred pages, and so donít realise Don Quixote is delusional throughout the whole book?

It's in the play MAN OF LA MANCHA, and it's also in the vernacular, so people who've never read the book at all are familiar with the windmills. And if they haven't read it, that's their loss.

jennifer75
08-16-2007, 08:37 PM
A book on photography. Don't remember the title, but it was a big one. Real heavy.

Salem
08-16-2007, 08:38 PM
The Almanac! One of my favorites! Fictionwise, probably whichever Harry Potter book was the longest.

hitchhiker
08-16-2007, 09:55 PM
I don't know if i bought any of these, or my Dad, but I read them.
They're not nearly as long as some of these that have been listed, but Tom Wolf's A Man in Full, Clancy's Without Remorse, and Insomnia by King were three long ones I've read that had between 700 and 850 pages.

zahra
08-16-2007, 10:53 PM
I've read A Suitable Boy.
Twice.
I tend to buy books because of their length, and it is one of my all time favourites of any length.
Yep, me, too on both counts.

I first read it when I was on tour in Holland and I remember giggling madly on the coach throughout the book. The part where Dr Chand Seth is so affected by the film that he forgets he's feuding with Manesh Kapoor and invites him to bridge is priceless :roll: ! i chuckled for days.

Xx|e|ph|e|me|r|al|xX
08-19-2007, 02:20 PM
The thickest paperback I have is "The Book of God: The Bible as a Novel" at about 800 pages. I hear the author left a bunch of stuff out. I haven't finished it because I have a pretty good idea of how it goes.
Xx|This one. I got that 'cause I thought it was cool. I've only read bits and pieces, though. Still pretty cool.

Also, Harry Potter. Well, I used to have Order of the Phoenix (we don't have 6 and 7 yet, so for me, 5 was the longest), but I loaned it to a friend who spilled something on it and never replaced it. XD

That's all I can think of right now. :)|xX

scarletpeaches
08-19-2007, 06:08 PM
This is why I never lend books out, now. Not even to close friends. If someone starts to say, "Oh, that sounds interesting, maybe when you're finished reading it-?"

I always interrupt with, "No. Just no. I know where this is going, and I never lend books out, so don't ask."

Maryn
08-19-2007, 07:07 PM
My books are on other floors of the house and I'm a lazy beast. Here are the fat ones that I recall.

Infinite Jest, which I haven't read.

All the George R.R. Martin fantasies in the Ice and Fire series, which I have read, some of them twice.

The Crimson Petal and the White, which taught me some new words. Good read.

Diana Whatshername's Outlander series, the first two books. Yawn by the mid-point of the second, but I forged ahead. I'm going no further in the series.

Shogun, the unabridged version of The Stand, Aztec, Winds of War... beyond those, I'm kind of blanking.

Maryn, who also likes short books

s_aileronbois
08-19-2007, 11:03 PM
Stephen King's The Stand and Clive Barker's Imajica (the all-in-one version).

And I don't have either of them, right now, because I, too, have friends.

Sage
08-19-2007, 11:42 PM
Looking at this bookcase in front of me, it'd be Harry Potter OotP (that'd be the longest of those). Not necessarily the thickest I've ever bought (I used to have all sorts of books when I was younger, that are all packed up in my parents' attic or donated to a library), but the thickest one I have now.

Lady Esther
08-20-2007, 12:56 AM
Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix: 870 pages, paperback

Stephen King's Needful Things: 731 pages, paperback

NicoleMD
08-22-2007, 12:46 AM
The thickest book I ever finished was Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson, at around 900 pages.

I didn't finish The Stand because I started having nightmares (hey, I was like 13), and Don Quixote just started getting old after the first 500 pages or so...

Nicole

Azraelsbane
08-22-2007, 01:27 AM
I don't remember which was thicker, Wizard's First Rule or The Stand, but I think it's between those two. Probably The Stand.

Doogs
08-22-2007, 06:46 AM
I was going to say Neal Stephenson's Cryptonomicon, but it's only 399,000 words.

Sharon Kay Penman's The Sunne in Splendour? 400,000ish.

I think the longest I've bought and read would have to be Dumas' Count of Monte Cristo. 484,000 words of awesomeness.

God I love me the big books...

Moonfish
08-22-2007, 09:31 PM
Vikram Seth's A suitable boy. I don't have it here so I can't say how long it is, but it's FAT.
EDIT: It's 1239 pages.

ChunkyC
08-23-2007, 12:31 AM
I was going to say Neal Stephenson's Cryptonomicon, but it's only 399,000 words.

Sharon Kay Penman's The Sunne in Splendour? 400,000ish.

I think the longest I've bought and read would have to be Dumas' Count of Monte Cristo. 484,000 words of awesomeness.

God I love me the big books...
There's another yardstick -- word count. I tried to guesstimate how many words were in my copy of The Lord of the Rings; I counted words in half a dozen lines on a page and averaged it, then multiplied by the number of lines on a page, then by total pages, and came up with something like 700,000 words. Yikes!

ETA: hey, looky here (http://www.amazon.com/gp/richpub/syltguides/fullview/22F3SA74XBA5Y?ie=UTF8&*Version*=1&*entries*=0). My count for LoR could be way off, apparently.

Just Me 2021
08-23-2007, 01:43 AM
"Jonathan Strange and Dr. Norrell" by Susanna Clark - 876 pages - is the longest one on my shelf. But I've read (and loved) "The Stand", "Gone With The Wind", and "Don Quixote." I just don't have them on my shelf to compare length.

army_grunt13
08-23-2007, 10:23 PM
I have the unabridged version of Les Miserables, which in paperback is over 1,450 pages. As far as sheer mass, it would have to be the Arnold Encyclopedia of Bodybuilding. It's 800 pages, but is also a large-size "coffee table" book. In true paperback form, it would probably have twice as many pages.

carousel
08-27-2007, 06:34 AM
The thickest and probably most expensive book was Latimer's "Business Law" but that's a textbook, so probably doesn't count.

"A Lifelong Passion" which is about 750 pages, which is the story of Nicholas, the last Tsar and Alexandra.

And my all-time favourite author's "Post-Birthday World". It only runs to just over 500 pages, but I was so engrossed, I read it in one sitting. (oops forgot to mention, it's by Lionel Shriver)

Simple Living
08-28-2007, 05:13 PM
A Complete Collection of the Works of Smith Wigglesworth

I'm not sure if it's the book with the most pages, at 850+, but it sure is the thickest.
I think the one with the most pages would have to be the Bible. Still the best, too.

The worst, by any measure, is anything by Ayn Rand. :::shudder:::

rachelstarr
08-29-2007, 12:48 AM
The Scottish Chiefs by Jane Porter and Nicholas Nickleby by good ol' Dickens. I'd like to point out, though, that thick doesn't necessarily equal long and content-rich. Layout and type have a lot to do with thickness. I own quite a few extraordinarily thin Bibles, but every word is there.

BenPanced
08-29-2007, 01:39 AM
A world atlas.

zahra
08-29-2007, 02:40 AM
Vikram Seth's A suitable boy. I don't have it here so I can't say how long it is, but it's FAT.
EDIT: It's 1239 pages.
My edition is 1476. You've been swizzled, mate. ;)

melaniehoo
09-03-2007, 06:47 AM
The Crimson Petal and the White, which taught me some new words. Good read.

You're the only other person I know that bought, let alone, read this! I enjoyed it until the very end, when I decided I'd wasted a month of my life.

Read Gone with the Wind in 7th grade. I was named after the character Melanie (no, not Rhett) and that was the soonest my mom would let me read it.

Anna Karenina has been taunting me for years - only book I didn't finish. She's on the shelf and I plan to put her out of her misery this year.

EriRae
09-07-2007, 02:46 PM
I have most of those books...and no room on my bookshelf. ETA we're talking three five shelf book cases and one three shelf unit...)

Shakespeare's by far the biggest...not only is it fat, it's TALL.

wyntermoon
09-07-2007, 03:43 PM
Ghosts by Hans Holzer - 791 pages
Atlas Shrugged by Rand - I'd tell you how many pages but the font is so $#@ tiny, I can't read it anymore

meldy
09-07-2007, 07:17 PM
Novel "The Emancipist" by Veronica Geoghagen Sweeney 1048 pages (Paperback)
Next is probably the HP book OotP.

Non-fiction: "Iron Age Communities in Britain" By Barry Cunliffe 752 pages(and a very tedious but informative read)
or my Websters dictionary..which is massive 1724 pages on ancient rice paper (its an old, old book lol)

Writer14
09-07-2007, 08:20 PM
I read the 'His Dark Materials' in a compiled book. So...<< all together it was like...900-930 pages.

Longest single book I've read was Harry Potter 5...or was 4 longer? and I've read Eclipse which is 530something.

julie thorpe
09-07-2007, 09:02 PM
I'm reading Edward Rutherford's London in paperback, 1124 pages and tiny font...I'm about half-way through, and struggling. I see it was over 4 months on the NYT bestseller list, and I ask myself "Why"?.
I suppose I'll finish it.
Maybe.

melaniehoo
09-07-2007, 09:15 PM
I'm reading Edward Rutherford's London in paperback, 1124 pages and tiny font...I'm about half-way through, and struggling. I see it was over 4 months on the NYT bestseller list, and I ask myself "Why"?.
I suppose I'll finish it.
Maybe.

So you aren't enjoying it? My mom has it & I've debated borrowing it. No good?

julie thorpe
09-07-2007, 09:33 PM
It just goes on and on. . . rather fragmented.

Quite hard work. I normally devour books in great gulps, but this one i can only take in small , lady-like nibbles.

J. R. Tomlin
09-08-2007, 01:02 AM
I didn't think the Harry Potter books were very long. LotR is long. I'm not sure how Deed of Paksnenarrion compares. It's around 800,000 words, I think, so I'd consider that long. But I don't count all the books I read in university. The books in the Wizard's First Rule series are fairly long. I've read three of those, I think, and I read the first of the Rober Jordan series and almost got through it before I bounced it off a wall in disgust (not because of the length).

You can't always tell too much going by the number of pages. The HP books seemed to be in rather large print to me, and not all that high in word count.

Suprswimmer
04-05-2008, 12:37 AM
Anna Karenina is a good book, even though it is long.
The Harry Potters are long as well, but still good.
Great Expectations wasn't exactly long page wise, but it was a long read to understand... I've wanted to read the book of all of Shakespeare's works put together, but haven't found the time. On my shelf, I haven't read them though, are big guide books for Science, Health, Water, and the Universe.

TerzaRima
04-05-2008, 01:00 AM
Yes on the Vikram Seth. At our house, we dubbed that A Suitable Doorstop.

Cranky
04-05-2008, 01:09 AM
Three or four longest books I've read were:

The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich. Ach, I can't believe I messed that up. I did read one almost as long about the Roman Empire, but I can't recall the title, obviously. LOL!

Autobiography of King Henry VIII- Margaret George

Memoirs of Cleopatra -also by Margaret George

The Harry Potter books (OOtP being the longest, IIRC)

There might be more, but those are the ones I've read more than once. I'm a fast reader, and I get annoyed with books that don't take long to finish. Sometimes. :D

The Stand - Stephen King

ETA: I should add that all those books (with the exception of the OOtP) were over a thousand pages. :)

darrtwish
04-07-2008, 06:33 PM
Eclipseby Stephenie Meyer for sure, at 622 pages. I'm almost 100% sure I've never read a bigger book then that.

JustJess
04-10-2008, 06:24 AM
I love big books, I own and have re-read many of the previously mentioned books all between 900-1000 pages including:

-Forever Amber
-Outlander series
-Mists of Avalon
-The Witching Hour
-Harry Potter
-The Crimson Petal and the The White

And I know Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time series had some pretty thick books-at least the first 4 did (that's as far as I could go) and most of the Philippa Gregory and Margaret George books are quite big...

Come to think of it, now that I look at my bookcases, I'd say the majority of the books I own are at least 600 pages...no wonder I feel so overwhelmed in my writing.

kellysarah
04-15-2008, 07:39 PM
This might be cheating, but The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy: all five parts of the trilogy.

StephanieFox
04-15-2008, 08:13 PM
I love anything by Bryson. I read his history of American English which I loved. I don't know if it were the thickest, though. I guess it depends if it's paperback or hardcover.

Upbeat
04-15-2008, 08:29 PM
The 1101 page Larousse Gastronomique, a French encylopedia of food, wine and cookery, first published in 1938. My copy is a somewhat rare 1961 Crown Publishing, Inc. reprint.

ChunkyC
04-15-2008, 09:27 PM
That sounds like a cool book, Upbeat.

So what is it with books that are so big you can hardly hold them while reading that makes us love them so? I get a shudder of pleasure out of picking up my honkin' big LoR. Just the weight of it in my hands makes me giddy. I don't even have to read any of it to have enjoyed the experience of holding it. :)

DWSTXS
04-15-2008, 09:45 PM
Intimate Memories by Georges Simenon is one I definitely remember being thick

AllyWoof
04-15-2008, 11:44 PM
The last Harry Potter book.

CDarklock
04-16-2008, 10:03 AM
The Globe Illustrated Shakespeare. 2,364 pages.

Little Earthquake
04-16-2008, 04:41 PM
I'd have to say the textbook for my Art History survey courses. That motherthumper was huge! Can I just complain for a minute about the hassle of carrying a back-breakingly full bookbag, a portfolio of works-in-progress, a tackle box full of paint, and a 24-ounce coffee cup through the wind and rain while already fifteen minutes late for class? Ah, university. How I miss thee.

Phaeal
04-17-2008, 02:25 AM
The Ants, by Edward O. Wilson and Bert Hoelldobler-- enormous book! And Hieronymous Bosch, a massive compilation of all his paintings, with the most exquisite close-ups on the great triptychs.

Then there's my copy of the Wormius Necronomicon, but we don't have to go there.

Will Lavender
04-17-2008, 03:13 AM
Infinite Jest?

Browndragon
04-17-2008, 04:51 AM
I think that A Game of Thrones runs very close to 1000 pages. I'm not at home so I can't double check. Put all of the Song of Ice and Fire volumes together -- the ones out so far -- and you have a HUGE body of work.

Cassidy
04-17-2008, 09:02 AM
A Suitable Boy, I guess. I even lugged it around while backpacking in Indonesia, which is just crazy. I had a tiny little backpack and traveled very light.... that book probably doubled its weight. But it was a great read.

JBI
04-17-2008, 05:20 PM
Norton Anthology of English, with both volumes it's over 5000 pages.

ReneC
04-20-2008, 12:17 AM
My fiancťe's list:

War and Peace - 1,455 in paperback with a miniscule font.
Don Quixote - 1,600 pages in the Spanish version.
Anna Karenina - a mere 817 pages in the Penguin paperback edition.
The Complete Jane Austen - 1,336 pages.
The Brothers Karamazov- only 913 pages.

The majority of her books are 600-800 pages. Far too many to list. She reads them all over and over again (we both do).

HeronW
04-20-2008, 01:37 AM
Heaviest biggest book--The compleat (sic) Michelangelo--lots of pix, details, not bad explanations, worth the hernia of lifting it :}

Snowstorm
04-20-2008, 01:56 AM
Benjamin Franklin by Van Doren. About 700 pages, tiny print. Van Doren wrote in a hard-to-read upper crust English and this book was the only one I've had to read slow to comprehend it. Worth it though, it was fantastic.

Brutal Mustang
04-20-2008, 01:58 AM
Probably the Mists of Avalon. That story went on and on!

EriRae
04-20-2008, 02:46 AM
The Riverside Shakespeare anthology.

Voyager
04-20-2008, 02:52 AM
The one's that I've bought myself, probably Tacitus's Annals in paperback and the Shahnameh in hard cover.

maxmordon
04-20-2008, 04:35 AM
The Complete Works of Jorge Luis Borges

aonarach
04-20-2008, 06:23 AM
1. war and peace
2. atlas shrugged
3. the stand
4. the collected what if? (eminent historians imagine what might have been)
5. russka

still chipping away at #4 one essay at a time, but have read the others a few times each

Dibley
04-25-2008, 12:32 AM
Two closest to hand that are thick:
The Glass Books of the Dream Eaters by Gordon Dahlquist - 760 pages
Encompassing Nature (an anthology edited by Robert M. Torrance)- 1224 pages

RebelGoddess
04-30-2008, 09:52 AM
Ulysses and The Crimson Petal and the White.

Loved the latter, still trying to force a re-read of the former : )

Racheal

Komnena
05-06-2008, 05:13 AM
The Source, by James Michener.

Aglaia
05-21-2008, 12:06 AM
- The Decameron
- Le Morte D'Arthur
- Camilla and Cecilia by Frances Burney
- The Riverside Chaucer
- The Complete Works of Oscar Wilde
- The Collected Stories of William Trevor

Hmm, those are all on one shelf, poor shelf. :D

I also have The Stand and pretty much every other Stephen King

CBeasy
06-13-2008, 05:44 PM
That's hard to say. I know the first book I ever read over a thousand pages was The Witching Hour by Anne Rice.

soleary
06-13-2008, 05:54 PM
The Complete Works of William Shakespeare

James81
06-13-2008, 06:30 PM
"I Know this Much is True" by Wally Lamb

It's 900 pages long and I can't remember one lull or dull spot in the book.

HeronW
06-13-2008, 06:33 PM
complete works of Poe: 2" thick,
Michaelangelo: 2.5" and about 5 kilos
Shakespeare complete: 3" thick but the type's really small

RoccoMom
06-13-2008, 06:56 PM
The Stand by Stephen King

Barber
06-13-2008, 07:14 PM
When I was about 10, I bought the unabridged version of Stephen King's The Stand. Because I was so young, it took me almost the whole summer to read it, and I've strayed from overly long books ever since, LOL.

I try not to go longer than about 700 pages, but if it's a part of a series I need to finish, I can't help myself :D (200-300 pages are ideal to me)

Phil DeBlanque
06-13-2008, 08:18 PM
Ah, probably The Swarm - A novel from the Deep, by Frank Shatzing. I'd like to check it number of pages, but I'm not home, and this computer is blocking my searchs... there's a "c" in the author's surname, between the "s" and the "hatzing"... stupid softwares.
Anyhow, it's a very thick book, and a wonderful history. Learned a lot with it.
I have the new translation of 1001 Nights is portuguese (published in 2 tomes, does that counts?). Very, very good.
I own a copy of LOOTR, too, but didn't liked it much, couldn't get to the end.

Sargentodiaz
06-14-2008, 07:32 PM
The History of the English Speaking Peoples by Winston Churchill - absolutely fascinating and I never knew the great man was such a good and prolific writer.

Righting
06-15-2008, 08:03 PM
800 pages Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell

archetypewriting
06-16-2008, 02:55 AM
Hmmm...this is fiction only, right? Cos I've got this clinical book that makes the PDR look little...

I had to buy the Complete Works of Shakespeare in college, and that thing was a freakin' weapon.

Ones I've bought voluntarily, though...

The Complete Works of Poe

It and the unabridged-extended-version of The Stand are both over 1,000 pages.

Tad Williams writes unbelievably long books...

Zoombie
06-24-2008, 11:19 AM
Atlas Shrugged, by Ayn Rand.

Fortunately, I think it burned long enough and provided enough warmth to be worth the 5 dollars.

Grrarrgh
06-25-2008, 10:11 PM
I just finished The Stand by Stephen King about 2 weeks ago - the uncut version which clocked in at about 1,200 pages. I also have The Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett, but I haven't read it yet.

StephanieFox
06-25-2008, 10:23 PM
Cancer Ward by Solsenetzian...whatever. The big hairy Soviet writer who (I think) now lives in New England. Hated it, but I was determined to plow through it. Depressing, gloomy, very Russian. I read Crime and Punishment, too. Didn't quite hate it. I've read very weighty non-fiction a lot more.

Sarpedon
06-25-2008, 10:57 PM
Well, Shelby Foote's "The Civil War; a Narrative" is a set of three books each dictionary thickness in their own right.

childeroland
06-26-2008, 03:50 AM
Mervyn Peake's Gormenghast series. Haven't started on it yet as I'm still reading Anna Karenina.

Reilly616
06-26-2008, 07:57 PM
"And god created the intigers", by Stephen Hawking. A book on the history of mathematical discoveries. 1376 pages

nerds
06-29-2008, 04:49 PM
I have two thickest books, one a leather-bound dictionary, one a medical reference, both from the 1880s. The first is eight inches thick, the second is nearly six. I have read from them over the years and still do read them, but I'd never live long enough to read every page.

Mr Sci Fi
06-29-2008, 07:51 PM
The Brothers Karamazov is probably my thickest.

Zodiea
06-29-2008, 08:29 PM
I can't believe nobody has mentioned The Tale of Genji yet... 1090 pages, by Murasaki Shikibu, Edward G. Seidensticker. Supposedly one of the first novels ever wrote, but it was in Japanese and the translation has a lot of footnotes and gets nowhere fast. I got to page fourty and my attention gave out. I'll try and pick it up again, well, once I'm physically able to pick it up again. I can't even do push ups, holding up a five pound book for hours isn't my idea of a good time. ;)

Oh, and I also have the Mists of Avalon, but then, so does everyone else.

goldenquince
07-03-2008, 01:34 PM
maybe The Tale of Genji, or the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

creamofmushroom
07-16-2008, 01:23 AM
the biggest book i bought would have to be the complete works of shakespeare

Boomergirl
08-23-2008, 09:28 AM
I'm a bit too lazy to go down and actually find my list of long books, but there are quite a few I have read and loved.

I believe Vikram Seth's A Suitable Boy, which seems to be on many, many peoples' lists is likely the longest book most people will ever have read in their lives.

Other than that:

...And Ladies of the Club by Helen Hooven Santmeyer
The Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradley
Shogun by James Clavell
Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix by that obscure Scottish writer whose name I can never remember :tongue
The Bear and the Dragon by Tom Clancy
Anna Karenina by Tolstoy
The Stand by Stephen King

Basically, when I was younger, if I saw a doorstopper, I had to have it.

Zoombie
08-23-2008, 09:36 AM
I has a new thickest book. Its thicker than Atlas Shrugged cause AS (or should I call it BS, for...Batlas Shrugged) was paperback and this is HARDCOVER!

In At the Death By Harry Turtledove. Just say the title in one of those cool, narrator voices. Like the guy who does the voiceovers for trailers. You know the kind I mean.

http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/images/n43/n219496.jpg

Good cover. Its got the weary soldiers. Ominous mushroom cloud. Airplane coming right at you. Confederate flag.

...wait, what?

Woodsie
08-23-2008, 09:50 AM
My writers publishing market guide.