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torrentwaters
06-12-2007, 12:16 AM
I'm try to get info on the publishing company Red Rose. Can anyone help?

James D. Macdonald
06-12-2007, 01:20 AM
These guys? http://www.redrosepublishing.com/

They look like a e-pub specializing in romance/erotica. No idea what lengths they're looking for (the guidelines don't say), and the links to their catalog don't seem to be working.

How did you hear about this publisher and what attracts you to them?

torrentwaters
06-12-2007, 01:43 AM
These guys? http://www.redrosepublishing.com/

They look like a e-pub specializing in romance/erotica. No idea what lengths they're looking for (the guidelines don't say), and the links to their catalog don't seem to be working.

How did you hear about this publisher and what attracts you to them?

Someone who works for them requested one of my ms. I'd like to know more before I signed my contract, thats all.

herdon
06-12-2007, 04:53 AM
Someone who works for them requested one of my ms. I'd like to know more before I signed my contract, thats all.

They requested your ms. without you querying them?

Wendi
06-14-2007, 06:49 AM
Yes it was me as I had read your story and did not know if it was at a publisher or not. It is a terrific story! Red Rose Publishing is taking submissions of all genre romance and erotic as well. We are opening our doors in July for sales.

If interested I can post the submissions guidelines as well as royalities are 40% for sales of ebooks up to 300, over 301 to 500 is 45% while over 501 is 50%. THere are no fees for any of the sales off the site and it is straight % off down load price while the sales from distributor are net, what money the publisher gets from the distributors is divided as stated above.

If you would like more information I would be more than happy to provide it. I believe I have spoken to the orginal poster to answer their questions.

Take care and have a great day!

Wendi

lolaflick
11-06-2008, 08:33 AM
has gone bankrupt?
Red Rose™ Publishing's site is currently unavailable due to maintenance.

It should be restored soon.

Thank you for your patience and sorry for the inconvenience.

~ Webmistress

caromora
11-06-2008, 09:08 AM
I've seen that message on their site before, usually late at night (US EST), when I presume they're updating. The site always comes back just fine. Whether they're having problems, I don't know, but the website message isn't a sign of them.

CaoPaux
11-10-2008, 08:58 PM
E.g., there's a bar across the top of their page today:
The store will be unavailable 10 November starting at 11:40pm EST due to scheduled maintenance. We apologize for the inconvenience and thank you for your patience.

Where did you hear they were having problems/going bankrupt?

kimsmith
11-29-2008, 08:42 AM
I am an author for RRP. They are NOT going bankrupt. That is just a notice that they are doing scheduled maintenance. In fact, many of the top selling authors are going to print.

RochelleWeber
12-17-2008, 04:23 AM
You will notice that the Red Rose website is usually not available on two Wednesday nights/Thursday mornings a month. That's when the Web Mistress updates the site and posts the new releases--both e-book and print. I both edit for Red Rose and am a Red Rose author, and I'm quite happy here. Red Rose is not in financial trouble and is the most professional publishing house I've worked with in something like three years of experience in the e-book industry, both as an editor and as an author. And now we're going to print, as well. My book is currently going through another round of edits so that it will be completely polished when it comes out in print early next year. Red Rose is growing, not shrinking and it's exciting to be part of that growth.

Kensington
03-12-2010, 10:16 AM
Does anyone have any information about this publisher?

http://redrosepublishing.com/bookstore/

para
03-12-2010, 02:53 PM
There's already a thread for this: <snipped>

There's the entry from piers anthony - http://www.hipiers.com/publishing.html

RED ROSE PUBLISHING - www.redrosepublishing.com/. Started by Wendi Felter, who was booted from Mardi Gras. Opinions about her are highly mixed, positive and negative; now we'll see how she does on her own. Sliding scale for royalties: 40% first 300, 45% next 200, 50% above 500. They are seeking all variations of Romance and Erotic Romance, with the usual restrictions. Authors must be 18 or older. ... <snipped> ... January 2010 update: Even at that rate, they have a backlog of a year. They are reorganizing following the loss of their Lead Content Editor (maternity), and things are slow, with some reports months late. I'd say avoid this publisher until they catch up. February 2010 update: negative reports continue, and sales appear to be low. They have been called an author mill instead of a quality publisher. There is also a protest about a $100 termination fee, especially when it is the publisher at fault. The theory is that the publisher invests this much setting up for a novel, but if the publisher then does not perform, I suspect that fee should be forfeited. It seems to take a year to publish an ebook. Yet the publisher does seem to be trying to catch up on the backlog, and says it paid out more than $75,000 in royalties in the year 2009. I hope to simplify this entry in the future, as it is dragging on.

P&E has them as not recommended

the erec list also has a listing: http://www.erecsite.com/PLIST.html

[28 November 2008] Not recommended at Preditors and Editors due in part to a report of non-payment
[30 November 2008] Reports of communication difficulties from more recently signed authors.
[15 December 2008] I have received many positive reports from authors, but also a few mixed reports. However there seem to be no serious issues and it seems some communications glitches that had been occuring are now no longer a problem.
[23 Sept] Reports of a kill fee and other problems.

Kensington
03-12-2010, 09:33 PM
Thanks so much for this. It looks like a publisher to avoid. BTW, is there any way you can check and see how many copies of your book have been sold. I mean an ebook that's up on fictionwise and those sort of sites? Or, is only the publisher privy to that info?

Kensington
03-13-2010, 08:47 AM
RRP is taking a whole year from acceptance to get an ebook up on their site. This long delay should be spelt out in their contract. They are also releasing about twenty new titles every month, and charging a two hundred dollar kill fee, if an author wants out. It sounds more like a vanity to me. Not interested in sales, but just in getting as many titles as they can up on their site, and then making their cash from the kill fee.

Sugertime
03-20-2010, 12:44 AM
The Red Rose contract is 11 pages long. If anyone is interested in any specific clauses I'll post them here. I've noticed that the more disreputable the publisher, the longer the contract, and RR doesn't disappoint. :-) Here is the kill fee clause.

A. The Contract will be for three (3) years from the date of signing of contract, and may be renewed by mutual consent of the Author and the Publisher. Unless notification is received in writing sixty (60) days in advance of expiration by traceable delivery service, certified mail notice or other receipted mail, contract will renew automatically. Upon renewal of the contract the royalty will remain the same, for example if it was 45% or 50% the royalty will remain the same.

B. Author may petition Publisher to terminate contract at any time but will be responsible for production costs for applicable cover art and editors, including Publishers initial investment a one hundred dollar minimum is the cost at the time of this contract. $50 for the cover art and $50 for the editors if pulled before published but after a cover and editing has been done. After publication there must be a 90 day request for termination letter received by traceable mail, registered, etc., if the book has been out more than 30 days equaling a total of 120 day minimum, with no cost incurred to the author.

C. Upon termination of the Contract, the Publisher retains the right to sell or dispose of any existing stock inventory, but may not produce more. The Author will receive applicable or adjusted royalties on these copies, and all rights will revert to Author.

Maud
03-22-2010, 05:11 PM
Signed a contract with Red Rose for my novella, Confesssions of a Liberal Lover, and was advised that they had a backlog. These things happen and I was not upset. Although, I realized my book wasn't the greatest fit for their catalogue (comedic chick-lit) I have no complaints so far and it sure beats self-publishing. I tried this with my first novel, The Founding Five, a political thriller. I used i-Universe, which cost me a bundle and the royalties are so small there’s no way I could sell enough copies to recover my costs.

Just finished working with the content editor RRP assigned. He was really great and worked hard to help me improve the book. I have a release date now of May 2010. Wendi has made it clear to all authors that the book must sell at least 100 copies before a print edition will be released. This seems more than fair and I believe that it really is up to the author to get involved in the marketing process.

Richard White
03-22-2010, 05:39 PM
. . . I believe that it really is up to the author to get involved in the marketing process.

By marketing process, do you mean promotions?

Authors are usually pretty ineffective when it comes to marketing. Authors can set up web sites, do social networking, etc., but that's all promotion. It doesn't do any good if the book is not available where people can find it. Authors can't contact every store in America (in the case of a print book), but publishers can and do, via their sales staff or they coordinate with other cooperatives to market multiple publishers via catalogs. That's marketing.

Publishers should responsible for marketing the book. If, after all, they're really publishing it, they have a vested monetary interest in recouping their outlay. If they're just "making it available" or simply "printing it", then that's not really publishing.

The more the publisher markets a book, the faster the publisher repays themselves for the money they've invested in the book for cover art, editing, formatting, maintaining their servers (in the case of e-books), overhead, etc.

If they leave it strictly up to the author to sell their books, then the publisher is abrogating their responsibilities to the author, in my opinion.

Momento Mori
03-22-2010, 06:02 PM
Hi, Maud, and welcome to AW.


Maud:
I have a release date now of May 2010. Wendi has made it clear to all authors that the book must sell at least 100 copies before a print edition will be released. This seems more than fair and I believe that it really is up to the author to get involved in the marketing process.

Although authors do need to be more involved in promotions now, they should not be the only ones promoting the book.

Are you able to share what Rose Publishing will be doing to promote your novel?

The reason I ask is because there isn't a lot of information about what Rose Publishing do to promote and market their authors. For example their "review co-ordinator Dahlia" (for whom no credentials are given) apparently automatically submits ebooks to the following for review:


Red Rose Publishing Website:
Sites Red Rose Publishing automatically submits books for review (no particular order):

Mistress Bella Reviews http://mistressbellareviews.blogspot.com/

Romance Junkies - http://www.romancejunkies.com/mainpage.html

Dark Diva Reviews - http://ddrreviews.blogspot.com/

Cataromance Reviews - http://cataromance.com/

Fallen Angels Reviews - http://www.fallenangelreviews.com/

Once upon a Romance - http://www.onceuponaromance.net/

A Romance Review - http://www.aromancereview.com/news/index.php

ParaNormal Romance Reviews - http://www.paranormalromance.org/reviews/

Veiled Secrets Reviews - http://www.veiledsecretsreviews.com/

Coffee Time Romance - http://www.coffeetimeromance.com/reviews.html

Two Lips Reviews - http://www.twolipsreviews.com/content/

Novelspot Reviews - http://novelspot.net/bookreview

Howling Good Books - http://www.howlinggoodbooks.com/

Romance Reviews Today - http://www.romrevtoday.com/

Romance at Heart - http://romanceatheart.com/

Long and Short Reviews - http://www.longandshortreviews.com/LASR/index.htm

Whipped Cream Reviews - http://www.longandshortreviews.com/WC/index.htm

You Gotta Read Reviews - http://yougottareadreviews.blogspot.com/

My web filters won't let me check out all of the sites, but some of them haven't been updated since 2009, which may suggest that the promotions staff are not keeping up to date with appropriate review journals - plus many of those journals won't be appropriate for every manuscript being published by Red Rose, so should not be receiving copies automatically.

MM

pagerette
03-22-2010, 11:57 PM
Promotion is the publisher's job. All the effort in the world will only net an author a few copies more, than if they hadn't done a thing. I'd avoid RRP. Wendi Felter does not impress me as someone who truly cares about the authors, and is doing a good job on their behalf.

Maud
03-23-2010, 05:46 PM
Perhaps I should have used the term promotion instead of marketing. I guess since I was in marketing during my business career, the word is etched in my brain.

Not sure if the generalizations you are making about the futility of authors promoting their books are justfied, but if they are I feel sorry for the hundreds of authors who are working their butts off (particularily self-published authors) doing this through their website, Facebook ads, Google Ad Search, Amazon discussion groups and so many other methods.

As far as making their books available, Wendi announced in January that all Red Rose Publishing Print books will be available via Baker and Taylor so bookstores can order them for readers and signings, etc. As far as e-books, they are available through several on-line sites and in various formats including Amazon's Kindle.

Time will tell if your criticism of RRP is justified. I will post my impressions after I have more experience with them including what they have done to market and promote my novella. So far I am pleased, particularily with the job done by the content editor, and did not find the contract that they are using problematic in any way.

Clearly you do not respect this publisher and appear to dislike Wendi on a personal level. Have you yourself had a bad experience? If not, have you heard from a number of authors complaining about RRP?

Momento Mori
03-23-2010, 05:58 PM
Maud to repeat my question - are you able to share what Red Rose are doing to promote your book?

MM

BenPanced
03-23-2010, 06:09 PM
Clearly you do not respect this publisher and appear to dislike Wendi on a personal level. Have you yourself had a bad experience? If not, have you heard from a number of authors complaining about RRP?
No disrespect is intended or implied, especially when somebody asks questions. If two sites independent of AW have them listed as not recommended, then they must have gotten a few complaints from people; it's not like they pull things out of thin air.

veinglory
03-23-2010, 06:17 PM
Indeed. And those reports are confidential.

DreamWeaver
03-23-2010, 06:50 PM
Not sure if the generalizations you are making about the futility of authors promoting their books are justfied, but if they are I feel sorry for the hundreds of authors who are working their butts off (particularily self-published authors) doing this through their website, Facebook ads, Google Ad Search, Amazon discussion groups and so many other methods. I feel sorry for them, too. To see why, check their sales rankings on Amazon. It's like golf--the higher the number, the worse the performance. For example, a ranking of 10 or less indicates sales of several hundred copies a day. A number in the mid-1,000,000s indicates an average of about one sale a year.

You can find explanations and estimations of Amazon rankings vs. sales many places on the web, so it's good to visit several and judge for yourself. One is here: http://www.rampant-books.com/mgt_amazon_sales_rank.htm


Granted, not all sales are on Amazon--but for POD books mainly available for order on line, it is the major seller right now. Publisher websites don't have the same kind of wide reach, and author promotional efforts often lead to prospective buyers heading to Amazon.

Prospective buyers also come to bookstores, but at least at the one I work at, we can't order them POD books due to discount/returnability issues. So, it's likely those end up at Amazon, also.

Stacia Kane
03-23-2010, 08:26 PM
Not sure if the generalizations you are making about the futility of authors promoting their books are justfied, but if they are I feel sorry for the hundreds of authors who are working their butts off (particularily self-published authors) doing this through their website, Facebook ads, Google Ad Search, Amazon discussion groups and so many other methods.




Speaking as someone who e-published seven(?) novels and several novellas and shorts, I feel those generalizations are completely justified, and they echo an opinion I've expressed many times (which is, again, based on my experience).

I feel particularly sorry for those authors as well. That's why I'm here, recommending that writers submit to the biggest publishers they can; that if they're going to epublish they submit to a house that actually has a name people recognize and a site that attracts readers. That's what really makes the difference; when is the last time you bought a book based on a Facebook ad?

Kensington
03-23-2010, 09:00 PM
When you get right down to it, you'd be as well to self publish -- at least that way you keep control of your title, and know how many copies sell, if any -- rather than tie yourself up for five years with a "publisher" like Red Rose, and have a hefty termination fee hanging over your head like the Sword of Damacles. Ditto for all the other small epublishers. They're a waste of time.

veinglory
03-23-2010, 09:06 PM
There are some outfits I would characterise as small epublishers that I would not categorise as a waste of time.

Ravenwing
03-24-2010, 05:32 AM
My experience with RRP has not been good. In fact, it's been awful. I signed with them back in August of 2009, and my book won't be released until July 2010. No edit or cover art has been done. When I saw the huge line up of "Coming Soons" every month, I tried to get out, but there's a kill fee of some two hundred dollars. And as if that isn't bad enough, this payoff must be sent by registered mail, along with a letter asking for your rights back.

When I continued to press for some kind of resolution Wendi -- who sounds like a hysterical hag -- accused me of harassment! (LOL) I'm going to take another dekko at the contract, no easy task it's about 11 pages long -- ever notice how scammers have overly long contracts? If it has a clause about the publisher terminating the contract if the author refuses to do an edit, etc. I'll be refusing to cooperate, and hoping to get out that way. Either way, I don't intend to be cooperative. It's tit for tat. They give me a hard time, they get it right back again in spades. I don't want my title released by them. I don't want anything to do with them. But I jolly well don't intend to give them as much as a nickel to get out. They're just greedy bums.

Cheers

Stacia Kane
03-24-2010, 08:41 AM
My experience with RRP has not been good. In fact, it's been awful. I signed with them back in August of 2009, and my book won't be released until July 2010. No edit or cover art has been done. When I saw the huge line up of "Coming Soons" every month, I tried to get out, but there's a kill fee of some two hundred dollars. And as if that isn't bad enough, this payoff must be sent by registered mail, along with a letter asking for your rights back. I'm in Canada, and it costs close to twenty dollars to send a registered letter to the US. In other words, they make it as hard for authors as they can. They're an author mill, no doubt about it.

When I continued to press for some kind of resolution Wendi -- who sounds like a hysterical hag -- accused me of harassment! (LOL) I'm going to take another dekko at the contract, no easy task it's about 11 pages long -- ever notice how scammers have overly long contracts? If it has a clause about the publisher terminating the contract if the author refuses to do an edit, etc. I'll be refusing to cooperate, and hoping to get out that way. Either way, I don't intend to be cooperative. It's tit for tat. They give me a hard time, they get it right back again in spades. I don't want my title released by them. I don't want anything to do with them. But I jolly well don't intend to give them as much as a nickel to get out. They're just greedy bums.

Cheers

Oh, dear. I've been almost exactly where you are, and I'm so sorry; it sucks. (In my case there was no kill fee but I'd already invested so much of my own money in promo I figured better to try to recoup at least some of those costs; I didn't end up doing so, but that's why I didn't just cancel the contract right away.)

FWIW you *might* be able to fight the kill fee a bit if you haven't had edits or cover art yet, since at least part of that fee is supposed to cover those things. (Of course, remember, I am NOT a lawyer.) It's worth discussing with them, anyway. If they haven't yet paid for art/artist or editor, they technically (in my not-a-lawyer opinion) shouldn't be able to force you to pay them back for those things. You could email them and just suggest that it might be better for them to let you go now before they've outlaid any cash.

Probably won't work, but it won't hurt to try.

Good luck; again, sorry this happened to you. But next time, please do some serious research before you submit! :poke:

Terie
03-24-2010, 11:12 AM
When I continued to press for some kind of resolution Wendi -- who sounds like a hysterical hag -- accused me of harassment! (LOL) I'm going to take another dekko at the contract, no easy task it's about 11 pages long -- ever notice how scammers have overly long contracts? If it has a clause about the publisher terminating the contract if the author refuses to do an edit, etc.

While we appreciate your frustration, once again you're diving straight into name-calling. A lot of start-up micro-publishers aren't scammers, they're just clueless. The end results of both are equally bad for their authors, but there is still a world of difference in motivation between the scammers and those who are well-intentioned but inexperienced.

Unless you have evidence that an actual scam is being run, it's best not to fling that accusation around quite so blithely.

Stacia Kane
03-24-2010, 11:28 AM
While we appreciate your frustration, once again you're diving straight into name-calling. A lot of start-up micro-publishers aren't scammers, they're just clueless. The end results of both are equally bad for their authors, but there is still a world of difference in motivation between the scammers and those who are well-intentioned but inexperienced.

Unless you have evidence that an actual scam is being run, it's best not to fling that accusation around quite so blithely.


Doh. I breezed right over that part. Yes, again, let's keep the "scammer" accusations and personal comments off the forum, okay?

litgirl
03-24-2010, 04:45 PM
So how fast are e-books generally published (acceptance to publication?) Because 11 months from signing to release would be incredibly fast from a print publisher. (Not just for printing time, but also editing.) I know someone else who signed with them recently, and I don't know when her book is supposed to be released, but she recently got her editorial notes, and they're "real" (ie, not just moving commas but refining some of the structure of the story). Even though she has a really short turnaround time to do the edits in, it's still a time investment on the publisher's part (especially as they have more than one author to do this with, and have to balance their releases so that there's enough for variety but not so many that individual books get lost in the flood).

Small e-book publishers are absolutely not the kind of thing I'm looking for for many of the reasons brought out here, but I don't know that a one-year wait time is one of them? But I know that e-books are different from print, so it's a sincere question about what the expected time lag is between offer and release.

ETA: Ah, I see that you haven't done any edits, either. Now that's frustrating (although again, I don't know the schedule for things like this...)

Ravenwing
03-24-2010, 08:06 PM
Re: the scammer thing

I agree that it's impossible to prove intent. PA, for instance, might have the noblest intentions. Still, if it walks like a duck... :-)

kaitie
03-24-2010, 08:19 PM
PA is obviously a scam and everyone knows it. We have documented proof of it. Hundreds of pages of proof. Even if something might have a trait or two that resembles a scam, it isn't necessarily, and we should avoid using language like that unless we have documented evidence to support it. A kill fee alone is not necessarily proof of a scam, and the point is we need to be careful about bandying words like that around. A bad idea does not necessarily equate with a scam.

Why do I feel like we've already said that a time or three?

pagerette
03-24-2010, 08:21 PM
RED ROSE PUBLISHING - www.redrosepublishing.com/. ... August 2008 update: Another negative report of lost contracts, lost editing, lost release dates, nonresponse. A general impression not of malice but of chronic disorganization. December 2008 update: there was a problem, but it has been resolved. A head was offed. But some artists have not received statements or checks, with little or no response to queries, and there are reports of retaliation. February 2009 update: I received a report saying that Wendi Felter was not booted from Mardi Gras, but that there was a campaign there against her by Teresa Jacobs, who used something like 23 aliases, and Wendi finally cut her losses and left. At Red Rose she hired an Editor in Chief who was not up to the job, had to replace her, and since then things have improved. They are now going to print publication as well as electronic and have been swamped preparing books for print debuts. Another report says Red Rose is doing a good professional job. April 2009 update: But another report of retaliation with enough detail to be persuasive. I omit the detail for that reason. And another positive report from an author. Apparently opinions differ. June 2009 update: Wendi points out that authors can rip off publishers, as well as vice versa, and gave examples. Sometimes she has gone out of her way to help authors, and not had much thanks. Sigh. My normal stance is with authors, but Wendi has a point. September 2009 update: it continues. An author suffered bad editing by an editor who then disappeared without notice. A new editor had problems with both the manuscript and the prior editing, then claimed that requested changes had not been made, when they had been made. That editor, too moved on. In the end, correspondence about the manuscript was ignored, and the book was not published. Finally giving up, the author asked for reversion—and was threatened with contractual breach. In sum: bad editing followed by neglect and a threat. This suggests to me that there are problems that are not being properly addressed. October 2009 update: They have increased to six releases a week. That's a heavy schedule, and there is concern whether it will dilute the sales of individual titles. ...

http://www.hipiers.com/publishing.html#R1

pagerette
03-24-2010, 08:26 PM
Okay, demanding that an author with no edit or cover art done, pay a hundred bucks to get out, when RRP's own contract, states otherwise, sounds downright "scammy" to moi. Ditto for the "traceable" mail thing. According to the RRP contract that's only supposed to be after the book has been published.

"Author may petition Publisher to terminate contract at any time but will be responsible for production costs for applicable cover art and editors, including Publishers initial investment a one hundred dollar minimum is the cost at the time of this contract. $50 for the cover art and $50 for the editors if pulled before published but after a cover and editing has been done. After publication there must be a 90 day request for termination letter received by traceable mail, registered, etc., if the book has been out more than 30 days equaling a total of 120 day minimum, with no cost incurred to the author."

Maud
03-24-2010, 08:28 PM
I am a Newbie on this Board and appreciate those who have posted sharing their views and experiences. Actually I fully understand Amazon rankings since I self-published my first novel, a futuristic political thriller called The Founding Five. It still sells a copy now and then, although overall sales have been very low and the ranking has ranged from 47,000 to 1.4 million over the years. Since I wrote this book, I've learned a great deal and may eventually do a rewrite. I still believe it's a great story, although I realize it needed a lot of work before it was ready to be submitted to agents and publishers. In addition, when I go back and look at my query letters, I am actually embarrassed. Still everyone has to start somewhere.

I tried for three years to find either an agent or publisher for Confessions of a Liberal Lover, but invariably the response came back that they were not interested in novellas only full length novels. That's why I decided to go the e-book route. Two publishers responded to my query, requested the manuscript and offered me a contract. I chose Red Rose for a variety of reasons. Perhaps you are right and there is no hope that the book will be a success, but I still consider this a step up from self-publishing and it has not cost me anything out of my own pocket.

I will be attending an Algonkian Writer Conference in San Francisco in May and taking along my new novel, A Monstrous Game. Hopefully through the conference I will gain additional insights and be able to network with those who can help me find an agent, assuming I receive some confirmation that the book is worthy of publication.

The bottom line, however, is that after twenty-plus years working in a career I hated, I am now doing what I love. It would be nice if many readers could enjoy the fruits of my labor, which would result in my achieving commerical success, but even if I don't, I still consider the time I spend writing a blessing.

Thanks again for sharing.

pagerette
03-24-2010, 08:32 PM
I really feel sorry for a new writer who encounters something like this with his first book. Oh my! It would be enough to put him off writing for good. Even for more seasoned writers, this type of thing leaves a bad taste. Sometimes you just wonder, what with the low returns most of the time, anyway, and all the hassles, what IS the point? Working at Wal Mart would give a better return for one's time and efforts.

Ravenwing
03-24-2010, 08:36 PM
Good luck; again, sorry this happened to you. But next time, please do some serious research before you submit! :poke:

Agreed. Prevention being better than cure.

kaitie
03-24-2010, 08:49 PM
Okay, demanding that an author with no edit or cover art done, pay a hundred bucks to get out, when RRP's own contract, states otherwise, sounds downright "scammy" to moi. Ditto for the "traceable" mail thing. According to the RRP contract that's only supposed to be after the book has been published.

"Author may petition Publisher to terminate contract at any time but will be responsible for production costs for applicable cover art and editors, including Publishers initial investment a one hundred dollar minimum is the cost at the time of this contract. $50 for the cover art and $50 for the editors if pulled before published but after a cover and editing has been done. After publication there must be a 90 day request for termination letter received by traceable mail, registered, etc., if the book has been out more than 30 days equaling a total of 120 day minimum, with no cost incurred to the author."

Okay, the part you just quoted says specifically that the person is paying "after a cover and editing has been done." How does that mean that you have to pay a hundred dollars even if neither are done when the statement in the quoted area says you have to pay if they were done?

I also don't think it's necessarily scammy to say that they want it done by registered mail. Why is that suspicious? Maybe I'm just missing something here, but it sounds to me like a cover your ass clause. I.e., you have confirmation of receipt and then an author can't come saying "Well, I sent you an email," or something like that.

Ravenwing
03-24-2010, 08:59 PM
Okay, the part you just quoted says specifically that the person is paying "after a cover and editing has been done." How does that mean that you have to pay a hundred dollars even if neither are done when the statement in the quoted area says you have to pay if they were done?

.

Beats me. Looks like Wendi saw the opportunity to make a fast buck and went for it.

Ravenwing
03-24-2010, 09:06 PM
PA is obviously a scam and everyone knows it. We have documented proof of it. Hundreds of pages of proof.

It might be *obvious* -- if it walks like a duck, etc. -- but it's still not proven, and by that I mean a conviction in a court of law. And we judge as we find. One full year to get an ebook released is totally unreasonable and unheard of. Then trying to put the bite on for a hundred fast ones, when the RRP contract states the kill fee only applies after editing and artwork have been done...it doesn't look good, now does it? And what possible chance does your title have of making any money when RRP is releasing some 30 new titles a month?

Stacia Kane
03-25-2010, 12:07 AM
It might be *obvious* -- if it walks like a duck, etc. -- but it's still not proven, and by that I mean a conviction in a court of law.

PA admitted under oath in their mediation hearing that their business plan consists of selling authors their own books. This means that any statement/claim they make which implies they want to sell books to readers, or that they do not expect authors to buy their own books, is a lie.

PA also claims on its site that they "want your book, not your money" and they don't charge authors. Plenty of documentation exists that they do in fact charge for editing, "expedited" service, etc.; that they introduce errors into books and then charge for their removal; that their "editing" is in fact nothing more than a Spell-checker; that their books are poor quality; that they lie to authors when, for example, bookstores claim the books are not returnable; and lately, that they have taken orders for books, and charged the authors' credit cards, but have not shipped the books. PA claims to not be a POD but is obviously POD. PA tries to charge authors for the "plates" used to print their books when in fact POD books are digitally printed and there are no plates.




One full year to get an ebook released is totally unreasonable and unheard of.

Well...it's unusual but not entirely unheard of, and not necessarily unreasonable. For a publisher as small as RR, yes, it's a lot harder to swallow. But for the Big Five, it's not at all out of the realm of possibility/acceptability.




Then trying to put the bite on for a hundred fast ones, when the RRP contract states the kill fee only applies after editing and artwork have been done...it doesn't look good, now does it? And what possible chance does your title have of making any money when RRP is releasing some 30 new titles a month?

I agree with you that the trying to force you to reimburse them for expenses they have not in fact incurred is totally unacceptable. I take it that you spoke to them, then, and said since they haven't done edits or a cover yet you expect them to let you out of your contract without the fee, and they said no?

And sadly, it's not the number of titles being released that's the problem. The Big Five release that many or more every month. The problem is RRP has no audience to support that many releases.

Stacia Kane
03-25-2010, 12:51 AM
Ellora's Cave, Samhain, Loose-id, Liquid Silver. Sorry, I guess it's the Big Four, lol. I often see Amber Quill listed as a fifth, though.

Ravenwing
03-25-2010, 12:58 AM
Don't the big four, or five, require a sort of committed romance and a HEA? I don't write that sort of story.

Stacia Kane
03-25-2010, 01:02 AM
Not really, no. EC has its Exotika imprint for non-romance/non-HEA erotica. I'm sure Samhain has something similar, and I can't recall offhand if it's LSB or Loose-id that doesn't generally require them or also has a specific imprint (I did an interview with both a few years back and remember one of them saying they especially liked non-traditional stories. I'm pretty sure it was Loose-id but again, I could be wrong.)

veinglory
03-25-2010, 01:18 AM
They are, however, pretty much on the erotica--romance continuim. So if your work is neither romance nor erotica...

Stacia Kane
03-25-2010, 01:41 AM
True, but EC's Cerridwen imprint accepts non-romance.

Brindle Chase
03-25-2010, 03:25 AM
Ellora's Cave, Samhain, Loose-id, Liquid Silver. Sorry, I guess it's the Big Four, lol. I often see Amber Quill listed as a fifth, though.


Amber Quill is by invitation only, last time I checked, but I concur on the four. Siren/Bookstrand might fit in there, but I haven't been able to confirm solid numbers.

Kensington
03-25-2010, 05:03 AM
Amber Quill is by invitation only, last time I checked, but I concur on the four. Siren/Bookstrand might fit in there, but I haven't been able to confirm solid numbers.

I have one title with them. My royalties are about sixty dollars, every quarter. But I'm not doing any promoting. I've found them okay so far, except that their guidelines are very rigid. A bit like telling an artist he has to paint within a certain frame, and that the frame is more important than his creation. I backed out of a second contract with them for this reason. They wanted me to make changes, so that my story would fit one of their (arbitrary) themes. The contract is for five years. No mention of a kill fee. I'd post it here but it's 11 pages long. Bla bla bla. But if anyone is interested in any of the clauses, I can oblige with that.


Cheers

kaitie
03-25-2010, 08:16 AM
I just wanted to point out that in this instance a perfectly reputable publisher has a long contract. I've seen it mentioned a couple of times that scammers always have long contracts, and I knew that wasn't necessarily accurate, but didn't have any examples to prove it. Just knew that I'd heard before that it wasn't that unusual for contracts to run long.

Just wanted to point out that implying someone is probably a scam because they have a long contract isn't necessarily accurate.

Stacia Kane
03-25-2010, 09:02 AM
Amber Quill is by invitation only, last time I checked, but I concur on the four. Siren/Bookstrand might fit in there, but I haven't been able to confirm solid numbers.


Amber Quill has a yearly contest where anyone is allowed to submit (I believe it's the Amber Heat contest? But don't take my word for it, as I haven't looked at it or anything in a few years) and the winners are published, thus becoming Amber Quill authors.



And again, I've heard AQ mentioned by some as one they consider in their top 5, but like Brindle I can't confirm it. I do have one friend who wrote for them for years and was generally quite happy with them and with her royalties.

smlgr8
03-25-2010, 06:47 PM
Amber Quill has a yearly contest where anyone is allowed to submit (I believe it's the Amber Heat contest? But don't take my word for it, as I haven't looked at it or anything in a few years) and the winners are published, thus becoming Amber Quill authors.



And again, I've heard AQ mentioned by some as one they consider in their top 5, but like Brindle I can't confirm it. I do have one friend who wrote for them for years and was generally quite happy with them and with her royalties.

Not to derail, but Amber Quill no longer runs the contest and hasn't for the last couple of years. It is invitation only. I can say that their focus is mostly on Amber Allure, the gay imprint, and my sales are pretty darn good and often better than my CP who writes for both Loose Id and Samhain. At the moment they do have an open call for submissions for M/M authors for specific themes, but generally it's still invite only.

linfred4
03-25-2010, 07:18 PM
Hi, kimsmith

I was wondering if RRP takes on Murder/Suspense? I do write other ones. Please let me know.

Ravenwing
03-25-2010, 07:41 PM
Hi, kimsmith

I was wondering if RRP takes on Murder/Suspense? I do write other ones. Please let me know.

They'll take on anything. They're an author mill. So why on earth would you want to submit to them? You can do better.

Stacia Kane
03-25-2010, 11:06 PM
Not to derail, but Amber Quill no longer runs the contest and hasn't for the last couple of years. It is invitation only. I can say that their focus is mostly on Amber Allure, the gay imprint, and my sales are pretty darn good and often better than my CP who writes for both Loose Id and Samhain. At the moment they do have an open call for submissions for M/M authors for specific themes, but generally it's still invite only.


Thanks! Good to know. :) Like I said I haven't looked at their site in some time .




They'll take on anything. They're an author mill. So why on earth would you want to submit to them? You can do better.


I do think, Linfred4, that perhaps you want to reread this entire thread before deciding to submit to this house. I listed above a few other epublishers/imprints who take stories in genres other than romance/erotic romance; perhaps you want to look at those instead?

LovesResearch
04-05-2010, 10:40 PM
I second Stacia on this. You might think about Samhain (http://www.samhainpublishing.com/), Ellora's Cave (http://www.jasminejade.com/default.aspx?skinid=11), Loose ID (http://www.loose-id.com/),Liquid Silver (http://www.liquidsilverbooks.com/), Carina Press (http://carinapress.com/)...

Don West
05-12-2010, 06:25 AM
Re the one hundred dollar termination fee at RRP. Wendi Felter (publisher) claims that this is split between the editor and artist. But according to the Piers Anthony site, the editors and artists are disputing this. They say they never see a penny of this money.

"May 2010 update: the termination fee is theoretically divided between the editor and the artist, but they are not necessarily getting it. That's another bad sign."

http://www.hipiers.com/publishing.html#R1

RedRose Publishing
07-18-2010, 08:51 PM
Ravenwing,

Thank you for all the wonderful words about the entity known as Red Rose Publishing. As I have previously told you in over 16 emails as well as Piers Anthony and others, it states in your contract that if there are no edits or a cover done on your book, all you have to do is send a certified letter to Red Rose Publishing.

Once the certified letter is recieved our attorneys have it noterized and filed with the courts then we send you a copy of the release. I do not know which part you did not understand, the certified or the sending part.

We at Red Rose Publishing do not want an author there that is not happy or anyone who does not want to be with us. Our acceptance rate is 12% of all books sent to us. Besides we are closed to outside submissions and have been for over 18 months, except for special story lines.

While no publisher can promise sales, Red Rose Publishing pays 3 outside companies to promote the company as a whole and the new releases. In addition to that please notice we are not releasing 30 books a month, and do not know where you got that information as it is not true. Please post accurate and correct information about Red Rose Publishing otherwise it looks like you are trying to be nasty, cause trouble or make libelous and slanderous statements.

That is not fair to your fellow authors who are at Red Rose Publishing, many who are happy to be there.

Take care and have a great weekend!

Red Rose Publishing

DreamWeaver
07-18-2010, 10:14 PM
Take care and have a great weekend! This reminds me of my old boss, who used to corner one at a Friday night office party to say, "By the way, I didn't like the way you handled X account. Be in my office Monday morning at 8am. Oh, and enjoy the party."

Momento Mori
07-18-2010, 10:21 PM
RedRose Publishing:
As I have previously told you in over 16 emails as well as Piers Anthony and others, it states in your contract that if there are no edits or a cover done on your book, all you have to do is send a certified letter to Red Rose Publishing.

Does this mean then that you are charging a kill fee if termination is sought after edits/cover art has been carried out? If so, is this kill fee the $200 that ravenwing mentioned in their post? If not, how much is the kill fee?


RedRose Publishing:
Red Rose Publishing pays 3 outside companies to promote the company as a whole and the new releases

Okay. Which companies are you using and what type of thing are they doing?


RedRose Publishing:
Please post accurate and correct information about Red Rose Publishing otherwise it looks like you are trying to be nasty, cause trouble or make libelous and slanderous statements.

The next time you speak to one of those attorneys of yours who notarise and file letters with the courts, get them to explain the difference between libel and slander.


RedRose Publishing:
That is not fair to your fellow authors who are at Red Rose Publishing, many who are happy to be there.

If someone has had a bad experience with your company, then they are entitled to post about it without having to worry about whether it's true of every other author published by your company. Personally, I think that ravenwing is a numpty with a grudge, but s/he is entitled to post about problems that they've encountered and what seems clear to me is that communication between you and her/him has been pretty poor - at least to the extent that ravenwing did not have his/her expectations of the publishing process managed effectively.

Given the complaints that others (such as Piers Anthony) has received, it does not seem to be an isolated experience.

You might want to work on that instead of coming to post on a message board thread that's been otherwise dead for 2 months to re-activate whatever's going on between you and ravenwing (which, incidentally, only draws more potentially negative attention to your company, thus undoing any and all good work that those 3 promotion companies you're paying are doing on your behalf).


RedRose Publishing:
Take care and have a great weekend!

You too. And come back real soon, y'hear?

MM

priceless1
07-18-2010, 11:02 PM
...if there are no edits or a cover done on your book, all you have to do is send a certified letter to Red Rose Publishing.

Once the certified letter is recieved our attorneys have it noterized and filed with the courts then we send you a copy of the release. I do not know which part you did not understand, the certified or the sending part.

I'm confused. Why would you need to notify the courts that you're releasing an author from your company, and to which court would these papers be filed?

Nadia
09-03-2010, 02:19 PM
Dear Author reported possible internal problems at Red Rose Publishing, including unpaid royalties and publishing books w/o contracts. http://dearauthor.com/wordpress/2010/09/02/red-rose-publishing-having-problems-internally/

Jamiekswriter
09-03-2010, 05:44 PM
Yowza that's some temper tantrum Red Rose threw! Holy unprofessionalism Batman!

CaoPaux
09-03-2010, 07:02 PM
Srsly? How are Ms. Holmes' contract issues a "personal attack" on RRP?

CaoPaux
09-03-2010, 07:10 PM
This thread has never been locked. You're probably thinking of Damnation Books.

veinglory
09-03-2010, 08:54 PM
Um, no. This publisher is not related to those ones and did not have the same issues.

Kensington
09-07-2010, 10:58 AM
Dear Author reported possible internal problems at Red Rose Publishing, including unpaid royalties and publishing books w/o contracts. http://dearauthor.com/wordpress/2010/09/02/red-rose-publishing-having-problems-internally/

Wow! Wendi Felter needs to get a grip. That email she sent was way out of line and totally unprofessional. I pity any authors caught up with a publisher like that.

Update: It seems that all Wendi's sins have been gathered together on one site. :-)

http://redrosepublishingwarning.blogspot.com/

Bubastes
09-10-2010, 10:50 PM
Aaaand Jane from Dear Author tweeted this today:


Just got off phone w atty for Red Rose Publishing. RRP is accusing me of being defamatory & will be sending me a C&D.

DreamWeaver
09-10-2010, 11:03 PM
Will be interesting to see if they go through with that. From what I've heard, the threat of legal action is much more common than actual legal action.

K_Woods
09-10-2010, 11:54 PM
Wow! Wendi Felter needs to get a grip. That email she sent was way out of line and totally unprofessional. I pity any authors caught up with a publisher like that.

Update: It seems that all Wendi's sins have been gathered together on one site. :-)

http://redrosepublishingwarning.blogspot.com/

"The blog you were looking for was not found."

Google search isn't yielding any clues, either.

JulieB
09-11-2010, 12:54 AM
I saw Jane's tweet as well.

Nadia
09-11-2010, 07:36 PM
Aaaand Jane from Dear Author tweeted this today:

She posted more info http://dearauthor.com/wordpress/2010/09/11/saturday-midday-news-red-rose-publishing-threatens-legal-action/

victoriastrauss
09-11-2010, 09:25 PM
Interesting. The "lawyer" who phoned Jane sounds rather un-lawyerly to me. Based on my own experience with such threats, I think the odds are good she won't hear anything further.

- Victoria

M.R.J. Le Blanc
09-11-2010, 11:01 PM
Why would any lawyer bother to phone anyway? Anytime I've ever gotten legal correspondance, it's always been a letter. No intimidating phonecalls, no scare tactics. Just 'this is what my client is asking of you, and this is how we're going to proceed if this isn't met'. My mom interacts with a lot of lawyers, and not a single one of them would EVER make this kind of phonecall. That's not how they operate. They have a process and making those phonecalls isn't in that.

Momento Mori
09-12-2010, 05:31 PM
Having read Jane's blog post, the obvious question to ask the "lawyer" who phoned her was why he seemed to have her telephone number but needed her to tell him her address. Either his client should have details of Jane's address from her contract, or the lawyer should already have done an address check via any one of the many public databases available to lawyers, e.g. the phone book.

My father once got a phone call from someone claiming to be a lawyer who wanted him to take out an entry in a book he'd written that mentioned his "client" (who he refused to name citing confidentiality). My dad put me on the phone with him and I spent a very happy 2 minutes regaling the many and varied ways I was going to make his life a living hell in terms of court procedure, disciplinary measures instituted via the Law Society and Solicitors Regulatory Authority and ultimately the police (given that impersonating a solicitor is a criminal offence in England). When he hung up the phone, I could almost smell the urine trickling down his leg.

Sigh.

Happy days.

Moral of the story - don't give in to shysters like this. They're snivelling little cowards and if you keep to the facts and call on them to do what they're threatening to do, they seldom follow through.

MM

Scribhneoir
09-12-2010, 10:16 PM
Having read Jane's blog post, the obvious question to ask the "lawyer" who phoned her was why he seemed to have her telephone number but needed her to tell him her address.

Perhaps because Jane lists a contact phone number on the blog?

Also, isn't Jane the attorney general of some midwestern state? I wonder if the "lawyer" knows how well versed in the law Jane is.

Stacia Kane
09-12-2010, 10:21 PM
Also, isn't Jane the attorney general of some midwestern state? I wonder if the "lawyer" knows how well versed in the law Jane is.


Jane is a personal injury attorney in Iowa. Clearly the "lawyer" had no idea that she actually is an attorney herself, but she's not an Attorney General. :)

Momento Mori
09-13-2010, 02:21 AM
Scribhneoir:
Perhaps because Jane lists a contact phone number on the blog?

Ah. Yes. That may well be it ...

:tries to recover:

Well, a lawyer could still check the number with the client to see if they've got an address from the contract or (I'm guessing because I'm not familiar with US law) there's a procedure they could go through to get the address from the ISP. Phoning someone up and saying "Give me your address so I can serve a C&D on you" is remarkably ... dumb.


Stacia Kane
Jane is a personal injury attorney in Iowa.

In which case I hope she dicks all over him (to use legal parlance).

MM

Irysangel
09-13-2010, 02:26 AM
She was an assistant attorney general to the state of Iowa in a former job. :)

Scribhneoir
09-13-2010, 06:39 AM
She was an assistant attorney general to the state of Iowa in a former job. :)

Ah, I'm glad that tidbit I pulled from somewhere in the dim, cobwebby section of my brain has some basis in reality.

I don't really follow Dear Author, though I pop in from time to time, so while I thought I recalled reading that Jane was an AG, when Stacia said she was a personal injury lawyer, I figured I was thinking of someone else. Thanks for clearing that up.

Terie
09-13-2010, 09:02 AM
Well, a lawyer could still check the number with the client to see if they've got an address from the contract ...

Um, what contract? Jane is a blogger (well-known author-related blog), not an RRP author.

Momento Mori
09-13-2010, 02:14 PM
Terie:
Um, what contract? Jane is a blogger (well-known author-related blog), not an RRP author.

If she's not an RRP lawyer, then the lawyer should be able to use the phone number on her blog to get an address or alternatively get the address from an application to the ISP.

Honestly though, this is all getting a leetle off the point ...

MM

AnneMarble
09-17-2010, 06:03 AM
If this is Thursday, then it must be time for another Red Rose update on DA:
http://dearauthor.com/wordpress/2010/09/16/red-rose-publisher-v-jane-round-1/

:popcorn:

victoriastrauss
09-17-2010, 07:32 PM
Do they not realize that Jane is an attorney? Amazing.

- Victoria

priceless1
09-17-2010, 08:45 PM
The thing any publisher fears - or should - is being made to look like an igorant arse. This is wince-worthy stuff.

Little1
09-17-2010, 09:12 PM
If this is Thursday, then it must be time for another Red Rose update on DA:
http://dearauthor.com/wordpress/2010/09/16/red-rose-publisher-v-jane-round-1/

:popcorn:


This could get interesting... *:popcorn: and waits...*

rosiroo
09-18-2010, 08:16 PM
Yikes...what a meltdown.

I have to admit I do enjoy reading smackdown posts and roll my eyes at the idiocy of the publisher, though. :popcorn:

Nightmelody
02-02-2011, 01:12 AM
Bumping this up with summary:

This publisher is still ignoring all unhappy authors, ignoring certified letters. She will not send out letters of reversion of rights and WILL retaliate by taking all books off third party sites, and authors out of Red Rose Loops. She will keep the books for sale on her own site--where they generate no sales.

Reported that publisher keeps books for sale after contract ends AND that publisher keeps rights after author pays hefty kill fee. Reported that publisher ignores statement errors and authors are missing statements of royalties or have statements with blank areas.

BEWARE. Publisher can make more $ by charging unhappy authors kill fees than she can by actually producing and selling books. AND she will still keep books on her site after the kill fee is paid!

Publisher only communicates to threaten law suits to unhappy authors.

Terie
02-02-2011, 09:59 AM
Bumping this up with summary:

This publisher is still ignoring all unhappy authors, ignoring certified letters. She will not send out letters of reversion of rights and WILL retaliate by taking all books off third party sites, and authors out of Red Rose Loops. She will keep the books for sale on her own site--where they generate no sales.

Reported that publisher keeps books for sale after contract ends AND that publisher keeps rights after author pays hefty kill termination fee. Reported that publisher ignores statement errors and authors are missing statements of royalties or have statements with blank areas.

BEWARE. Publisher can make more $ by charging unhappy authors kill termination fees than she can by actually producing and selling books. AND she will still keep books on her site after the kill termination fee is paid!

Publisher only communicates to threaten law suits to unhappy authors.

There, fixed the terminology.

A kill fee is one paid to an author by a publisher, typically for killing a contracted project at the publisher's decision.

A termination fee is one paid by an author to the publisher for ending a contract before its terms have been met at the author's decision.

The meanings of these terms are opposite and so it's best to use them correctly when talking about a publisher's misbehaviour. :)

RedBaron
02-02-2011, 07:13 PM
Thanks for bumping this up, Melisse, and to Terie for fixing the terminology.

I am one of the authors this publisher is jerking around with these issues. Statement errors, missing and late statements, charging termination fees in excess of the contracted amount AND even when the contract itself states no fees would be incurred by the author. Specifically, I'm referencing Section VII Term of Contract paragraph B which reads:



B. Author may petition Publisher to terminate contract at any time but will be responsible for production costs for applicable cover art and editors, including Publishers initial investment a one hundred dollar minimum is the cost at the time of this contract. $50 for the cover art and $50 for the editors if pulled before published but after a cover and editing has been done. After publication there must be a 90 day request for termination letter received by traceable mail, registered, etc., if the book has been out more than 30 days equaling a total of 120 day minimum, with no cost incurred to the author.


Though contracted in July 2009 and September 2009, my two books with this publisher were published February 25, 2010 and February 4, 2010 respectively after rushing through edits in January. First quarter royalties arrived in June, past the 45 business date we were verbally told the publisher had to provide statements and royalty checks, but since the publisher had a 'family emergency', I gave her a break. Later I learned the publisher 'conveniently' has emergencies around the time royalties and statements are due each quarter to explain delays in payment.

That did not sit well with me, so when the 45 business days expired at the end of the 2nd quarter and emails sent to the publisher remained unanswered, I sent my certified letter stating termination of the contract and gave the reason as failure to receive royalty statements. Both books had been out more than 180 days, far exceeding the 30 days in the contract and the receipt provided by the USPS showed it was received and signed for by Red Rose Publishing on September 7, 2010 so I marked the 90 days on my calendar and waited.

December arrived and I sent a reminder to the publisher about sending the release of rights for these works but received instead an email from the publisher stating that one of my books was available for release (thought which book was never identified and no release has been received) but the second book was bound by the contract and required me paying a $200 termination fee to the publisher in order to get this second book released.

I'm at a loss for where I'm contractually obligated to this $200 fee because nothing appears in either of the contracts I've signed. And despite multiple (and most times daily) emails to the publisher for clarification on these termination charges since the original December 17th email stating these charges were due, I've received one email yesterday from the publisher stating one book is available for release while the second requires a $200 termination fee but does not provide any detail on the books nor the contract stipulation showing this fee is due since the above paragraph from the contract doesn't apply.

In addition, the email received yesterday from the publisher shows that she's deducting the royalties I've earned from sales from this $200 "uncontracted" termination fee and will continue to do so until the $200 "uncontracted" termination fee has been met. {Note: I never did get a 3rd Quarter Statement so I can only base this on the 4th Quarter Statement received yesterday deducting more than $28 from the $200 fee which I'm assuming covers royalties never received from 2nd Quarter 2010, 3rd Quarter 2010 and 4th Quarter 2010} Maybe I'm too close to the situation but to me this is theft. It would be like me giving my notice to an employer, working out any contractual obligations, and then still being made to work for that employer for free until I made him some arbitratory amount.

At this point, I doubt I will ever get a formal release for these books from this publisher and that's fine. I can self-publish without one. To me, it's more important to let other authors and aspiring authors know so they can make fully-informed decisions about their career.

Ann_Mayburn
03-05-2011, 07:42 PM
Adding this tidbit to the bonfire that is Red Rose Publishing:

http://www.eroticromancepublishers.com/2011/03/red-rose-publishing-rumblings.html

jeliteraryservices
04-07-2011, 11:25 PM
I would like to add a name to your Publisher's Beware list. Red Rose Publishing has hit the trifecta when it comes to bad business practices. There are many blogs and other lists all over the web that detail this publishing company's unprofessionalism and criminal behavior.

Just some of the examples are: not releasing rights back to authors when the owner has sent certified letters of termination like is described in her contract, posing as law enforcement/federal agents or retired members of the police or federal criminal services, bulling, extortion, misappropriation of funds, and the list goes on and on.

There are many that have asked for their rights to be reverted back, but Wendi Felter, owner of Red Rose Publishing, has told authors that she has the choice to comply with the termination letters or to ignore them as she pleases. She has also ignored lawsuits and judements against her. Her NDA clause in her contracts are only for the authors, but she tells them that she has the right to broadcast any and all information about her authors anywhere she pleases.

She lies constantly about her social network and what she will do for her authors. She has refused to pay editors and cover artists after they leave her company even though she owes them royalties on books they have worked on. She refuses to pay some authors royalties, because she doesn't feel like paying them at that time. She also has been known to cuss out and abuse her author pool as a hole through many erratic posts on blogs and other mediums.

Silver-Midnight
12-28-2011, 12:52 PM
You know, I'm so glad that I came across this thread. I used to get some of my eBooks from Red Rose Publishing. (They offered free reads). I honestly considered them an option for publishing if I ever made their word count minimum. However, I now know that I shouldn't, or at least if I do, I'd be asking for a lot of problems, including losing the rights to my stories.

imogenenix
07-14-2014, 05:27 AM
The problems with RRP seem to be continuing. One look at their site shows it's down (and has been for the last few days) with a comment for the owner of the site to contact them asap.

Who knows how this will play out?

And yes, I've demanded my rights back from RRP and am glad to be re-working the stories in detail.

imogenenix
07-17-2014, 05:14 AM
The rumblings are that Red Rose Publishing is closing it's doors. The website has been down for several days and the silence has been interesting to say the least.

It would be great if reversion of rights were to follow but so far nothing. Just total radio silence.

veinglory
09-26-2014, 09:40 PM
I should note that while Red Rose continues to show every sign of being closed and some authors told me there was a closure notice but it was not in a verifiable venue, and many other authors report that they have never been officially notified of this. So they seemed to be... closed-ish?

brainstorm77
09-26-2014, 09:45 PM
Nothing updated on FB or Twitter since August 2013. Their webpage is also gone.