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Kudra
07-02-2007, 06:05 PM
(Have to learn to be more attentive! The book is called Marley & ME. Could a moderator please change the title of this thread? Thank you.)

Has anyone read this book? I finished it today, and was amazed by the author's ability to turn such a routine subject into so much more. I don't even have any pets and I was very moved.

It's a great book. I'd definitely recommend it if you're a dog-lover.

Mud Dauber
07-03-2007, 12:17 AM
(Have to learn to be more attentive! The book is called Marley & ME. Could a moderator please change the title of this thread? Thank you.)

Has anyone read this book? I finished it today, and was amazed by the author's ability to turn such a routine subject into so much more. I don't even have any pets and I was very moved.

It's a great book. I'd definitely recommend it if you're a dog-lover.

Yes, I read Marley and Me and loved it. You hit the nail on the head, how the author draws you into so much more than a simple story about life with a dog. I laughed and cried--the crying mostly b/c I had a 16 year old dog (who's no longer with me:cry: ) during the time I read it, and I so related to the sadness as I anticipated my faithful companion's last days.

Definitely a must-read for any dog-lover!

JennaGlatzer
12-10-2008, 10:01 PM
I'm just reading this book now, and think it's very good. One of the things that stands out to me is that the book is so chock full of similes and metaphors that it could very easily seem overdone and fall into the purple prose category-- yet it doesn't. I think this is a good example of how a great writer can break rules (well, not a "rule" exactly, but a tenet).

I'm about 3/4 of the way through it now, though, and aside from the dog vomit/poop scene at the beach (which I could reeeeeeeeeally have done without), the one thing that bothers me is his lack of discussion of his kids. I'm sure that he doesn't love his dog more than his children, and yet I did have to pause and wonder that for a moment. To me, this is a problem. I know the narrative focuses on the dog, and he probably just wanted to keep it that way, but it was strange to me to have so little focus on his kids' development, the feelings of fatherhood, the kids' personalities, etc. except insofar as they were ornaments in stories about the dog.

Anyone else feel this? Or do you think that was appropriate because of the book's theme?

katiemac
12-11-2008, 01:03 AM
I'm just reading this book now, and think it's very good. One of the things that stands out to me is that the book is so chock full of similes and metaphors that it could very easily seem overdone and fall into the purple prose category-- yet it doesn't. I think this is a good example of how a great writer can break rules (well, not a "rule" exactly, but a tenet).

I'm about 3/4 of the way through it now, though, and aside from the dog vomit/poop scene at the beach (which I could reeeeeeeeeally have done without), the one thing that bothers me is his lack of discussion of his kids. I'm sure that he doesn't love his dog more than his children, and yet I did have to pause and wonder that for a moment. To me, this is a problem. I know the narrative focuses on the dog, and he probably just wanted to keep it that way, but it was strange to me to have so little focus on his kids' development, the feelings of fatherhood, the kids' personalities, etc. except insofar as they were ornaments in stories about the dog.

Anyone else feel this? Or do you think that was appropriate because of the book's theme?

I read it not too long ago. I didn't have a problem with the lack of discussion on his kids, because overall I felt the book was about Marley's involvement in his and his wife's marriage. The kids are a part of that, sure, but the focus was how the dog affected the two of them, not the kids.

Then again, I had a psychotic (black) Lab for many years and pretty much everything Marley did, so did my dog, right down to sucking on fruit off of mango pits (except they were peaches). I treated the book like a nice reminder of what it's like to own a dog.

Kudra
12-11-2008, 02:22 AM
I think of this book every time I think of dog ownership, and I realize how difficult it would be for me to take the poor thing with me as I hop on from country to country.

I think if the author had included information about his kids, I'd have been turned off. The book is targeted to dog owners or people who love animals, and they may or may not be parents or relate to parenting. The book made a promise to tell me about the owner's life with his dog and he fulfilled that promise. If he'd gone on to explore other things that were not in the specific context without fair warning, it would lose my interest quickly.

And now that I think about it, I think this book wasn't about the author and his relationship with the dog, but more about the dog and his relationship with the family. So anything that didn't have to do with Marley didn't belong in this book.

sassandgroove
12-11-2008, 02:52 AM
hmmm... I saw an ad this morning for the movie version ...I wonder if I should check it out. (the book) Ihave avoided it assuming it would have a sad ending, given that dogs life spans are shorter than humans. Is it worth the risk?

Gary
12-11-2008, 07:04 AM
hmmm... I saw an ad this morning for the movie version ...I wonder if I should check it out. (the book) Ihave avoided it assuming it would have a sad ending, given that dogs life spans are shorter than humans. Is it worth the risk?

In my opinion, any story that can evoke both laughter and tears is worth reading. This has both, and if you love dogs, you must read it.

joyce
12-11-2008, 07:53 AM
In my opinion, any story that can evoke both laughter and tears is worth reading. This has both, and if you love dogs, you must read it.

I agree. This book had me laughing till I cried and feeling like my heart would break at times. I too was not bothered by the kids not being a huge part. As stated above, I took the book as a dogs relationship with his people. I also have owed labs for over 20 years now and could so relate to the story. I'd suggest any dog or lab owner to read the book. I thought it was a great read.

Shaun M
12-11-2008, 08:11 AM
Read the book BEFORE you see the movie. The book is good.. but Jennifer Aniston and that guy with "the nose" are going to be NO good..

No good..

No good will come of this!

KTC
12-11-2008, 04:33 PM
I loved the book...but my memory is not so great. I read it when it first came out. We'll be checking out the movie...but I think I have to re-read the book.

sassandgroove
12-11-2008, 08:27 PM
I'll put it on my christmas list.

joyce
12-12-2008, 01:51 AM
I'll put it on my christmas list.

You won't be disappointed. Make sure to keep some tissues close by to wipe up your tears of laughter and sadness. :D

Kudra
12-13-2008, 09:51 AM
Read the book BEFORE you see the movie. The book is good.. but Jennifer Aniston and that guy with "the nose" are going to be NO good..

No good..

No good will come of this!

Yeah. Completely agree. Good for the author though.

Soccer Mom
12-13-2008, 10:11 AM
I think of this book all the time with my rowdy crew of dogs. My backyard is full of peach trees. I haven't enjoyed a fresh peach for years. Bear (black lab) thinks they make great balls. He pulls them off the tree before they're ripe and brings them to me to throw for him. I've given up trying to break him of this.

The book really is about their relationship with the dog and how it bridges their life from two young newlyweds to a family with children.

JennaGlatzer
12-13-2008, 12:53 PM
Hey, no problem, I can stand on this limb all by myself. ;)

Nope, I've tried to accept his writerly reasons (and I do understand them), but now I'm on the last chapter and I still can't even remember his kids' names, nor do I remember anything about any of their personalities. I just feel like I should have gotten to know the family better. I "know" him and his wife and the dog. The three kids are almost like extras in a movie, though. That still bugs me, even though I do understand the stylistic choice.

It makes me wonder if that was an editor's doing, though.

I don't want to read the last chapter. As soon as Marley collapsed from exhaustion in the snow, I wanted to close the book and pretend he had stayed young forever.

P.S. I'm a cat person. It's still a great book.