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jonereb
07-13-2007, 05:48 PM
Who here listens to audiobooks? Any favorites? Three days a week, I sit while my kids practice gymnastics. Often I read during this period. However, I also enjoy watching them practice. So I bought an mp3 player and now I listen to audiobooks while watching practice. So far I've listened to parts of 1776 by McCoullough, The Black Cat by Poe and just yesterday, I downloaded Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde. Also downloaded brief biographies on Andrew Jackson and James Monroe. Many of these books are in the public domain and can be downloaded free of charge. Please share your recommendations and experiences with audiobooks.

wyntermoon
07-13-2007, 06:00 PM
I loved Pride and Prejudice for long car trips - loooooong car trips, it's about 7 hours if I remember correctly. I check them out from the library. :) Good tip about downloading, I never thought of it!

Harper K
07-13-2007, 06:14 PM
My absolute favorite is Lolita, read by Jeremy Irons. I need to quit taking it out from the library and just buy it already. It's the only audiobook I can think of that I would happily listen to out of order. I can just pop on one of the CDs -- any of them -- and get lost in Nabokov's language and Irons's utterly perfect characterization of Humbert Humbert. I'm convinced there's no other audiobook that can top it. Ever.

A couple months ago, I really enjoyed a version of Joyce's Dubliners that had each story read by a different Irish actor.

I've listened to several of David Sedaris's books on audio, some more than once, and they're fantastic. Sedaris himself reads them; his voice is so nasal and sad -- perfect for his self-deprecating humor. After I listen to one of his audiobooks, I walk around with a David Sedaris Monologue in my head for the next few days, following me around and narrating my life.

I haven't listened to any of the public domain ones yet, but I'm really excited to start doing that. I recently downloaded a Nietzsche book that I'm going to transfer to my iPod. Some light reading for the walk to work. Ha.

Ziljon
07-13-2007, 06:34 PM
Almost anything read by George Guidall is great. I'm serious, I know that sounds weird but he is such a wonderful reader, you won't be sorry. Maybe he only chooses to work on books that he likes, I don't know, but I love his voice.

ORION
07-13-2007, 08:22 PM
Anything by Paul Michael is wonderful! He read LOTTERY and was GREAT!

ChunkyC
07-13-2007, 09:28 PM
Barbara Kingsolver (http://www.kingsolver.com/home/index.asp). She reads her own stuff, or at least the one I have (Homeland and Other Stories). Wonderful.

I also have Lawrence Block (http://www.lawrenceblock.com/index_framesetfl.htm)'s Telling Lies for Fun and Profit on tape and listen to it often.

Other than that, I listen to a lot of writing-related podcasts. There's a sticky thread over in The Roundtable (Well-loved topics) with a link to a thread called Good listenin' for Writers. (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=56842)

jnesvold
07-13-2007, 10:04 PM
I'd love to get involved in audiobooks. It's hard to get a job doing one, though, especially being not in New York or LA, and not being in a union or having an agent.

Hisa Rania
07-25-2007, 07:29 AM
It's tough for me to find audiobooks I'm willing to listen to, since I have a strict rule about never listening to a book I haven't read yet, but I constantly go back to Richard Adam's "Watership Down" and Terry Pratchett's "Monsterous Regiment". Maybe they're an aquired taste though...

alleycat
07-25-2007, 07:36 AM
Almost anything read by George Guidall is great. I'm serious, I know that sounds weird but he is such a wonderful reader, you won't be sorry. Maybe he only chooses to work on books that he likes, I don't know, but I love his voice.
I'd agree. Guidall and Frank Muller are the best in the business (or were, until Muller was injured in an accident). Stephen King does a surprisingly good job too.

Ziljon
07-25-2007, 07:46 AM
One of my all time favorite books on audio is The Day of the Triffids, by John Wyndham. Yes, it was made into a cheap sci-fi movie in the 60's, but this is a noble and classic work, and the reader, a Brit, imbues the story with powerful emotion. You'll not be sorry. The Day of the Triffids.

Allynegirl
07-27-2007, 10:09 PM
I love Jim Dale's rendition of the Harry Potter books. I could listen to him all day long.

JBI
08-04-2007, 06:09 AM
Generally I do not like audio books, but Jeremy Irons reading Lolita was brilliant. I find that I can't follow an audio book since all the voices aren't my own, and therefore I have no idea who is talking. In my mind I feel I create better voices than any author can make out. Though I must say, Jeremy Irons is a perfect Humbert Humbert.