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JL_Benet
06-12-2007, 04:02 AM
Have any of you heard of Drollerie Press? Here is some info I found:
http://www.drolleriepress.com/
http://drollerie.livejournal.com/
http://ciarcullen.blogspot.com/2007/05/interview-with-drollerie-press.html
http://www.ralan.com/publishr/listings/info/drollerie.htm
http://joelysueburkhart.com/blog/2007/04/13/drollerie-press/
http://imogenhowson.blogspot.com/2007/05/drollerie-press.html
http://community.livejournal.com/re_mused/14460.html
http://www.drollerie.com/
http://serasempre.livejournal.com/
http://www.zoominfo.com/Search/PersonDetail.aspx?PersonID=-128256
http://miladyinsanity.wordpress.com/2007/07/20/6-questions-with-deena-fisher/

BarbaraSheridan
06-12-2007, 07:51 AM
One of the head folks there is Amy Garvey she used to be an editor with Kensington I believe. She's also a published author.

CaoPaux
06-20-2007, 12:11 AM
They look to be in a far better starting position than most e/POD, but marketing and distribution are hurdles for any format. We'll have a better idea of what they can do after a couple laps in six months or so.

veinglory
06-22-2007, 03:05 AM
I agree. They are new but I think they look very good.

heatheringemar
07-10-2007, 03:18 AM
Very very intriguing. As soon as my urban fantasy novella/novel is done, I think I'm going to query them about it. :)

RTH
07-10-2007, 06:31 PM
I'm not sure I like the "We do not guarantee that a bookstore will stock our titles" statement on their submissions page. I know they're trying to say something like "we're a new, small press, so don't expect to see yourself on the bestseller shelf at Barnes & Noble," but nevertheless it doesn't exactly fill the prospective author with confidence about their motivation/ability to get their books on shelves.

Sounds like great editing, though.

herdon
07-10-2007, 06:45 PM
I'm not sure I like the "We do not guarantee that a bookstore will stock our titles" statement on their submissions page. I know they're trying to say something like "we're a new, small press, so don't expect to see yourself on the bestseller shelf at Barnes & Noble," but nevertheless it doesn't exactly fill the prospective author with confidence about their motivation/ability to get their books on shelves.

Sounds like great editing, though.

I think the honesty is refreshing. Kudos to them.

heatheringemar
07-22-2007, 12:38 AM
Their on-site bookstore just opened yesterday.

God, their covers are gor-geous!

veinglory
07-22-2007, 12:44 AM
The covers are nice, as is the honesty.

heatheringemar
07-22-2007, 10:09 AM
They just uploaded a rather nice FAQ page, including bookstore/downloading ebook info as well as submission/press info (that's at the bottom).

I've been hanging around their main blog (on the website) these last couple of weeks, making comments and such, and Deena seems to be a really nice person. Already she's listening to feedback -- and responding! :)

I grow more impressed by the minute.

heatheringemar
07-31-2007, 08:36 AM
Well, I've sent them my MS.

Just the other day, I heard from one of their authors that they've been an absolute dream to work with.

joyce
07-31-2007, 09:56 PM
I just wanted to add that I submitted to them today. I was instantly impressed that Deena Fisher emailed me back within fifteen minutes to let me know that she received my materials, and is going to look it over and get back to me asap. Though I'm still trying to land an agent for my novel, which is starting to make me feel really depressed, this is my first try directly with a publisher. I found her instant contact refreshing and it filled me with a little more hope. I might still get rejected, but at least these people seem to take the time to contact you.

LittleGinaT
08-01-2007, 07:12 AM
All indications are that this is an agency off to a good start. I am adding them to my to-do list. Keep us posted!

herdon
08-01-2007, 08:11 AM
I read the FAQ and it had some definite turnoffs in it. They describe PoD as a way of printing, for one. The whole thing about getting books in the store sounds very naive.

I think it is safe to say that they are an e-book publisher. They'll use a PoD model for selling print books, but won't have distribution and probably no marketing for the print side.

BarbaraSheridan
08-02-2007, 06:00 AM
Amy Garvey who is part of Drollerie was an editor at Kensington in addition to being a published author now, she definitely isn't naive about how books get into stores.

herdon
08-02-2007, 07:52 AM
5. You say on your submissions page that you donít promise my book will be on bookstore shelves. Donít you use a distributor?
A. We use Ingrams for distribution. Thatís not the problem. The agency that handles ISBN numbers for the US, R.R. Bowker (http://www.bowker.com/press/bowker/2007_0531_bowker.htm), says: ďÖU.S. title output in 2006 increased by more than 3% to 291,920 new titles and editions, up from the 282,500 published in 2005. Ē
Thatís a lot of books. I canít think of many bookstores that could hold that many. If we publish your book, it will appear on Amazon and other online venues. If you want it in your local bookstore, you need to go to them and ask them to stock it. While youíre there, ask if you can schedule a signing or reading event as well. Promise giveaways, a good show, and some entertainment. Most bookstores (and libraries!) are happy to hear of local authors and want to know youíre out there. Other bookstores outside your local area may put your book on their shelves because they like the sound of it, itís in their favorite genre, the buyer is a fan of yours, or a number of other reasons we canít foresee. We like those, and we do our best to get their attention, but the decision is theirs.



You don't think the underlined part sounds either naive or intentionally misleading? As if a bookstore is going to pull out a list of 292,920 books, read the names, read the genres, read the synopsis, and choose ones they think sound good?

heatheringemar
08-02-2007, 10:04 AM
That actually sounds like something a small/indie bookstore owner might do.

Not to mention, my coworker who does the collection ordering at our library reads up on books before ordering them. That includes names, genres, and synopses. ;)

Rachael de Vienne
08-17-2007, 05:16 AM
I've just received their contract. I'm very impressed with Deena Fisher, and the contract seems fair. Yes, they're a very small press. But, I couldn't be more impressed at this point.
-Rachael de Vienne

GhostAuthor
08-17-2007, 04:15 PM
The biggest question I have is this: Is this an e-pub or are all their titles released in print. I'm asking because I've noticed some titles are only available in electronic format while others are in print. And somewhere (can't remember where) on a blog I read an interview where they said not all titles will make print.
Can anyone clarify this?

Chicken Warrior
08-17-2007, 09:13 PM
I was under the impression all titles would be released as POD or mass-market paperbacks, at some point, but I'm not 100% sure.

I'm now on Drollerie's list of potential cover-artists. I haven't had any assignments yet, but I was very impressed by Deena's immediate and professional response and feedback.

batgirl
08-18-2007, 03:58 AM
Hi Rachael! And congrats!
I'd seriously consider Drollerie for the co-written novel, but I'm not sure how my co-writer feels about e/pod publishing. For one of those covers, though...
-Barbara

miladyinsanity
08-27-2007, 02:17 PM
I'm miladyinsanity who interviewed Deena Fisher.

My understanding is that with the exception of Jennifer Cloud's novel, the rest of the titles published so far are novellas and short stories, and that they will eventually be collected and published in anthologies.

I do know that their first print title will be Deborah Grabien's Still Life With Devils, available in online and in print simultaneously from December, and I have the impression that simultaneous release is the model that they are working towards.

Hope this helps!

heatheringemar
08-30-2007, 06:47 AM
This seems to bode well for them: they are getting reviews for their books from Publisher's Weekly, Library Journal, and Boston Globe (according to Amazon.com).

Chicken Warrior
08-30-2007, 08:30 AM
Yup, they're doing well for themselves.

J. R. Tomlin
08-30-2007, 09:08 AM
Reading their submission page, they seem to have a pretty narrow range of interest. Of course, that may be a good thing for all I know, but I was a little startled by it. They say they only want to see work based on fairy tales, which even for fantasy seems a little narrow to me. But like I said, what do I know? Darn little.

heatheringemar
08-30-2007, 08:46 PM
I think they're going for a niche market.

Chicken Warrior
08-30-2007, 10:27 PM
Yup, and that's the way to go when you're that size, often enough. What's the market like for fairy fantasy? I'm not really sure.

EDIT: They are planning to expand, I believe, with horror fantasy and more romance.

David McAfee
09-23-2007, 05:33 AM
Not sure if this has been posted already, but I just checked out their website, www.drollerie.com (http://www.drollerie.com), and there is notice stating they had computer issues and lost all their submissions. They are asking that anyone who subbed to them in the last two months please resubmit their work.

Just thought y'all might wanna know, especially anyone who might fall into the 2 month window.

JeanneTGC
09-23-2007, 05:56 AM
Not sure if this has been posted already, but I just checked out their website, www.drollerie.com (http://www.drollerie.com), and there is notice stating they had computer issues and lost all their submissions. They are asking that anyone who subbed to them in the last two months please resubmit their work.

Just thought y'all might wanna know, especially anyone who might fall into the 2 month window.
Thanks for posting this, David.

dolores haze
09-24-2007, 06:01 PM
Some more info on Drollerie for the interested.

http://dearauthor.com/wordpress/2007/09/23/spotlight-on-drollerie-press/

SusanH-B
09-27-2007, 07:40 AM
This seems to bode well for them: they are getting reviews for their books from Publisher's Weekly, Library Journal, and Boston Globe (according to Amazon.com).


Their books aren't getting reviewed, their author was. Amazon and BN.com quote reviews from PW, Library Journal and the Globe in the description of "Still Life With Devils," but they are reviews of Deborah Grabien's other books. The Globe quote is from a Dec. 03 review of "The Weaver and the Factory Maid."

heatheringemar
10-03-2007, 01:52 AM
I just got an acceptance from them, (yay!) but am waiting on a contract -- they had a total computer meltdown a while back, and are still busy siphoning their former documents off the old system.

Speaking of the meltdown, they have asked that anyone who had something submitted before, to resubmit.

David McAfee
10-03-2007, 06:25 AM
I just got an acceptance from them, (yay!) but am waiting on a contract -- they had a total computer meltdown a while back, and are still busy siphoning their former documents off the old system.

Speaking of the meltdown, they have asked that anyone who had something submitted before, to resubmit.

Yup.

I posted about that here:http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=78272

David McAfee
10-15-2007, 09:52 PM
I see on their website that their first book, Still Life With Devils, has been reviewed by PW. That's a good thing, right?

Chicken Warrior
10-16-2007, 12:42 AM
Is it their book or their author? Link?

David McAfee
10-16-2007, 12:47 AM
Their Book. Here's the link:

http://www.drolleriepress.com/Interact/

heatheringemar
10-20-2007, 09:05 PM
I've got two stories now with Drollerie Press (newly accepted), and so far I'm very impressed with their level of professionalism and friendliness.

Yes, their books are getting reviews from Publisher's Weekly, Booklist, and Library Journal. As far as I'm aware, their first print release will come out in December.

CaoPaux
10-30-2007, 12:52 AM
Their Book. Here's the link:

http://www.drolleriepress.com/Interact/Specifically: http://drolleriepress.com/Interact/?p=63

Here's the book's Amazon listing: http://www.amazon.com/Still-Life-Devils-Deborah-Grabien/dp/0979808103

But, yes, having PW, etc. at the starting gate is a Very Good Thing.

vadim
11-14-2007, 06:18 AM
Deena is absolutely marvelous. And rare, too. She finds time to discuss things with authors, and not only discuss. She edited my first pages of the novel (!) and she also provided me with some very useful comments and suggestions. The novel was not what she was looking for, but she nevertheless spent her time on working with me and helping with the revisions.

heatheringemar
11-18-2007, 04:11 AM
I agree. Deena is great that way; even if it isn't what she's looking for, she'll tell you exactly why it isn't, and where it went wrong for them.

So far, I'm having a blast working with the team, and I'm looking forward to working with their editors when my stories go through.

And did I mention how very cool their cover art is?? :D

vadim
11-30-2007, 07:02 PM
Congrats on your coming book, Heather!

I asked Deena to edit my first 50 pages and I'm looking forward to working with her. The editor and the writer must be tuned to the same wave otherwise nothing good will come out of it. Although I work in a different genre (it's literary, a combination various genres) Deena is the right editor for me. She pointed at things in my ms. which I myself was not very much satisfied with and her comments and suggestions were exactly what I needed. I'm sure there could be numerous other opinions on the same piece, but, as I said, it's not about who's right and who's wrong. Working with your editor is about sharing the same perspectives on the main aspects of your work.

triceretops
12-28-2007, 07:01 AM
A recent letter from Deena. It seems that the print arm of Drollerie might be slowing down, revamping or halting altogether. I don't know what, but I thought that I would share this info with the board.

I had to decline, since my book sold a week ago to another outfit. But I do like Deena and have exhanged letters with her before.



Dear Chris;

Thank you again for your submission, and for your patience. I'm afraid we've been inundated this quarter and I apologize for our tardy response. We are no longer promising print publication for all works we accept because we have had so many quality publications--more than we can afford at present--but we are still publishing all works electronically and distributing them through all available electronic channels, including Overdrive, the distributor to libraries. I will, however, discuss the possibility of print publication with you and work toward that goal if I accept your novel for publication. If you're interested in publication under those conditions, I would be pleased to read the rest of Planet Janitor.

Deena

heatheringemar
02-03-2008, 08:21 PM
Slowing down, yes, but they are still a print publisher. They needed to be more selective about the works going to print because of the overwhelming amount of submissions they were getting, and the fact that being a fledgeling company, they just couldn't afford to put every one of them in print right away. So, it was a business decision, that I think, in the long run, will do them a lot of good, allowing them space to grow and realize their full potential as a company.

One of my stories, "Accused," just went through edits, and I am pleased with the way they handle things. I can definitely see that the people of Drollerie are taking the time to do things right. :)

Mr. Anonymous
07-09-2008, 08:05 PM
Anything new on them?

heatheringemar
10-16-2008, 07:13 PM
They are currently closed to submissions, until, I believe, January 1.

CaoPaux
12-31-2008, 09:02 PM
Wouldn't call it normal, but such problems are all too common with anthologies, and being a new press just ups the likelihood of delays and confusion, alas.

JamieB
01-09-2009, 06:41 PM
I have had a submission out with them for quite a while. Deanna has been great about getting back to my status inquiries. In October she said it would probably be another month, but I still haven't heard anything. I was checking here to see if anyone else had a submission out for a long time. They may just be very buried at the moment, but I plan to check back with her.

Saskatoonistan
01-09-2009, 08:03 PM
I've had my book "Shade Fright" with them since the end of October and they are buried with stuff - at least that was the word then.

JamieB
01-09-2009, 08:09 PM
I'll have to check back with her. Man, what I would give for one of those covers...

barleybree
01-14-2009, 01:33 AM
Thanks Cao, for your response to my message. Somehow doofas me deleted it! I wanted to say that Deena is wonderful, and although they are up to their eyebrows in submissions, she is very good at responding to questions. I've had a short story with them since last year, (which should be out end of this month in a YA anthology-I hope!) but I'm beginning to understand this is the nature of the market. There are just so many people submitting-especially to new presses.

I think it's also a sign of the times for new press to not be able to promise print right away. I've been working with Lyrical, (Renee is also awesome!) and they seem to have made the same decision.

I think we're lucky though to have such rare people as Deena and Renee out there. We all know how harsh a great number of agents/publishers can be. At least I do! It's so nice to see "business people" who have a heart and really care.

Unimportant
01-14-2009, 01:53 AM
Agreed, JamieB. If I had a novel ms ready I'd submit to them just based on those gorgeous covers.

mrs.trujillo18
02-13-2009, 11:30 PM
Just wanted to hop in here and say they requested my MS this morning. I was checking to see if there were any negative posts on them but I don't see any. :)

JamieB~Who did the artwork that is on your blog? I love it.

Saskatoonistan
03-03-2009, 05:27 PM
EEEK!!!! YAY!!!! EEK!!! HAPPY HAPPY HAPPY!! I just got an offer from Drollerie for my novel Shade Fright!!! HAPPY DANCE!! HAPPY DANCE!!! :):):)

brainstorm77
03-03-2009, 06:02 PM
EEEK!!!! YAY!!!! EEK!!! HAPPY HAPPY HAPPY!! I just got an offer from Drollerie for my novel Shade Fright!!! HAPPY DANCE!! HAPPY DANCE!!! :):):)

Congrats :)

KAP
03-03-2009, 06:07 PM
Congratulatinos, Saskatoonistan.

JulieB
03-03-2009, 06:28 PM
Great news!

Saskatoonistan
03-03-2009, 08:00 PM
Thanks all, I am fairly bouncing off the walls here. :)

Marva
03-04-2009, 06:15 AM
Thanks all, I am fairly bouncing off the walls here. :)
I'll bet you are! Great news! Keep us all posted.
:D

cdoctor13
03-05-2009, 06:02 PM
I just submitted to Drollerie Press a few days ago. The waiting is the hardest part.

yanallefish
05-18-2009, 07:05 PM
Waiting difficult, yeah. I've a sub out with them too, for a couple months, and man do I have my arthritic fingers crossed! So far I've had one story in an anthology with them.

Jess

TamMac
05-19-2009, 04:12 AM
Bah, waiting stinks. And, I hate to say that I think Drollerie have been really busy. They took a book of mine in early spring and I think they mentioned they were hiring new staff on to help with the overload.

heatheringemar
06-08-2009, 08:59 AM
I just had my stories come out in two different anthologies with them, "StereoOpticon" and "Bump in the Night" and must say their ebook presentation/layout/etc is the snazziest I've seen.

I remain very impressed with the quality and care that goes into producing works at Drollerie. :)

Senta
06-20-2009, 07:07 PM
Drollerie just published a new collection 'Needles & Bones' of 'literary' and 'surreal' stories. It is so difficult to find a publisher - any kind of publisher - for 'literary' and 'surreal' (not even sure I would call it that, but out of the ordinary) and I am so happy because my story 'Heart of the Desert' is in it. Under my new pseudonym of Nyla Nox!
I worked on that story for many years and tried to get it published for many more years.
The cover, as always with Drollerie, is beautiful, and all the stories are a little unusual.
I hope this develops into a market for 'unusual' and 'literary'.
Great stuff.

Wallaceka
07-05-2009, 07:34 PM
My first book, Assiniboin Girl, was just released by Drollerie. They are indeed a joy to work with and my cover art is lovely. I can't say enough about them!

cdoctor13
07-06-2009, 02:14 AM
I'm on my fourth month of waiting. I assume it'll be a couple more.

Sydewinder
08-04-2009, 08:34 AM
What's the word on these guys? Their website looks great. many of their covers are brilliant (The Chocolatier’s Wife---wow! I would buy that book just by the cover!) but I can't tell if they do any print. I don’t mind submitting to an E-publisher, but I want them to at least do POD as well. I really really want to have my book in my hands. without that, it just doesnt feel...published. I know it's silly.

Does anyone have any experience with in this regard?

MissLadyRae
08-09-2009, 05:23 PM
As a reader I'm a lover of Drollerie Books and as an author, I find Deena very professional and quick to answer any questions. I also love their authors chats, always a blast.

I wondered about the print status as well and just did a quick check. I notice they have a few books coming up later this year, including some I had bought earlier (which I'm really jazzed about). Meredith Holmes' Unseelie, Michael Boatman's (Yes, Spin City's Michael Boatman) Revenent Road and one of Joely Sue Burkhart's books.

Drollerie's Amazon list (http://www.amazon.com/gp/search/ref=sr_adv_b/?search-alias=stripbooks&unfiltered=1&field-keywords=&field-author=&field-title=&field-isbn=&field-publisher=Drollerie+Press&node=&url=&field-feature_browse-bin=&field-binding_browse-bin=&field-subject=&field-language=&field-dateop=&field-datemod=&field-dateyear=&sort=relevancerank&Adv-Srch-Books-Submit.x=15&Adv-Srch-Books-Submit.y=7)

I think like any small press using POD, they're moving the big sellers to print about a year after they release in ebook if my estimates are correct.

Another good thing with DP is they have a few audio contracts as well so some of their books are already in audio format through Audible and the UK's Action Audio.

This is a great company I think. I'd love to be pubbed by them. :-)

cdoctor13
08-09-2009, 07:35 PM
In month five of waiting. Truly, waiting is the hardest part ;)

Harris
08-09-2009, 09:50 PM
A few cold hard facts.

Positives-
-Deena is a very nice person.
-Communication is good.
-Artwork is fabulous.
-Seems like a stable company.


Negatives-
-No distribution.
-Even if scheduled for print, books can be pulled from print list because of pub changes.
-Low sales.
-Constant delays for (fill in latest crisis)
-Editor has taken books (at least two that I know of) already in electronic release and chosen to rewrite them herself before going to print. A writer I know was told and decided that the book shouldn't go to print if those changes were mandatory.
-Edits can be given a day or so before release. That leads to editing errors because of rushed work. That's right, the author received the edits just before the release date and had to hurry to get them back.

mlhernandez
08-10-2009, 06:15 PM
A few cold hard facts.

Positives-
-Deena is a very nice person.
-Communication is good.
-Artwork is fabulous.
-Seems like a stable company.


Negatives-
-No distribution.
-Even if scheduled for print, books can be pulled from print list because of pub changes.
-Low sales.
-Constant delays for (fill in latest crisis)
-Editor has taken books (at least two that I know of) already in electronic release and chosen to rewrite them herself before going to print. A writer I know was told and decided that the book shouldn't go to print if those changes were mandatory.
-Edits can be given a day or so before release. That leads to editing errors because of rushed work. That's right, the author received the edits just before the release date and had to hurry to get them back.

Wow. That last bit about the editing is straight from PA's playbook. Was this just one author? Or? All of the publishers I've worked with have rigid editing standards and set release dates accordingly.

Low sales? As in double digits low?

cdoctor13
08-10-2009, 08:44 PM
Do you have any proof for these accusations? I'm not saying you are wrong, but I'd like to see something to back your claims up.

mlhernandez
08-10-2009, 09:32 PM
Do you have any proof for these accusations? I'm not saying you are wrong, but I'd like to see something to back your claims up.


For what it's worth, I was privately contacted by two authors after my last post. They had similar complaints so...

cdoctor13
08-10-2009, 10:04 PM
They should email Writer Beware.
beware@sfwa.org

joelysue
08-10-2009, 10:25 PM
A few cold hard facts.
Negatives-
-No distribution.
-Even if scheduled for print, books can be pulled from print list because of pub changes.
-Low sales.
-Constant delays for (fill in latest crisis)
-Editor has taken books (at least two that I know of) already in electronic release and chosen to rewrite them herself before going to print. A writer I know was told and decided that the book shouldn't go to print if those changes were mandatory.
-Edits can be given a day or so before release. That leads to editing errors because of rushed work. That's right, the author received the edits just before the release date and had to hurry to get them back.

I've been with Drollerie since 2007 and I've seen the press grow from just a few stories to dozens. Yes, there have been delays and rocky patches. Growth is not always easy to accommodate. However, communication has always been open and honest. Distribution is growing--most of our works are available on Fictionwise, more formats are available including audio--and my sales have consistently gone up each quarter, although not stellar by any means. Drollerie is small, yes, but still growing.

I've had several stories of various lengths edited by Deena and another editor and I've never had my work rewritten. I've gone through several edit passes on the longer stories, and only quick passes through the shorter ones, but I've never felt like nothing but my best work has resulted. We have run close to the release date on final proofs, but I've always had plenty of time to do my detailed edits.

Deena's terrific to work with. If anything, my only complaint would be that Drollerie needs about a dozen of her. There have been staffing issues and the transitions haven't always been seamless, but she works tirelessly to get out our best work possible with gorgeous art inside and out.

Joely

veinglory
08-10-2009, 10:30 PM
The proof of the pudding is in the sales figures. If anyone wants to send their figures to me confidentially I can post an anonymised average at ERECsite.com (http://www.erecsite.com/SALES.html)in the planned new "other genres" area (most of the current data is for erotic romance).

LMILLER111
08-12-2009, 07:43 AM
Hi There,

I hesitate to get involved in this discussion because I'm more of a watcher... But I have done some research on Drollerie Press so I thought I’d share what I learned. I want to start by saying that I’m not a Drollerie author. I’ve submitted a couple manuscripts to them, and have been politely rejected each time.

For starters, IMO Drollerie Press is head and shoulders above 99% of the POD/eBook publishers out there and very very legit.

What does every thread here on AW tell authors about finding a good indie-publisher? They say: If they’re small, they should keep their books in a niche market (a sign that they are serious about making a name for themselves); be sure they professionally edit the work; invest in good cover art; make their books fully returnable; provide industry discounts to retailers; discounts to libraries; provide FREE author copies; and send out ARC’s.
----guess what… Drollerie does all of these things!

They’re small, I acknowledge that. When I was looking into them for my first submission, I tracked down a few of their authors and asked them about their experience - every one of them had brilliant things to say. I asked about sales - some said they had only managed to sell books in the double digits, while others said they sold hundreds of copies in the first week. (I admit I have no way of verifying these figures but I‘d say, if that‘s true, it‘s fairly typical of a eBook publisher…isn’t it?).

As for books going to print: It is my understanding that all their books are intended to go to print-book and audio-book, however, they wait for the eBook sales to hit a certain figure ($300.00 unless I’m mistaken--if I am mistaken, I‘m not off by much). I believe this is a gauge used to see how successful the book might be. It would be nice to get more information about this.

Now, I will concur that in terms of print distribution it seems they don’t have much. They do utilize several distribution sites for eBooks though. I would love to see them get their books in stores. The fact that they provide discounts and returns is a big step to that end.

I would love to see what the actual sales figures are for Drollerie books, and if someone compiles thoes figures please put them here or a link to where they are. But I really think that Drollerie is in the game for the long haul and you’d be lucky to have them accept your work. They’re small, they aren’t getting ahead of themselves and in time I bet you‘ll see their books on shelves. (I hope so, anyway)

This is my two cents - I’d like to hear from more Drollerie authors. If there is any word on plans for distribution I’d love to hear that too.

Sydewinder
08-13-2009, 08:21 PM
Thanks for adding to the discussion, Lisa. Sorry to hear about your rejections. Iíve heard that Drollerie is highly selective with their submissions (acceptance will taste all the more sweet because of that, I bet :) ).

Iím not sure about that $300.00 benchmark with e-book sales either. But it seems like a low benchmark, which is a good thing for people who want their books turned into physical entities. I wonder how many of Drollerieís books are in print right now. If 300.00 is the benchmark (that would translate into sales of about 60-70 copies), it might say something about their sales if only a few of their books are in print. Of course it could be related to other factors (like 300.00 refers to net earnings after cost and author royalty so that 60-70 sales I mentioned before could be closer to 180-210...or more)so I best not jump to conclusions.

The fact that they do industry discounts and returns is a huge plus for me. I think not having returns or discounts is the major obstacle keeping small publishers off of physical bookshelves (that and marketing of course). No book seller is going to want to shelve books that might not sell and cant be returned. But their not going to shelve a book they donít know exists either.

Just my opinion, but I think for a company like Drollerie, having their authors do book-signings would be a good way to get more of their books onto shelves. I know that, in general, book signings do little to increase sales but for a good small publisher, having their authors get out there and meet-and-greet/hold signings might just have that vendor looking more closely at the next Drollerie book that comes available. Plus they clearly donít skimp out on the cover art!

Good luck with your next submission.

LMILLER111
08-25-2009, 11:38 PM
thanks for the welcome :)
I just heard back re my latest submission to Drollerie.... another "R". What can I say, I really want one of those covers LOL. I did get a full request from another pub though so don’t feel bad for me. I just wanted to update the thread. When I'm waitin to hear from an agent or publisher re one of my submissions I stalk those threads like nothing-else and really appreciate it when people write an update about the status. Time for me to start doing the same.

Best of luck to all you ppl still waiting on submissions. please update us if you hear anything.

cdoctor13
08-26-2009, 03:27 AM
I finally had to email them to get a response, after waiting since March. Apparently my rejection email got lost in the shuffle. They also said they are only through April's submissions right now.

Marva
08-26-2009, 03:38 AM
I would have loved to be published by Drollerie. Unfortunately, I can't wait around for months for a reply. I have to move on.

Sydewinder
08-29-2009, 06:35 AM
They accept multiple submissions don't they? pretty sure they do.

victoriastrauss
08-31-2009, 08:08 PM
Just to note: Drollerie has more than one version of its contract, depending on what rights it wants. The electronic/print contract I saw recently pays royalties on net profits--the publisher's actual cash receipts, less distribution channel fees, printing costs, ISBN, review copies, author copies, and returns. A net profit royalty clause--which can reduce the author's royalty to a pittance--is definitely something to beware of in a publishing contract.

The electronic-only contract I saw pays royalties on the publisher's net income. This is fair for a small press.

The threshold for going to print is publisher profit of $250 within the first six months.

- Victoria

Sydewinder
08-31-2009, 10:23 PM
Thanks for the information, Victoria. Could you clarify something for me? Is it not typical of small presses to have the net earnings clause in their contracts? Are you aware of some solid ebook/pod publishers who do not use this clause (I'd love to add them to my list if you do)? It was my understanding, (and keep in mind that I am new and likely don’t know) that only the Big guys (mass producers) paid royalties based solely on book retail price (though they too consider returns and distributor discounts, don't they?).

I have a submission with Drollerie right now and everything I’ve heard so far has been great. But I just want to cross those T’s and dot those I’s before the contract comes (LOL--optimistic fingers crossed)

veinglory
08-31-2009, 10:42 PM
e/POD typically do not pay on net, they pay a percentage of cover with specific language relating to how the 50% paid to distibutors is accounted for. That would apply to all of the major romance epublishers I am aware of--Samhain, Loose Id etc.

Sydewinder
08-31-2009, 11:23 PM
that's really good to know. Since their e-pub contract is good, I wonder if they are open to negotiations on their print contract. Any drollerie authors care to weigh in?

victoriastrauss
09-01-2009, 08:42 PM
There's a big difference between paying royalties on the publisher's net income or cash receipts (the money the publisher actually gets for the book--usually, list price less wholesalers' and retailers' discounts and any distribution fees) and paying royalties on the publisher's net profit (the money the publisher actually gets for the book less a menu of additional expenses involved in printing and promoting the book).

Paying royalties on net income reduces your royalty from what it would be if paid on list price, but in a straightforward and predictable way. Paying royalties on net profit, on the other hand, reduces your royalties much more. Not only will you have no idea what you will be getting, because you'll never know exactly what will be deducted, the publisher could theoretically manipulate your royalty down to zero (this is also known as "Hollywood accounting"). Even if the publisher doesn't do that, you'll get way less than you would if the publisher paid on net income.

Paying on net income is pretty common among small print publishers. Paying on net profit, on the other hand, is not common and is a MAJOR contract red flag.

- Victoria

foreverstamp
09-03-2009, 02:40 AM
Hi -- I've been lurking these parts for months now. registered so that I could share the news with this thread. I'm Just a bit excited (though it is premature). Ms Fisher has requested a full from my partial. Of course I know a full doesnt mean publication but a girl's gotta dream right? lol- - will keep ya posted

anyone have stats on the wait is for a full? I waited 4 weeks on the partial.

LMILLER111
09-03-2009, 07:41 PM
foreverstamp:hooray:! that's good news. prepare yourself for a wait. But then again, you didnít have to wait too long on the partial so maybe Deena liked your stuff. Keep us informed, I hope your work gets accepted, that would be great news. which imprint are you going for?

ios
09-18-2009, 02:48 AM
Hi all, I'm a newbie. But I've had an acceptance on a novelette recently with them. I submitted it I believe the last day of Feb and heard back early August, I believe.

foreverstamp
09-18-2009, 04:57 AM
Hi all, I'm a newbie. But I've had an acceptance on a novelette recently with them. I submitted it I believe the last day of Feb and heard back early August, I believe.


:hooray:
That's awesome news! congratulations.

ios
09-20-2009, 07:47 PM
Thanks, foreverstamp. If it interests people, I'll keep you all updated on how the process goes.

Jodi

CheekyWench
11-30-2009, 06:16 AM
Has anyone had any other (recent) experience with Drollerie? I see they're closed for submissions currently. Anyone have any clue when they may be opening back up?

thx.

CheekyWench
12-04-2009, 09:37 PM
Has anyone had any other (recent) experience with Drollerie? I see they're closed for submissions currently. Anyone have any clue when they may be opening back up?

thx.
No one?

DLS
12-07-2009, 03:18 AM
They're still closed to general submissions, but they are looking for contributions to three anthology projects. Two of them close on January 5th.

http://drolleriepress.com/drollerie/submit/open-anthologies/

CheekyWench
12-07-2009, 03:30 AM
Thanks! I was hoping someone might know when or if they're opening up for novel submissions any time soon. :D

nash
01-23-2010, 12:06 AM
Cheekywench (love the name btw),

I'd like to know when submissions open up too. I've been haunting their website for a while now because I have a novelette I'd love to have placed with them.

Waiting is hard.

The Grump
01-23-2010, 09:02 PM
Waiting is always hard, even when you expect an ejection.

I've had a query into them for what seems forever.

dolores haze
04-22-2010, 05:55 PM
Drollerie will be hosting Coyote Con - a digital writer's conference, May 1-31, 2010. Details here. (http://coyotecon.com/)

BarbaraSheridan
04-22-2010, 08:33 PM
Drollerie will be hosting Coyote Con - a digital writer's conference, May 1-31, 2010. Details here. (http://coyotecon.com/)

Thanks for posting this. It looks pretty cool.

Mr. Anonymous
07-02-2010, 05:45 AM
They are open to submissions now.

ixchel
07-17-2010, 05:00 AM
Does anyone know anything about Drollerie Press?

eqb
07-17-2010, 05:05 AM
<snip>

(A mod will undoubtedly come along and merge these threads.)

thothguard51
07-17-2010, 05:06 AM
Damn, slow on the trigger again...

What eqb said...

MartinD
09-18-2010, 02:42 AM
Hi all,

Any word on response time from this publisher? Has it improved at all?

PhoebeNorth
09-18-2010, 04:22 AM
Hi all,

Any word on response time from this publisher? Has it improved at all?

I just got a response from them after something in the ballpark of a year. I submitted for an anthology, didn't hear, signed off on them--then got an offer to publish the story as a standalone last week. I'm waiting to see if they'll accept an edited version before moving forward.

So yay! But, yeah, it did take awhile.

nkkingston
09-18-2010, 09:02 PM
They had a massive computer failure (http://drolleriepress.com/administrivia/dp-status/) a couple of months back and then issues with brownouts during the summer. They've reopened to submissions since then, but if you submitted a while back you might want to drop them a line in case. I've found them pretty prompt about replying to questions.

A.P.M.
10-14-2010, 03:16 PM
I submitted a query about a month ago and just got a full request from these guys, so they seem to be back up.

I'd love to know their sales figures, and how they compare to other small presses.

MumblingSage
10-14-2010, 11:14 PM
My new friend the Sales Rank Express (http://www.salesrankexpress.com/) shows rankings from 133,000-75,000 in Kindle: Paid. The ones with ratings have pretty high ones, though the same names pop up repeatedly for reviewers (not necessarily suspicious; they could just be fans).
My sister has a short story coming out in one of their anthologies; I'll ask her opinion on how things go in a few months. Someday I should try to convince her to join AW, but she barely has the time...

A.P.M.
10-15-2010, 01:51 AM
Judging from that site, it seems their sales are pretty low on average-high numbers imply poor sales, or am I reading that wrong?

MumblingSage
10-15-2010, 07:25 PM
Judging from that site, it seems their sales are pretty low on average-high numbers imply poor sales, or am I reading that wrong?

Allowing me a moment to untangle some negatives: no, you are not reading that wrong. High numbers imply lower sales than low figures. I'm not certain how high a number has to be in the Kindle department before it's considered a mark of poor sales.

michael_b
10-15-2010, 07:44 PM
Allowing me a moment to untangle some negatives: no, you are not reading that wrong. High numbers imply lower sales than low figures. I'm not certain how high a number has to be in the Kindle department before it's considered a mark of poor sales.

It would depend on how many books they have in the kindle store. If they have more than a million, then those numbers aren't too horrid. If they only have say, 250,000 then the numbers aren't as good.

On the main Amazon site books in the range shown would be considered okay sales wise as there are over 2 million books listed--as I recall--on Amazon.

Balthane
11-03-2010, 04:02 PM
My book recently got accepted in one of their imprints. I'm excited.

MumblingSage
11-04-2010, 05:44 AM
My book recently got accepted in one of their imprints. I'm excited.

Congratulations! I'd (and I'm sure others would too, I just feel uncomfortable mumbling for anyone but myself) love to hear anything you have to share about your experience as time goes on.

victoriastrauss
11-04-2010, 07:11 PM
I'm curious about whether Drollerie still offers contracts that pay royalties on net profit (http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showpost.php?p=3990850&postcount=82), as they were doing about a year ago. (Paying on net profit is not good, as it can reduce royalties to a pittance.)

- Victoria

Balthane
11-05-2010, 09:29 PM
Thanks for the congratulations. :) I don't mind sharing about my experience when I can.

Marva
11-06-2010, 04:19 AM
Small presses such as Drollerie are the future of publishing. If you don't want to be published, just keep going for that brass ring of agents/Big 6 publishers. I wish you the best.

Congrats, Balthane.

Mr. Anonymous
11-06-2010, 04:26 AM
Thanks for the congratulations. :) I don't mind sharing about my experience when I can.

Hi Balthane,

Would you mind telling us how long your book was under consideration? I sent my submission in literally a day or two after they reopened to submissions (June 30th.) September first we had a short exchange, was told they thought I was next on the first reader's list. October 26th, being over the 16 week min response time they list on their website, I asked for an update on the status. Was told they'd check and get back to me, but they haven't yet...

Unimportant
11-06-2010, 09:55 AM
If you don't want to be published, just keep going for that brass ring of agents/Big 6 publishers. I wish you the best.
While I've nothing against Drollerie and their droolworthy covers, I cannot understand why you equate agents/Big 6 with not being published. Where does that leave Gilloughly, Stacia Kane, eqb, and a host of others on this site? They all went for agents/Big6 and did get published.

I'm all for supporting small/indie presses, but there seems little point in dismissing larger presses or those who set them as their goals -- unless you want to project an attitude of sour grapes.

ghost
11-06-2010, 12:08 PM
Small presses such as Drollerie are the future of publishing. If you don't want to be published, just keep going for that brass ring of agents/Big 6 publishers. I wish you the best.

Congrats, Balthane.

Um, no, it's not.

My first novel is with two of the big six publishers. To suggest that a first time author can't get published by a big house is completely untrue.

dlparker
11-06-2010, 07:20 PM
still offers contracts that pay royalties on net profit (http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showpost.php?p=3990850&postcount=82), as they were doing about a year ago. (Paying on net profit is not good, as it can reduce royalties to a pittance.)

Anyone who has recently signed a contract: I too would like to know the answer to this question, as it was a shock to me. Right now Drollerie is reading one of my stories, so this is a time critical question.

Thank you for pointing this out Victoria, and thanks to anyone who responds.

jennontheisland
11-06-2010, 08:03 PM
It depends on the definition of "net" that is set out (or should be set out) in the contract. If net is just distribution from ebook retailers like Fitctionwise, it's generally considered a little more acceptable than if net covers everything from promotion to paperclips.

Stacia Kane
11-07-2010, 12:53 AM
Small presses such as Drollerie are the future of publishing. If you don't want to be published, just keep going for that brass ring of agents/Big 6 publishers. I wish you the best.

Congrats, Balthane.


Or, if you don't want to do the hard work of making your book strong and commercial enough to EARN that "brass ring," you can just toss your work to any stranger on the internet who builds a website and calls him or herself a publisher*, and then call yourself "published" like that means anything to anyone.

I can legally change my name to "Lady Stacia Kane, Countess of Essex," if I want. That doesn't make me a member of the Royal Family.

Just sayin.'


Sorry, but this is your third rude and dismissive post along those lines here within a day or so, and I'm tired of it. If all you want is to call yourself "published," and it makes you feel better to belittle others and their dreams, goals, and efforts because you apparently have given up on yours, that's fine. But quit acting like other people are morons if they want being published to mean more than "Bob down the street liked my book, so he's going to turn it into a PDF for me and sell it online," and actually want to sell their work to a genuine professional publisher who produces books thousands of people read and buy in stores, and earn more than thirty dollars for it in a year.

We respect our fellow writers here, and that means not telling them they're idiots for wanting to actually accomplish something real. Okay?




*Note: My comment above is not and should not be taken as any sort of comment on the professionalism, reputation, or lack thereof of Drollerie Press. It is emphatically not, and has nothing to do with Drollerie itself, about which I have no real opinion and only vaguely positive thoughts (I don't know much about them).

profen4
11-07-2010, 06:31 AM
I can legally change my name to "Lady Stacia Kane, Countess of Essex," if I want. That doesn't make me a member of the Royal Family.

J

Dang it!!! I guess that explains why they still wont let me through the gates.

Balthane
11-07-2010, 11:12 PM
Thanks for all the positive comments!

Since there seems to be a conversation going about small press vs. big publisher I thought I would just drop my two cents in.

I think both methods are wonderful, depending on your goals. There are many first time writers that get accepted by big publishers, so I think it is possible. It's all about whether you find the right editor who feels passionate about your book and confident that they can sell it.

I also think that small presses are becoming more prominent, especially for niche markets. Many writers nowadays have made comfortable writing lifestyles through small presses. So in the end it depends on what you want in your writing career.

Small presses and big publishers each have their pros and cons depending on what you want.

For me, I just want to write. That's all. Whatever place let's me write and gets my books into reader's hands is the place for me. I love writing, it's the best thing in my life, so big pub, small press, whatever is going to help me do that is enough.

Stacia Kane
11-08-2010, 12:48 AM
I think both methods are wonderful, depending on your goals. There are many first time writers that get accepted by big publishers, so I think it is possible. It's all about whether you find the right editor who feels passionate about your book and confident that they can sell it.

I also think that small presses are becoming more prominent, especially for niche markets. Many writers nowadays have made comfortable writing lifestyles through small presses. So in the end it depends on what you want in your writing career.

Small presses and big publishers each have their pros and cons depending on what you want.




QFT. There's nothing wrong with small presses, not a thing.

But there's also nothing naive or wrong about trying to do something bigger, and writers do that every day.

brainstorm77
11-08-2010, 02:48 AM
QFT. There's nothing wrong with small presses, not a thing.

But there's also nothing naive or wrong about trying to do something bigger, and writers do that every day.

Agreed! That could be a thread all upon its own. :)

victoriastrauss
11-09-2010, 01:11 AM
It depends on the definition of "net" that is set out (or should be set out) in the contract. If net is just distribution from ebook retailers like Fitctionwise, it's generally considered a little more acceptable than if net covers everything from promotion to paperclips.

Net income is fine--that's royalties paid on what the publisher actually receives from retailers and wholesalers (which can be 55% or more off the cover price). Many smaller publishers pay on net income.

Net profit, on the other hand--royalties paid on net income less other costs, like production or publicity expenses--is not fine, because it greatly reduces the amount of money on which royalty percentages are calculated, and allows the publisher to recoup its expenses in part by penalizing its authors.

A contract won't necessarily help you out by saying "net income" or "net profit." It may just say "net"--which means you need to pay careful attention to the portion of the royalties clause where "net" is defined. If there is no definition of "net"--which I've seen in a fair number of contracts from small presses--you need to ask for a definition, otherwise you can't be sure exactly what amount your royalties will be calculated on. And don't rely on verbal representations--get the answer in writing.

- Victoria

Rysta
04-07-2011, 06:27 PM
Has anyone been accepted by Drollerie recently? Because I'm having a load of problems with these people. Not big things, you know, but just a bunch of little things that add up to a red flag.

So, they accepted me in June. I signed the contract and jumped through the hoops. They said my story would be out in December. I didn't hear anything back from them.

Around November, I email them asking if they need my edits. My editor tells me that "oh, I forgot which story was yours" and that she needs the file again. First off, I don't know how you can forget which story was mine when my contact information is in the file and my name is on every page, but sure. Fine. Whatever. I emailed her the file again.

Radio silence. December goes by without a word. January, I email the editor again. I'm told that she was sick the whole month of December and that they're very backlogged.

So I wait some more. March, I email the editor again. I wait two weeks. No reply. So then, I email the submissions address, basically asking what the fuck. I'm told that they lost my story for the second time and somehow, had no way of contacting me about it (nevermind that I put contact information into every email). Could I please send my most recent copy of the file to them?

So I did. Silence for two weeks. Then, I get an email from a 'queenoftheramen' saying that she's my new editor and do I have any questions.

Well, I do want to know what the fuck and why my editor doesn't have a Drollerie email or any kind of professionality, apparently, but that doesn't seem like a nice thing to say.

If they don't publish my story by December 2011, my contract expires and I get my story back. If I terminate the contract before then, I have to pay them a $250 'early termination fee'.

Just... I don't know. Any advice, guys? I feel awful about this.

priceless1
04-07-2011, 06:48 PM
Rysta, chances are that they contract independent editors and would explain the lack of a company email addy. As for forgetting your manuscript twice...there are no words. And after they've treated you so miserably, why would they insist that you pay them to terminate the contract? Haven't they blown the contract already by not getting your book out when it was promised?

And you should feel awful about this. I can't understand how any signed contract could fall between the cracks - unless the company keeps no records and has no idea what's going on. No matter how you slice it, it's achingly unprofessional.

CaoPaux
04-07-2011, 06:49 PM
Yeesh! Sympathies for your frustration, and hope you get it worked out.

Has the "early termination fee" always been part of their contract? I glanced back through the thread and don't see prior mention of it.

nkkingston
04-07-2011, 09:58 PM
Were you dealing with Deena directly? Because she's just gone on ill-health leave, according to the website (http://drolleriepress.com/administrivia/important-announcement/#comments). There was also a crash somewhere around the last year (mentioned on the old site) that wiped a lot of emails from their system. I got in touch with Deena about something else back in February and she said she was glad to hear from me because my emails some months before had disappeared from their system. In combination it would explain both the missing emails and the new editor.

The anthology I'm in has flown past multiple 'coming soon' dates, and I suspected something might be up, so the news didn't surprise me. I'd need to dig my contract out, but off the top of my head the one I signed has an 18 month deadline on publication before the rights revert to the authors, and though there is a termination fee it's within certain time limits and only applies to stories of certain lengths.

(on that note, is anyone else in the 'Crossings' anthology? PM me? I don't think there's anything hugely worth fretting over, considering the recent announcement about Deena, but it'd be good to hear from people in the same position)

Rysta
04-07-2011, 10:33 PM
I was working with Deena, yes, but it still strikes me as odd that things keep getting lost and no one but her has any records of anything.

In my contract, at least, the termination fee doesn't have anything to do with the length of the story. It says:

"The author may at any time after signing this Agreement, request release from the Agreement in writing. The Publisher is not obligated to grant this release. If granted, the Author will be liable for a $250.00 release fee and the Publisher will provide a written notification of release upon receipt of the fee."

I sort of expect there to be long wait times with a good publisher, and I understand how Deena getting sick could cause a lot of problems. But how is it that one person falls ill and the entire communications system crumbles? Are there no written records? Does no one talk to each other or print anything out? How do I keep falling through the cracks like this?

Contract says they've got 18 months to publish after getting the story before the rights revert back to me, so they've got time yet to fart around.

It sucks, but I don't see that there's anything I can do.

nkkingston
04-07-2011, 11:56 PM
It's not the first time they've had comupter problems; I agree they could do with some better back ups and failsafes. The impression I'm getting is that though there are multiple editors for the most part it's been a one-woman show, and as Drollerie's expanded it's become far too much work for one person. Hopefully Deena's illness (may it be brief and easy to recover from!) will cause them to re-evaulate this and spread the load a little more.

MartinD
04-08-2011, 04:15 AM
As a writer, I don't know much about Drollerie...except that I've heard they take forever to respond.

As a reader, I like their stuff.

PhoebeNorth
04-09-2011, 10:32 AM
I don't know if my story with them will help you any. I submitted a short story to their Greek mythology antho in (I believe) September of 2009. I didn't hear anything for a long, long time--one year later, in September of 2010, I received word that Deena had lost my submission, and then found it again, and that she wanted to publish it as a standalone.

In that time, I'd revised the story (in anticipation of sending it to another market!). I asked if she'd be willing to consider revisions, and she said she would. I sent it off.

In December, I received word from Selena Green that she'd taken over the Greek antho and would be moving forward with edits. At this point, I hadn't signed a contract and had been led to believe I was (maybe) being published as a standalone. I told Selena about this, and the revisions I'd sent to Deena. She said she'd be happy to find me space in the antho--which honestly, I preferred--and that she would have Deena send me a contract right away (she did warn me that Deena was having some health problems, which might have been the source for the confusion/lack of contact). I received my contract, and within a few weeks I was doing edits with Selena.

I was very impressed with Selena's editing and her promptness, and the final anthology is just gorgeous, very nicely done. However, I can definitely understand your frustration, and you weren't alone in this. Their website lists Selena as one of the contact people, and I do think it's worth dropping her a line with your concerns. Hopefully she'll be as prompt and responsive with you as she was with me!


Has anyone been accepted by Drollerie recently? Because I'm having a load of problems with these people. Not big things, you know, but just a bunch of little things that add up to a red flag.

So, they accepted me in June. I signed the contract and jumped through the hoops. They said my story would be out in December. I didn't hear anything back from them.

Around November, I email them asking if they need my edits. My editor tells me that "oh, I forgot which story was yours" and that she needs the file again. First off, I don't know how you can forget which story was mine when my contact information is in the file and my name is on every page, but sure. Fine. Whatever. I emailed her the file again.

Radio silence. December goes by without a word. January, I email the editor again. I'm told that she was sick the whole month of December and that they're very backlogged.

So I wait some more. March, I email the editor again. I wait two weeks. No reply. So then, I email the submissions address, basically asking what the fuck. I'm told that they lost my story for the second time and somehow, had no way of contacting me about it (nevermind that I put contact information into every email). Could I please send my most recent copy of the file to them?

So I did. Silence for two weeks. Then, I get an email from a 'queenoftheramen' saying that she's my new editor and do I have any questions.

Well, I do want to know what the fuck and why my editor doesn't have a Drollerie email or any kind of professionality, apparently, but that doesn't seem like a nice thing to say.

If they don't publish my story by December 2011, my contract expires and I get my story back. If I terminate the contract before then, I have to pay them a $250 'early termination fee'.

Just... I don't know. Any advice, guys? I feel awful about this.

Balthane
04-09-2011, 03:56 PM
My novel will be published with Drollerie in their YA imprint - Kettlestitch. So far everything has been going fine with my editor, Emily Jo. All her emails come from a Drollerie address and I talk to her at least once a week. I haven't had any problems with her, suggested edits, or my contract.

I don't know if it's because Kettlestitch is an imprint so a different person is in charge of it, but my experience has been very good and has run incredibly smoothly.

Crafty
04-09-2011, 05:39 PM
Perhaps this is one of those cautionary tales where you have to know the people behind the press, and if it's a one woman show, you need to be prepared for the day when the pub runs into trouble because the person running things becomes too sick to, well, run things.

msfowle
08-10-2011, 06:26 PM
Hey all! So I had sent my story to Drollerie Press, and Selena Green said she loves the idea but my story needed some editing (and she was right.) I edited it, but now they're not only closed to submissions, but the way you submit a story to them is done with an online form instead of a direct email. Problem is I already emailed my "Requested Material" the same way I did before. Unsure whether they even got it or not, I emailed Ms. Green directly to ask if it went through, or if she wanted me to send it right to her. That was at the end of July, and I haven't heard anything back. What's the traditional wait time to hear back about something like this? Or am I just being too impatient?

Rysta
08-11-2011, 02:01 AM
Hey all! So I had sent my story to Drollerie Press, and Selena Green said she loves the idea but my story needed some editing (and she was right.) I edited it, but now they're not only closed to submissions, but the way you submit a story to them is done with an online form instead of a direct email. Problem is I already emailed my "Requested Material" the same way I did before. Unsure whether they even got it or not, I emailed Ms. Green directly to ask if it went through, or if she wanted me to send it right to her. That was at the end of July, and I haven't heard anything back. What's the traditional wait time to hear back about something like this? Or am I just being too impatient?

I think they're very busy right now. I've got a novella in production with them at the moment and my editor suddenly dropped off the face of the internet with no contact or warning. I think Selena's now left picking up a lot of slack, left over from Deena's departure and now from the missing employee.

Though, on the other hand, she's usually really good about replying to emails regardless. If I were you, I'd probably just send the copy straight to her. With her record of amazing!fast replies, I have to think maybe she just hasn't gotten it.




So I did. Silence for two weeks. Then, I get an email from a 'queenoftheramen' saying that she's my new editor and do I have any questions.

Well, I do want to know what the fuck and why my editor doesn't have a Drollerie email or any kind of professionality, apparently, but that doesn't seem like a nice thing to say.




UPDATE: In the spirit of disclosure (as I would have liked to know these things going in) I have an update on my saga, may it not damage the pitiful possibility of my publication further.

I was right. My editor flaked. The warning signs were all there and I should have known better. 'Queenoftheramen' managed to stick it out until it came time for cover-art. Then, she fell off the face of the internet. Didn't hand the appropriate things off to Selena. Didn't reply to any emails. Limbo, and once again, radio silence. Haven't been able to get a word out of her for months now. This hasn't stopped her personal tumblr from updating loads of anime things three times a day, but a job and clients are apparently no longer a priority. Even Selena (whom I had assumed to be her boss) can't get ahold of her.

I feel bad for Selena. She's prompt and professional and I really feel like she tries her hardest with everything. But followed by my accepted manuscript getting lost, not once but twice, 'queenoftheramen' has left an awful taste in my mouth.

The cover art is really gorgeous, though. Now if only someone will get to see it besides me and the missing ramen queen. :/

Thedrellum
08-11-2011, 06:08 PM
Based on Phoebe's experience, I decided to go to Drollerie's website to check them out, see if they were looking for specific stories for anthologies, etc. After being on there a moment, I got slammed with pop-ups and was forcibly redirected to another site that spawned video and sound. I had to ctrl-alt-del my way out to close Firefox.

Anyway, all that's apropos of nothing re: Drollerie as a press, but was pretty annoying and surprising nonetheless.

Maybe they've been hacked?

Keyan
09-10-2011, 02:14 PM
There's some information on another writer group that says Selena Green sent out a letter explaining she's resigning because Deena has gone radio-silent on her, she doesn't know what the financial situation is or if they even have money to buy ISDNs. It sounded very much like an implosion.

BarbaraSheridan
09-10-2011, 08:16 PM
That silence/illness/mega computer issues/editor flake were a problem as far back as 2007/8 when I subbed there.

nkkingston
09-13-2011, 04:13 PM
I hope there's an official announcement at some point, rather than just letting it filter through the grapevine. I've reached a point where I've stopped asking for info about the Crossings release date - not that they weren't always polite and prompt to reply - because so many "definitely this time" dates have flown by now without a single status update for the authors. The contract expires at the end of this year, and if it's not out then I'm resubbing the story elsewhere. After all, if it sold once it can sell again. I'm disappointed because I love Drollerie's books and I was really looking forward to being a Drollerie author, but if things are falling apart behind the scenes I guess it's better this way.

ios
09-28-2011, 01:47 AM
I recently received the rights to my novella back, upon my own request, since it had been two years since acceptance and it wasn't ready to be published yet and I didn't know when it would. But we parted on good terms; everything handled professionally.

Jodi

nkkingston
09-28-2011, 11:27 AM
I got the email announcement about Sandra's leave of absence last week, and Selena returned the rights to my story in the Crossings anthology a couple of days ago.

I have to admit, with a short story in an anthology I wasn't exactly expecting to make money off it anyway, but I had been looking forward to adding Drollerie to my list of credits because as a reader I've always loved their stuff. I hope things get sorted out internally at some point and they get back on track.

EASchechter
10-09-2011, 01:33 AM
I just now heard something about Drollerie closing up shop. I'm trying to get confirmation. Anyone else heard this?

Alan Yee
10-09-2011, 03:22 AM
I just now heard something about Drollerie closing up shop. I'm trying to get confirmation. Anyone else heard this?

That's what I heard today from a friend on LiveJournal. She's been published with them before the co-editor of one of their recent anthologies. Her wording seemed to indicate it was a for-sure closing up shop and not just speculation of impending doom, which has been going on for some time now.

EASchechter
10-09-2011, 06:42 PM
That's what I heard today from a friend on LiveJournal. She's been published with them before the co-editor of one of their recent anthologies. Her wording seemed to indicate it was a for-sure closing up shop and not just speculation of impending doom, which has been going on for some time now.

I think you may have heard it from the same person I did.

Alan Yee
10-09-2011, 09:39 PM
I think you may have heard it from the same person I did.

Very likely. :) Hopefully there's a more official confirmation so that their published authors and authors under contract aren't left hanging.

Alan Yee
10-22-2011, 11:44 AM
It's official now: According to the owner, Deena Fisher, Drollerie Press is now closed (http://drolleriepress.com/news-and-commentary/closure-of-drollerie-press/). It looks like she's doing a good job of making sure the books are taken down from vendors and third-party websites and that the writers have their books' rights reverted back to them.

IceCreamEmpress
10-22-2011, 09:33 PM
I applaud Ms. Fisher for being responsible about closing up shop, and wish her all the best.

nkkingston
10-25-2011, 01:18 PM
I'll miss this press. Loved their output.

triceretops
10-25-2011, 10:30 PM
I will miss this press, too. Very sad situation here for all.

Tri

Rysta
10-28-2011, 07:12 PM
I love how I found out they were closed through Duotrope. Not, you know, through my publisher.


It's very sad that Deena is so sick she can't do what she loves.

That said, my book was out for one month--one--before they closed up shop. Why did they go ahead with it? She had to know that she wouldn't be able to keep this up.

Frankly, I'm angry because now I've lost first publication rights. I can't ever sell my book for the first time again. Probably, this book will never be published again.

So thanks. Thanks for that.

I still haven't gotten my rights back, either.

nkkingston
11-02-2011, 06:51 PM
A book that's good enough to be published once is good enough to be published twice. This isn't the same kind of situation as trying to republish a self-published book - your potential market is largely untapped. Most publishers will respect that in a situation like this.

I would say, if you haven't heard from them yet maybe drop them a line and ask about when your rights are likely to be returned. I get the impression with most authors they've been pretty prompt (the rights to the story I had in one of their anthologies were returned before they closed up shop) and I'd be concerned that you've slipped through a crack somewhere.