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View Full Version : The use of Grow. And other pet peeves...



talkwrite
06-17-2007, 05:15 AM
I guess I first heard the "new" use of grow about 3 years ago from a politician. He wanted to "grow the economy". Not a beard, not an additional lobe in his brain by which to filter language usage, but the economy. Soon this "want" became a "need" as in the need to "grow the support for the war in Iraq" I have since heard it and had to translate it in annual reports and even interpret it in testimony give by manufacturer representatives.
Does this usage bother anyone else?
Are writers using it in their work as narrative ?

ColoradoGuy
06-17-2007, 05:26 AM
Well, we all have our peeves, pet and otherwise. Can't stop language, though. Me, I hate the word task used as a verb. And that High Rising Terminal thing (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=65030) -- I hate that, too.

Higgins
06-17-2007, 06:18 AM
I guess I first heard the "new" use of grow about 3 years ago from a politician. He wanted to "grow the economy". Not a beard, not an additional lobe in his brain by which to filter language usage, but the economy. Soon this "want" became a "need" as in the need to "grow the support for the war in Iraq" I have since heard it and had to translate it in annual reports and even interpret it in testimony give by manufacturer representatives.
Does this usage bother anyone else?
Are writers using it in their work as narrative ?

Hmmm....not me. I write narratives to put language in its place. No substantard usages employed even as a way of having a character have characteristics. The periodic sentence is the worst offence I allow and that usually results in nearly instantaneous decapitation.

Storyteller5
06-17-2007, 09:22 AM
One of my pet peeves is parent used as a verb. Nails on a blackboard! :(

cooltouch
06-18-2007, 10:04 PM
Yeah, we all have them.

"Gender" instead of "sex". "They/their/them" used in a singular context to avoid "gender" issues. Ack! English doesn't have gender, for pete's sake!

Uh. "Decimate" used instead of "destroy" -- what, they think it sounds better cuz it has an extra syllable?

"I could care less" instead of "I couldn't care less."

I wonder if anybody anymore realizes that to "beg the question" does not mean what they think it does? "Begging the question" is a form of logical fallacy in which an argument is assumed to be true without evidence other than the argument itself. In other words, it is circular reasoning.

Best,

Michael

ColoradoGuy
06-18-2007, 10:42 PM
Uh. "Decimate" used instead of "destroy" -- what, they think it sounds better cuz it has an extra syllable?
Or else, as the Romans meant it, they actually wish to execute 10% of the soldiers for insufficient zeal in battle. I think Cheney might go for that. (Oops -- gratuitous policital jibe in wrong forum.)

cooltouch
06-19-2007, 07:41 PM
Or else, as the Romans meant it, they actually wish to execute 10% of the soldiers for insufficient zeal in battle. I think Cheney might go for that. (Oops -- gratuitous policital jibe in wrong forum.)

Not even. The context you're most likely to hear it used in is with some empty-headed fluffy-haired talking head on TV trying to sound like he knows what the hell he's talking about. Or she, as the case may be.

Best,

Michael

talkwrite
06-19-2007, 07:55 PM
I once was released from jury duty for the reason that the defense lawyer made so many grammatical errors in his voir dire that I lost respect for him and his client. The judge, interestingly enough, allowed for those of us who wanted to present our reasons in private, for not being able to provide an unbiased review of the facts,to do so in judges chambers and I was apologetic to both attorneys and the judge. But after I explained my feelings- the judge looked over at the lawyer and said, "See? I told you so." And I wanted to serve- so I was reassigned to another panel. But I believe correct language usage does reflect on the speaker. I hope I didn't make any errors in this post...

Oberon
07-24-2007, 01:02 AM
May I add a couple of my own?

Different than, rather than different from. Bigger than, yes. It's comparative. I know there can be argument about this, but than always turns me off for some reason. I tend do do an end run, such as "not the same as," "Differs from."

I won't bother you with "like" and "as."

My mother always told me, "The reason is not because, the reason is."

I am still old-fashioned about such things as nouns becoming verbs: impact for one. Adjectives becoming nouns: "It was a fun party." etc. I know, usage changes, and new words and meanings are added to the dictionary, I just cringe from time to time. I worked for Encyclopaedia Britannica for several years, where grammar and usage was paramount. So it goes.

"In composing, as a general rule, run your pen through every other word you have written; you have no idea what vigor it will give your style" Sydney Smith

ColoradoGuy
07-24-2007, 01:54 AM
I'm growing more and more to hate "stake holders" as collective noun for those with an interest in something.

robeiae
07-24-2007, 04:50 PM
Outfit.

It. Is. A. Noun.

pconsidine
07-24-2007, 05:48 PM
I'm growing more and more to hate "stake holders" as collective noun for those with an interest in something.The business world is responsible for most of the language "innovations" that drive me insane (like the aforementioned "impact" as verb). Of course, it only serves to make me doubly crazy when one of those idiocies is then modified further (e.g., "impact" as verb becoming "impactful" as adjective).

Thank god I don't do editorial work anymore. I'd have hung myself long before now. And wouldn't that have been impactful?

larocca
07-24-2007, 05:55 PM
"I like verbing words. It weirds language."
--Calvin (of Calvin and Hobbes)

(It drives me nuts, but I'm only sharing this quote to grow this thread.)

My biggie is those damn yard signs that say something like "The LaRocca's." Um, his what? No wait, don't answer that!

ColoradoGuy
07-24-2007, 06:51 PM
Outfit.

It. Is. A. Noun.
I don't know about that one, Rob; my shorter OED says it was used as both a transitive and intransitive verb by the late 19th century. Are you still back in the early 19th sipping tea with Lord Grey?

robeiae
07-24-2007, 08:09 PM
I don't know about that one, Rob; my shorter OED says it was used as both a transitive and intransitive verb by the late 19th century. Are you still back in the early 19th sipping tea with Lord Grey?Any usage differing with that of the later 17th is bullocks.

Magdalen
07-24-2007, 10:22 PM
Eddie Bauer moans from inside his mummy bag.

talkwrite
07-25-2007, 09:17 PM
Benchmarks
It's everywhere. I am translating it in lots of power phrased memo's and Board of Director's minutes. It is not truly understood either-allowing for so many misinterpretations.
On this date, I hereby predict that it will be a verb by the end of the year.
"Have you benchmarked today"? :Soapbox:

ColoradoGuy
07-26-2007, 01:54 AM
Too late-- it already is (http://www.thefreedictionary.com/benchmarked).

robeiae
07-26-2007, 04:49 AM
Ya. Next you'll tell me "text" is a verb...

talkwrite
07-27-2007, 02:23 AM
Too late-- it already is (http://www.thefreedictionary.com/benchmarked).
I sit benchmarked
:Jaw:

kiplet
07-27-2007, 05:06 AM
Next you'll tell me "text" is a verb...


No, txt is a verb.

girlyswot
09-07-2007, 10:51 PM
"I could care less" instead of "I couldn't care less."



Fortunately, that's one that doesn't yet appear to have crossed the Atlantic to the UK. Don't these people ever stop to think about the meaning of what they are saying? Or how stupid it makes them sound?

No, I suppose they don't.

Alvah
09-08-2007, 12:00 AM
I don't like the misuse of "graduate". As in "I graduated high school".
No, you didn't. You graduated FROM high school.

pconsidine
09-08-2007, 12:38 AM
My high school was built on the side of a hill. It was a graduated high school.


Honest.

ColoradoGuy
09-08-2007, 01:53 AM
So the person who built it graduated the high school?

pconsidine
09-08-2007, 05:29 AM
Zackly.

Nymtoc
09-08-2007, 07:40 AM
Efforting.

This drives me out of my skull.

It turns up in TV newscasts: "We've lost that link with Sam Glotz in Washington, but we're efforting to get it back."

Efforting?

When did "effort" become a verb?

I've got a suggestion, you television dorks: There's a much simpler verb to express your thought. You've been using it all your life. It starts with "t." Give up?

Roger J Carlson
09-08-2007, 07:58 AM
Fortunately, that's one that doesn't yet appear to have crossed the Atlantic to the UK. Don't these people ever stop to think about the meaning of what they are saying? Or how stupid it makes them sound?Irregardless of what you think, they could care less.

Roger J Carlson
09-08-2007, 08:03 AM
Of course, my number one pet peeve is "horseback riding".

BenPanced
09-09-2007, 05:20 AM
I hate horseback riding, too. Makes my thighs sore.

Oh. Wait. Wrong thread. Sorry.

One of mine: "you know what I'm saying" as punctuation.

Roger J Carlson
09-09-2007, 05:40 AM
I hate horseback riding, too. Makes my thighs sore.No, no, the term itself. Will someone please tell me where else you would ride a horse? Do we say we're going for a bikeseat ride?

talkwrite
09-11-2007, 01:10 AM
One of mine: "you know what I'm saying" as punctuation.

That one is as bad as:
You hear what I'm saying?
I transcribed a 6 minute conversation during which it was uttered 142 times. Four times the two people simply said it back and forth.

totidem_verbis
09-11-2007, 08:27 AM
I'm growing more and more to hate "stake holders" as collective noun for those with an interest in something.

Yes, it's terrible! I've even seen it spelled "steak holders" which makes me wonder what happens during "meatings". :D

pconsidine
09-11-2007, 07:23 PM
No, no, the term itself. Will someone please tell me where else you would ride a horse? Do we say we're going for a bikeseat ride?This one's for you, Roger:

http://www.horsemen-of-the-apocalypse.co.uk/gallery/fullsize_photo.php?photo=trick_riding/oct030139.jpg