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View Full Version : The Trick for a Personal Rejection



reenkam
07-02-2007, 10:29 PM
EDIT

I realized that I was getting more personal rejections lately...and I came up with a possible reason and posted...but now I just realized that the goal isn't to get a rejection...

woops.

I think I'll go think about what I thought I was supposed to be aiming for......:gone:

Meerkat
07-02-2007, 11:00 PM
No wait--don't go....aaaaahhhhh! So of us ARE aiming that low!

WHAT'S THE TRICK?!?!?!?

scarletpeaches
07-02-2007, 11:02 PM
I very rarely get personal rejections so I'm assuming that means my writing is ubercrappy. So come on - what's the secret?

newmod
07-02-2007, 11:02 PM
Yeah, come on spill the beans ...

lkp
07-02-2007, 11:33 PM
I think getting a personal rejection has more to do with the agent you query than the quality of your writing. Some agents just seem more inclined to write a few personal words than others, I think. If you write to an agent with a blog and you say "I read your blog" (especially if you can prove it with some kind of reference), I think you are more likely to get a personal reply in return. Scarlet, it wouldn't surprise me if British agents *never* write personal rejections (but if I'm wrong, other with experience, please do tell.).

reenkam
07-02-2007, 11:33 PM
oh.....haha, I didn't think anyone'd want to know.

Anyway, I just like to get really, really specific in the query letter. I've found that if you make a good "general" letter, but then rewrite a little for each agent, they seem to like you more. Also, I try to find out about books they've repped and, if I've read some, comment. And, if you can, read interviews about the agent and mention the tiny little things they've said. It shows that you really know who they are and that they're not just on your list...even though they might be. :)

Anyway, it seems like agents are more likely to write out a letter explaining either why they might not be interested or why they just feel like they couldn't rep the book well if you get personal.

I hope this helps people! :)

Dave.C.Robinson
07-03-2007, 02:00 AM
oh.....haha, I didn't think anyone'd want to know.

Anyway, I just like to get really, really specific in the query letter. I've found that if you make a good "general" letter, but then rewrite a little for each agent, they seem to like you more. Also, I try to find out about books they've repped and, if I've read some, comment. And, if you can, read interviews about the agent and mention the tiny little things they've said. It shows that you really know who they are and that they're not just on your list...even though they might be. :)

Anyway, it seems like agents are more likely to write out a letter explaining either why they might not be interested or why they just feel like they couldn't rep the book well if you get personal.

I hope this helps people! :)

As someone who's about to send off a string of queries, I can say that this is a help.

Nothing is going to turn bad writing into good writing; there is no magic bullet. However, a personal letter may make the agent more likely to want to deal with you. This can lead to either spending time giving advice in a personal rejection letter (which means that if this project fails you may have an advantage querying them on the next) or may tip the scales in your favor if they have to choose between two manuscripts.

It never hurts to build a personal relationship.

Meerkat
07-03-2007, 02:10 AM
Neither of those "helpful" comments match my personal level of laziness, however...

reenkam
07-03-2007, 04:02 AM
Neither of those "helpful" comments match my personal level of laziness, however...

I guess you could always just slip a few dollars in with the query..... :Shrug:

Meerkat
07-03-2007, 04:18 AM
Yes, yes....but it violates Uncle Jim's third law of acquisition: That the money should flow towards the (grubbing, tic-infested meerkat) writer.

Thanks for trying to help with my laziness issues though, reenkam!

your pal, reetkam.