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View Full Version : Published Novelists - Advice Needed!!!



Star
07-02-2007, 10:48 PM
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Jamesaritchie
07-02-2007, 11:05 PM
My advice would be to not even mention money to the editor. If the publisher is of any size, the editor probably won't be the one who sets the amount, anyway. At any rate, money is your agent's job, so let her handle it.

From my experience, you're primary part of the talk will be to listen, to discuss creative differences in the novel, etc. It's something you generally have to play by ear.

Will Lavender
07-02-2007, 11:10 PM
Don't say a thing about money. That's not your concern. And besides, you're not going to be able to sway an editor anyway as you're in no place to negotiate. Chances are, any mention of money is going to turn the editor off.

Otherwise...

Good luck and congrats!

Star
07-02-2007, 11:11 PM
Thanks James.

Will Lavender
07-02-2007, 11:14 PM
Thanks James.

I'm confused because I don't know how to handle the "revision" talk if I don't know how much she's offering. See, it would be helpful to know that the other two editors were passing - then I'd be grateful to take any offer this house gives. Does this make sense? It is this issue of not knowing. What if one of the two editors sees the potential more than this editor? Ho-hum

You're not going to sign a contract with this person over the phone. As James said, she'll talk to you, see if you're open to her suggestions. That's it. You don't have to tell her what you want to do.

At that point, you can inform your agent that you want to set conference calls with the other two editors. THEN, once you've talked to all of them, you can make your decision.

And it is your decision, of course. No one else's.

But you likely will not know how much money is involved until they reveal their offers.

Will Lavender
07-02-2007, 11:15 PM
And if I may ask, what houses are you dealing with? What genre is your book in? You don't have to answer that if you don't want to, but it might give you some indication of what they're going to offer you.

Star
07-02-2007, 11:28 PM
Thanks Will!

Oh, I didn't plan to mention the money. I just need to know how to have the talk without knowing what she's offering. I guess I'll have to take this one for the team. That's what I get for dreaming too big.

p.s. Nope, not gonna tell the houses (sorry, i'm paranoid), but I will say they're pretty big. And thanks for the congrats :)

maestrowork
07-02-2007, 11:35 PM
Thanks James.

I'm confused because I don't know how to handle the "revision" talk if I don't know how much she's offering. See, it would be helpful to know that the other two editors were passing - then I'd be grateful to take any offer this house gives. Does this make sense? It is this issue of not knowing. What if one of the two editors sees the potential more than this editor? Ho-hum

You need to trust your agent on this. That's one of the reasons why you have an agent. Make sure your agent and you are on the same page, and let your agent do her/his job. And that includes money talk.

It's not about being "grateful." It's about what makes the best sense for you as a writer. You don't "owe" the editor anything. If it's a good book, it will be picked up by someone eventually. NEVER appear to be desperate for a deal, but don't appear arrogant, either.

Your agent is right that you shouldn't expect too much as a first-time author. If it comes, great. If not, don't think for once you're missing out.

If you don't trust your agent, then I wonder why you're with him/her?

Star
07-02-2007, 11:38 PM
This is interesting Maestro...how a post can be totally misconstrued!
This is why I'm always asking moderators to delete my posts!

I (((LOVE))) my agent. He is the best I've ever had. I trust him, but don't want to bug him with needling questions.

rugcat
07-03-2007, 12:08 AM
Your agent is right that you shouldn't expect too much as a first-time author. If it comes, great. If not, don't think for once you're missing out.You also need to trust that your agent will give you the best advice on the right house for the book.

It's very likely that any advances you'll be offered will be in the same ballpark, and if so, the amount of the advance is only one factor. I went with a slightly smaller advance because I preferred one publisher over another. (Of course, in my case, the total amount wasn't anything to brag about.) And remember, if you have faith the book will sell, you'll be making more than the advance, anyway. (Unless someone offers you a ridiculous amount.)

maestrowork
07-03-2007, 12:16 AM
I trust him, but don't want to bug him with needling questions.

No, no, no. Bug him. That's his job. If you have any questions or answers, ask him. You and your agent should be very clear on that.

I ask my talent agent everything, even if it's a stupid question. She represents me, and she's taking a cut from my check -- I can ask her anything I need answer to.

James D. Macdonald
07-03-2007, 12:16 AM
The amount of the advance is generally what the publisher thinks the book will earn over its life.

Star
07-03-2007, 12:50 AM
Hey guys,

Thanks for all of your help. I did bug him and got my answer. I was assuming that I'd be "locked in" to a deal without getting to hear from the other two. Nope, not the case. We will give everybody a deadline which makes perfect sense to me!

Lub ya'll. :)

rugcat
07-03-2007, 12:57 AM
The amount of the advance is generally what the publisher thinks the book will earn over its life.Yes, and they're generally fairly accurate, but they do sometimes get it wrong. Both ways. There's nothing wrong with believing your book will outperform their expectations.

Chumplet
07-03-2007, 04:46 AM
How wonderful that you have three editors vying for your work! Whatever happens, I'm sure it'll be the first of many angsty moments. Good luck, and don't forget to set aside income tax! And also buy me a cookie.