PDA

View Full Version : Skin conditions/diseases that can alter skin color



Cath
05-29-2007, 03:49 PM
I need a skin condition or a disease that can alter the color of a baby's skin. It should be present at birth and either make black or asian skin appear white, or vice versa.

Is there anything like that?

Shwebb
05-29-2007, 04:09 PM
How about albinism? There are different levels of it in humans; some will develop a little bit of pigment in their skin. But the hair will always be light, and so will the eyes. The eyes aren't always red; they can also appear violet, as well.

MajorDrums
05-29-2007, 04:26 PM
Vitiligo:http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000831.htm

Sohia Rose
05-29-2007, 05:05 PM
Vitiligo:http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000831.htm


At one point, Michael Jackson said he had this condition.

Petroglyph
05-29-2007, 05:08 PM
in my experience, most babies are born relatively pale. Most of my patients are Hispanic, Native American and Caucasian, so this might not help your story much, but with a hat on the kid, it is hard to judge a baby's ethnicity between Caucasian and Hispanic. I can tell the difference between a Navajo baby and Pueblo babies though. : ) Many of my Hispanic families (and there is a wide range of origins and backgrounds for these families, some have been "here" for 400 years straight from Spain, others migrated from Mexico (with a mix of Spanish and/or indigenous backgrounds), or Central or South America)....anyway many of these familes comment on how "white" the baby appears at birth.

The babies with Asian backgrounds (generally Vietnamese, Korean, and Hmong in my location) or African (Sierra Leone) or African-American or babies whose parents have come from the Middle East generally have facial characteristics reflecting their ethnicity, though their skins are quite white at birth.

This is of course just based in my baby-catching experience and may not apply to babies in other parts of the US or of the world where the genetic backgrounds may be quite different.

If you need your baby to appear white at birth, many simply do if you regard their skin tones independently, but their facial features often reflect their heritage more accurately. The hair (or lack thereof) often hints at the parents' ethnicity, but most babies have hats on within minutes of birth (they are fashionable that way!).

Boy, if you need some stories in this regard (tension, accusation, tears and hysteria!) PM me.

Sassee
05-29-2007, 06:33 PM
Midwife is right, nearly all babies are "white" at birth. Ethnic skin color comes in a few days/weeks later.

Vitiligo is a pretty cool looking skin condition. I knew someone in high school who had it all down one half of her body. In passing I also saw a darker skinned old woman that had it as well, and she was spotted like a dalmation.

Tsu Dho Nimh
05-29-2007, 08:55 PM
I need a skin condition or a disease that can alter the color of a baby's skin. It should be present at birth and either make black or asian skin appear white, or vice versa.

FYI, many "black" babies are quite pale when they are born and they darken by several shades over the next few weeks. I've seen them go from a pale coffee-with-cream to a nice milk-chocolate color, and I've heard that more dramatic changes are possible. It's enough to cause a really dark-complected father some stress.

The melanin producing systems aren't fully functional in babies. Those murky grey eyes darken quickly too.

Albinism would be permanent, but present at birth.

Cathy C
05-29-2007, 09:01 PM
Jaundice (http://children.webmd.com/tc/Jaundice-in-Newborns-Hyperbilirubinemia-Exams-and-Tests), Hepititis B (http://www.webmd.com/hepatitis/hepb-guide/Hepatitis-B-Symptoms) and Liver Cirrhosis (http://www.webmd.com/digestive-disorders/tc/Cirrhosis-Symptoms) all create a yellowing tone of the skin, which could appear Asian to someone who doesn't know better.

The_Grand_Duchess
05-29-2007, 09:29 PM
FYI, many "black" babies are quite pale when they are born and they darken by several shades over the next few weeks. I've seen them go from a pale coffee-with-cream to a nice milk-chocolate color, and I've heard that more dramatic changes are possible. It's enough to cause a really dark-complected father some stress.

The melanin producing systems aren't fully functional in babies. Those murky grey eyes darken quickly too.

Albinism would be permanent, but present at birth.

Yeah, black babies come out pretty pale. Althogh the tips of thier ears and under their fingernails have some color. Except for the actual medical conditions like jaundice there aren't really any conditons about skin color that can be identifed right at brith. It takes a few weeks. Would your stroy drastically change if the parents 'noticed' thier child still appeared to be pretty white a few weeks after the birth?

Cath
05-29-2007, 09:47 PM
It might help to know the scenario.

The child is born into a segretated society, where all babies are genetically altered to mirror the physical characteristics of their parent's social group. When one child is born miscolored, the parents try to sue the clinic -- but in this case, there's a medical cause for the condition so it's not a straightforward malpractice suit.

I need the condition to be lasting, not a temporary appearance at birth. And it can't be genetic or it would be picked up by the clinic (which rules out albinism). Vitiligo might suit, but it would be ideal if the condition were present from birth.

I might have to make one up. :)

Shwebb
05-30-2007, 12:12 AM
Cath, I know that Tetracycline (an antibiotic) when taken during pregnancy, can alter the baby's teeth color. What if you were to use that same idea and apply it to the baby's skin color? Would that solve your problem? I don't know that there is any drug that actually does that, but it would be an easy leap in logic--given the thalidomide babies and even SSRI meds that affect newborns when they're withdrawn from it after birth.

jamiehall
05-31-2007, 02:59 AM
I believe I remember something about an artificial blood substitute that looked like milk and would turn the skin strangely pale (until they were able to replace it with real blood). Blood actually lends a lot of color to the skin, virtually all of its pink/red tones and also some bluish tones. Can't remember the name of the stuff, or whether it was merely experimental or actually was used in emergencies.

Perhaps your baby could have a condition that required an in-utero replacement of its blood with an artificial substitute, and they didn't find out its real skin color until a transfusion with real blood was possible several weeks later.