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Dancre
05-27-2007, 11:23 PM
Is anyone reading this? It's on Oprah's book club. It is wonderfully written but very depressing. It's also very dark.

kim

WriterInChains
05-28-2007, 09:00 AM
I just finished it a couple days ago. I love a good tragedy, post-apocalyptic & all kinds of dark fiction too, but didn't enjoy this one. There were some sentences I read a few times because they were so cool, but otherwise, meh. Can't see what the fuss is all about (except that Oprah said to read it, which is its own phenomenon).

I picked it up because everyone's talking about it, but I groaned out loud at a couple of the blow-by-blow descriptions of the man's actions. Parts read more like a survival manual than a novel. JMO, obviously it worked for a lot of people. I'm not sorry I read it, but was not inspired to pick up anything else by McCarthy. In fact, the opposite is true.

Dancre
05-28-2007, 07:20 PM
I find just the opposite, myself. I liked how he never used the man or boy's name. It's like they forgot their names. Now it was stay alive till tomorrow attitude. It was horrifying to see people resorting to cannibolism to survive. Ick!!! I loved the metaphores though. But there are some parts that were hard for me to read, like the people in the cellar that were to be dinner. I kept thinking, how could you leave them there, knowing their fate? I got really angry at the MC for leaving them.

I guess I've stopped reading for entertainment and I just read to learn now. The only book I've read for entertainment sake is "Trinity Blood". That's it.

kim

WriterInChains
05-28-2007, 08:29 PM
I liked how he never used the man or boy's name. It's like they forgot their names.



This is one of the things I really liked about the book. Who needs names when there's nobody around to speak them? That, and the unconventional punctuation were really wonderful -- as if, in their brutal world using quotation marks and apostrophes would waste too much energy, would be superfluous at best.

rwam
09-13-2007, 08:37 PM
Anyone read this yet? I just finished it the other night. Loved it.

My thoughts:
1) I struck me as very Hemmingway-esque, mostly because of its simplicity.
2) The fragments and no quotations took awhile to get used to.
3) Since there were no chapters and only scene breaks, it made it very difficult to find a logical stopping point.

JMHO

Will Lavender
10-18-2007, 07:16 AM
One of the best I've read. Ever.

If I would've read it five years ago, I don't think I would've been so floored. But reading as a father... I dare you to find a more eloquent love story than the one McCarthy tells about in this novel.

I know it's cliche, but if there is a classic among the books written in the last decade, this might be it. Fantastic book on so many different levels.

I also recommend McCarthy's Blood Meridian, which is a much different kind of book but just as haunting and brutal.

joetrain
10-18-2007, 07:39 AM
i was quickly distracted from the the peculiarities of his writing (no quotes/chapters and the frags) by the sheer force of his simple eloquence and mercilessly goading narrative. i found the want to keep reading, rather than the lack of chapter breaks, to be the difficultly in finding a stopping point.

at first i was suspicious of such an ambitious setting, but his follow through was nothing short of pure grace.

great read.

Spiny Norman
10-27-2007, 02:24 AM
I also recommend McCarthy's Blood Meridian, which is a much different kind of book but just as haunting and brutal.

This. I haven't read The Road yet (going to buy it soon), but Blood Meridian a monstrous trip to the animalistic, godless heart of mankind without laws. It could be called a western, but it's depiction of the old west is alien and chilling. It could be a fantasy for the places it describes and the people and what they do.

Will Lavender
10-30-2007, 03:41 AM
This. I haven't read The Road yet (going to buy it soon), but Blood Meridian a monstrous trip to the animalistic, godless heart of mankind without laws. It could be called a western, but it's depiction of the old west is alien and chilling. It could be a fantasy for the places it describes and the people and what they do.

Great description.

I was enticed by David Foster Wallace's description of the book in the Salon.com Guide to Contemporary Writers. He said, simply, "Don't even ask."

That made me go out and by it.

And I found that the reason Wallace said what he said is because there's no describing that book. Fierce novel.

kreati0n
11-10-2007, 09:18 AM
McCarthy is my favorite writer.

Another book of his, "No Country For Old Men", was just adapted to film by the Coen Bros. It opened today, limited release.

So many brilliant books by this guy. Blood Meridian, Child of God, All The Pretty Horses, Suttree... he's indescribable.

absitinvidia
11-10-2007, 09:29 AM
I loved it. The attention to wordcrafting was amazing. The boy had never known another adult, so his speech was limited to what he heard from the man. The breakdown of rules of syntax, to me, mirrored the breakdown of society, so while you were reading you were uneasy because of the language. Excellent way to set a mood.

NemoBook
12-03-2007, 08:55 AM
3) Since there were no chapters and only scene breaks, it made it very difficult to find a logical stopping point.


I think this is another brilliant aspect of the form of The Road. There was no logical stopping point for the characters in the book either, so the bleak, no-light-at-the-end-of-the-tunnel experience of reading the book (without chapters) mirrors the experience of the characters.

josephwise
12-03-2007, 08:23 PM
I haven't read this either, but I probably will.

I like Cormac McCarthy, though I was a little under whelmed by No Country for Old Men. I loved the movie, but the book fell slightly flat, I thought. The movie followed the book almost exactly, but the book did a poorer job of building suspense, and of conveying Anton Chigurh's chilling human logic. He seemed robotic in the book, where Javier Bardem's performance in the film turned him into a compelling and fascinating character. The book did an otherwise great job in terms of developing characters that were both relatably human and symbolically iconic. But it was, I don't know, atmospherically clumsy I guess.

I'd be interested to see if The Road is a step up. I expect that it is.

chartreuse
12-11-2007, 02:30 AM
I read it in a day. It's funny - I didn't even realize there weren't chapters. Wouldn't have made me stop for a break anyway - I was absolutely enthralled - the story is just starkly, devastatingly beautiful. My only complaint is that it was so short.

I'd put it right up there with the classic TEOTWAWKI novels - Lucifer's Hammer, Earth Abides, Alas Babylon, The Stand. It's definitely one that I'll read again.

David Erlewine
12-11-2007, 02:58 AM
Hmmm...

This may be why I'm working full-time and not writing much anymore. I tried reading it last year and grew weary after about 10 pages. I folded up shop.

I have only read one of his books, "All the Pretty Horses", about 15 years ago or so. Loved it.

nonamesleft47
12-17-2007, 08:55 PM
I finished it Saturday. I thought it was good. The whole not having chapters and dialog were not confusing at all but I've read other authors that do the same things so I'm used to it. I am also used to stopping anywhere while reading (2 kids, reading at stop lights, on breaks at work, ect.) Overall i enjoyed it and thought it was better than some of his other work that I have read. The last several pages are heartbreaking, then uplifting.

chonnychonny
12-20-2007, 11:31 PM
I was completely enthralled in this book. I tend to enjoy the way books read when not punctuated...more like a dream than a story. The imagery is completely dark and at times, grotesque, but the story has such a warm tone to it with the father/son relationship. You can't help but be captivated.

Priene
02-09-2008, 02:54 PM
I'll file this one in the 'I can see why others like it, but...' drawer.

True, it's atmospheric and descriptive. But I could have done without the overt grisliness - Primo Levi's real life experiences, for instance, were much more upsetting. The Road did give me nightmares last night, though, so it was effective.

Like most roads, it's grey and dirty and doesn't lead anywhere worthwhile in the end.

KansasWriter
02-19-2008, 06:07 AM
I just finished it. Absolutely brilliant book. It reminds me of the first time I understood the meaning of the word "dystopia".

Chartreuse - I also read it in a day! Also, thanks for teaching me the new acronym (TEOTWAWKI)!

brainstorm77
07-12-2009, 04:20 AM
I just finished reading this book and I found it to be a boring read. I'm curious to know others views on this book.

alleycat
07-12-2009, 04:25 AM
I thought about reading it three or four times, but always decided it just wasn't the right time to try another McCarthy book. I start out really enjoying his books, then about half-way through have a hard time wanting to finish them. I also still have something of a "bad taste in my mouth" from No Country for Old Men.

Just an opinion.

brainstorm77
07-12-2009, 04:27 AM
I thought about reading it three or four times, but always decided it just wasn't the right time to try another McCarthy book. I start out really enjoying his books, then about half-way through have a hard time wanting to finish them. I also still have something of a "bad taste in my mouth" from No Country for Old Men.

Just an opinion.

I think I can't get his style. I read the book in a day and walked away with nothing from it. It's hard to explain....

Cranky
07-12-2009, 04:33 AM
I liked it a lot, well enough to review it (ha ha) on my blog. I've not done that very often at all, so make of that what you will.

I like a lot of his stuff, though, so perhaps I am a bit biased.

alleycat
07-12-2009, 04:35 AM
I read the first couple of chapters some time ago. They were just beginning their journey then.

alleycat
07-12-2009, 04:40 AM
Off-topic . . .

One of my favorite scenes in any of his books is when John Grady Cole and the others go to the whorehouse (I think it was from All the Pretty Horses). I think I laughed out loud at that scene. "Come one, John Grady, all the fat ones will be taken!" and "It looked like her face caught on fire and someone put it out with a rake." (Paraphrasing, I don't have the book in front of me to get the quotes exactly right.)

Kurtz
07-12-2009, 03:27 PM
I love the biblical feel to his prose. It falls a little flat in some of his work, but the Road is torn from the pages of Malachai. The last chapter of Malachi to be precise.

flyingtart
07-12-2009, 03:50 PM
I'm not surprised it polarises opinions. He walks a fine line between horror and abject misery but by the end I was in tears. I thought it was brutally honest and terrifying.

Kathleen42
07-12-2009, 03:53 PM
I loved it. I picked it up and could not stop reading it. I thought it was beautiful and terrifying.

One of the things I really liked about it was the almost complete lack of backstory.

Exir
07-12-2009, 04:09 PM
Normally I don't like the fact that McCarthy doesn't use quotation marks for dialogue. With The Road, though, since there are so few characters, that wasn't a problem.

Otherwise, I think he's a good writer. He just has these little quirks that makes my reading a ton harder. Thanks, Cormac!

brokenfingers
07-12-2009, 06:11 PM
I read all the hype about 'The Road' and read it and, like brainstorm, I felt 'meh' about it. It's written in a sparse style, which didn't bother me, but I couldn't get what all the fuss was about.

I felt like he hammered home the bond between the father and the son (through some serious repetition) only so he could enhance the reader's reaction at the end when the father dies. It just seemed kinda blatantly manipulative to me.

After I finished, the only thing I could conclude was that a lot of people responded to the impact at the end - which I guess what exactly what he intended.

In the end, I didn't see why it had won awards or was so hyped up.

But that's just me. As usual, all reading is subjective.

Miguelito
07-12-2009, 06:57 PM
I thought it was fantastic, not as good as No Country for Old Men, but still pretty darn good.

He was pretty minimalistic most of the time, especially with the brief chatter in the dialog, but with the occasional long passage of prose every now and then just to remind you that you were reading McCarthy. Furthermore, he rarely used more than one paragraph in the same scene unless it was part of a scene with a long stretch of dialog. Most of the time, anything that could have been considered the next paragraph was cut by a scene break.

I thought the minimalism and McCarthy's writing style where he uses very little punctuation in dialog, including quotation marks, played into the story well: society had collapsed and had taken all that pesky punctuation and grammar with it.

Oh, and I liked the father-son dynamic. The kid essentially realizing they were sliding further and further from being the good guys while the father was trying to do everything he could to keep the kid alive.

Fox The Cave
07-12-2009, 08:33 PM
I tried reading it, got like ten pages in. Couldn't get into it, it bored me. I figured if the whole book was just going to be like this, I wasn't even going to bother.

Forbidden Snowflake
07-12-2009, 09:46 PM
I tried reading it, got like ten pages in. Couldn't get into it, it bored me. I figured if the whole book was just going to be like this, I wasn't even going to bother.

I was wondering the same at first, but he describes the emotions etc. in such a raw simple way that it ends up leaving a big impression even though nothing much happens.

Kurtz
07-12-2009, 11:08 PM
I don't know how to do spoiler tags on this website. My views below contain, well, spoilers. There. I've actually told you now so you can't bitch about it. Not that there's any question where the book is going to end anyway.

The last chapter of the Book of Malachi.


1 "Surely the day is coming; it will burn like a furnace. All the arrogant and every evildoer will be stubble, and that day that is coming will set them on fire," says the LORD Almighty. "Not a root or a branch will be left to them.
2 But for you who revere my name, the sun of righteousness will rise with healing in its wings. And you will go out and leap like calves released from the stall.
3 Then you will trample down the wicked; they will be ashes under the soles of your feet on the day when I do these things," says the LORD Almighty.
4 "Remember the law of my servant Moses, the decrees and laws I gave him at Horeb for all Israel.
5 "See, I will send you the prophet Elijah before that great and dreadful day of the LORD comes.
6 He will turn the hearts of the fathers to their children, and the hearts of the children to their fathers; or else I will come and strike the land with a curse."
I read this book, it hit me pretty hard, but I was okay, maybe just a few tears now and then. My dad read it after me and after he read the bit when the dad dies he burst into tears and hugged my brother for like 4 hours. I think you have to be a dad to really get it. Cormac Mcarthy was about 60 when he had his son, you can really see his knowledge of his own mortality in it.

I also remember vividly (really vividly, as if I had seen it in a film actually) the bit when they're walking down the highway. Theres thousands of cars melted into the tarmac, skeletons in some of them, some melted into the road. The boy asks 'why didn't they run?'. Because why run? The whole earth was on fire.

The film trailer doesn't look entirely terrible either, you never know.

Delhomeboy
07-13-2009, 12:19 AM
Great book

scope
07-13-2009, 01:10 AM
I don't think McCarthy's books are for everyone. In a sense, it seems as if they have the ability to polarize -- black-white-very little gray.

I happen to be a huge McCarthy fan, and I absolutely loved THE ROAD.

brainstorm77
07-13-2009, 12:43 PM
Perhaps I will try another book by this author.

SPMiller
07-13-2009, 01:03 PM
This was not a polarizing book for me. Instead, I felt thoroughly meh about it both during and after my reading. As a reader and a writer, my opinions follow:

Good:
- fancy diction only when appropriate
- consistent sentence-craft
- good avoidance of stylistic irritations (e.g., adverbs)
- realistic dialog (or as realistic as it can get in fiction)
- no names provided for the two main characters

Meh:
- the point to the story isn't in the story so much as in the setting
- participial phrases could have helped in some places

Bad:
- overuse of adjectives and similes
- boring dialog
- relentlessly humorless and joyless

Kurtz
07-13-2009, 01:17 PM
This was not a polarizing book for me. Instead, I felt thoroughly meh about it both during and after my reading. As a reader and a writer, my opinions follow:

Bad:
- boring dialog
- relentlessly humorless and joyless

To be fair if there was any joy in it, the book would lose any meaning. It's supposed to be hideously bleak and hopeless. That's what McCarthy does. As for the dialog, well you did credit it with being "realistic", and when people talk in real life they are as boring as hell.

I understand some of the points about his writing style though, it's very unique. Personally I love overblown similies, it makes me feel like I'm reading about something more heroic than what I am (vestiges of Homer or something, I don't know).

I like people who say that The Road is McCarthy's first post apocalyptic novel.

SPMiller
07-13-2009, 01:29 PM
Personally I love overblown similies, it makes me feel like I'm reading about something more heroic than what I am (vestiges of Homer or something, I don't know).See, that's exactly what I didn't like. The characters weren't heroic; they were ordinary people in an extraordinarily shitty situation. To present them as heroic, which I agree the similes did, strikes me as dissonant. I still can't get over that.

Different strokes for different folks, as they say.

Kurtz
07-13-2009, 01:33 PM
See, that's exactly what I didn't like. The characters weren't heroic; they were ordinary people in an extraordinarily shitty situation. To present them as heroic, which I agree the similes did, strikes me as dissonant. I still can't get over that.

Different strokes for different folks, as they say.

lol don't read Ulysses

SPMiller
07-13-2009, 01:33 PM
I read Finnegans Wake. That was enuff Joyce for me, thx ;)

extortionist
07-13-2009, 01:48 PM
The last chapter of the Book of Malachi.
Why didn't you bold number 5? The prophet Elijah was in the book as well.

Kurtz
07-13-2009, 01:56 PM
Why didn't you bold number 5? The prophet Elijah was in the book as well.

Really? I haven't read it in a while.

I think I may remember something about a chariot of fire though, I'm not sure.

extortionist
07-13-2009, 02:11 PM
Really? I haven't read it in a while.

I think I may remember something about a chariot of fire though, I'm not sure.
It's maybe 3/4s the way through the book. An old blind man who talks a bunch about religion. He says his name's Eli, but then later when the man asks him again he says he lied about his name.

It's uncertain but it's about as certain as religious things ever get in a McCarthy novel.

extortionist
07-14-2009, 04:08 AM
See, that's exactly what I didn't like. The characters weren't heroic; they were ordinary people in an extraordinarily shitty situation. To present them as heroic, which I agree the similes did, strikes me as dissonant. I still can't get over that.

Different strokes for different folks, as they say.

I don't think it's exactly right to call them ordinary people--the ordinary people in the book's world are either dead, subjugated by depraved people, or become depraved themselves. The protagonists are heroic for remaining moral and hopeful in an otherwise fallen and hopeless world.

And even in non-moral terms the man is a rather extraordinary person--he's highly educated and has outstanding mechanical and survival skills.


Beyond all that, though, I think McCarthy just doesn't write about ordinary people (at least in his later books--I haven't read yet anything earlier than Blood Meridian). I mean, they're all ordinary in that they're not heads of state or gifted with supernatural powers, but they're all extraordinary in the way, say, some of Hemingway's protagonists are extraordinary.

Consider this quote from McCarthy's The Crossing:

The corridero held the fretted neck of his instrument with one hand and raised his glass from the table and toasted silently his inquisitor and toasted aloud the memory of all just men in the world for as it was sung in the corrido theirs was a bloodfilled road and the deeds of their lives were writ in that blood which was the world's heart's blood and he said that serious men sang their song and their song only.

McCarthy has a tendency to write about these rare, just men and the impossibility and tragedy of their task--he does it in all the books of his I've read and The Road is an exception only insofar as it seems to slightly revise some of his earlier takes on things.

I guess what I'm getting at is that if you came out of the book with the impression that it was about ordinary people and the prose was flawed in that it misrepresented them, you should look at the book again taking the perspective that it is trying to present them as heroic and look at the reasons why the book presents them as heroic. McCarthy's an extremely gifted writer and it's worth examining his word choices and style and all these things as intentional choices.

SPMiller
07-17-2009, 01:53 AM
I don't think it's exactly right to call them ordinary people--the ordinary people in the book's world are either dead, subjugated by depraved people, or become depraved themselves. The protagonists are heroic for remaining moral and hopeful in an otherwise fallen and hopeless world.Can't agree. There's ample evidence of ethical people throughout the narrative. On the other hand, there's plenty of depravity, too. The point is, everyone's dying, moral or not. And the man wasn't exactly a shining beacon of compassion.


And even in non-moral terms the man is a rather extraordinary person--he's highly educated and has outstanding mechanical and survival skills.This, however, I may agree with.

On another note: although The Road is a straightforward science fiction novel, McCarthy sure used a lot of fantasy tropes. For example, do we really need to know the contents of every can of food they eat? ;)

AMCrenshaw
07-17-2009, 02:19 AM
I've read everything by him. I think "The Road" is in my opinion his most experimental and maybe most personal. I read it in a few hours and it had a major emotional impact on me, like few books do. And, compared say to The Border Trilogy or Suttree, it is humorless, as SPM wrote, but I didn't expect to find any humor in the fears of an older man's vision of the future.

Setting was amazing. I coughed ash for a week after reading.
The dialogue was necessarily cut but I felt like it was completely accurate.
The internal monologues were very poignant, especially the one that asks, "Could you do it?"

The main character was interesting, thoughtful, and resourceful.

My knit about the story isn't the awfully depraved characters, but the fact that the man and his son kept, by grace of God-Hisself-Alone, finding caches of canned goods. I felt it was a touch unrealistic is all.

I hated the ending at first because it didn't make sense; it didn't answer anything. And yet, when I think of this story as being told from the imagination of a man who's letting his son go into the unknown future, for him (for us, too) there are no answers, only cloaks of ash, fleeting symbols we hope carry hope itself. What endures apocalypse? Love, from one generation to the next. I think it's a sound answer, but not one we're necessarily given.


AMC

extortionist
07-17-2009, 12:44 PM
Can't agree. There's ample evidence of ethical people throughout the narrative.
Where?

It's been a few years since I read the book but as I recall the only people they see that don't present a direct threat to them by the end are prisoners, slaves, and a few pseudo-religious figures--one who is only seen to die and the other an old blind man who can't present any immediate threat.

The story of the novel is the man searching out the 'good guys'--if he had found them he would have stopped looking, right?


The point is, everyone's dying, moral or not. And the man wasn't exactly a shining beacon of compassion.
Right--in an absolutely fallen world there's no reason at all for the man to act morally. It makes his life much more difficult in many ways, especially if you consider his refusal to commit suicide or filicide a moral choice.

I'd disagree also that 'the man wasn't exactly a shining beacon of compassion.' Throughout the book he is presented with moral choice after moral choice--at times he needs his son's encouragement to make the morally right choice but, in the end, does he ever fail to make that morally right choice? He wasn't Jesus but neither was he near an average man in the book's world.

That the man decides to maintain his own moral sense and search out other just men, which throughout the book he's not sure he'll find, paints him I think as almost a Kierkegaardian knight of faith--though McCarthy certainly has his own take on that idea (I hate to leave this point made so simply but I'd have to research the book a little more thoroughly and write a long paper to explain it completely, so this will have to suffice). But for persevering as he does in the face of the hopelessness of the world and against the absurdity of his mission the man is, for the book, absolutely an heroic character.

flyingtart
07-17-2009, 03:10 PM
I hated the ending at first because it didn't make sense; it didn't answer anything.

I've seen the ending criticised as being too pat and sentimental. But the ending is intriguing. His death is inevitable, however much we hope for his survival, and in dying he is finally giving up his son as all parents must to a world where children have to negotiate their own relationships and look out for themselves. And there is hope in the new relationship with the stranger. So ultimately there is hope in this story, however depressing it gets.

Kurtz
07-17-2009, 11:13 PM
I've seen the ending criticised as being too pat and sentimental. But the ending is intriguing. His death is inevitable, however much we hope for his survival, and in dying he is finally giving up his son as all parents must to a world where children have to negotiate their own relationships and look out for themselves. And there is hope in the new relationship with the stranger. So ultimately there is hope in this story, however depressing it gets.

But then when you think about it, there's no hope at all. The world is still dead, there is no food. Just because the kid is still alive doesn't mean his existence is going to change. There is still nothing left for him to grow up in.

flyingtart
07-17-2009, 11:43 PM
But then when you think about it, there's no hope at all. The world is still dead, there is no food. Just because the kid is still alive doesn't mean his existence is going to change. There is still nothing left for him to grow up in.
True, it is a forlorn hope. But we still want him to survive, don't we?

Doug Johnson
07-18-2009, 01:57 AM
It's an allegory. I found the symbolism fascinating. And yes there's hope. The father has done everything he can to achieve immortality.

Kurtz
07-18-2009, 02:08 AM
True, it is a forlorn hope. But we still want him to survive, don't we?

But wouldn't it have been better for him to have died with the mother? He wouldn't have suffered, and there was never any chance of him being 'happy'.

SPMiller
07-18-2009, 05:58 PM
My knit about the story isn't the awfully depraved characters, but the fact that the man and his son kept, by grace of God-Hisself-Alone, finding caches of canned goods. I felt it was a touch unrealistic is all.Well, if we're going to bring that up, then let's discuss the obvious lung affliction the man has. In the real world, whatever disease he has would gradually sap his strength. He'd be short of breath at all times and lack the strength to perform relatively simple tasks. Yet he swims in an icy fucking ocean back and forth to a beached ship mere days before his death. I'll admit, the coughing-blood-all-the-time detail was nice, but what about the rest of the symptoms?

I accepted that as a limitation of creating a narrative. How boring would it have been to read about the boy caring for his dying father for weeks? Maybe I should have been more critical, but I assumed McCarthy wasn't even trying to write a realistic novel.

Miguelito
07-18-2009, 06:46 PM
On another note: although The Road is a straightforward science fiction novel, McCarthy sure used a lot of fantasy tropes. For example, do we really need to know the contents of every can of food they eat? ;)
I'm not sure I agree. There's virtually no science discussed in The Road.I'd consider it speculative fiction with a touch of horror.

SPMiller
07-18-2009, 07:51 PM
That depends on your definition of science fiction. I consider it to be any spec fic with a premise based on technology. For me, nuclear holocaust (or whatever) satisfies those conditions. Fantasy is spec fic with a magical premise. Horror is either one plus a healthy dose of provoking fear or disgust in the reader. I wasn't disgusted or frightened, so...

RickN
07-19-2009, 03:31 AM
I read it and thought it was so-so. Didn't hate it, didn't like it enough to get anything else by the author.

Idkwiaowiw
07-19-2009, 06:02 AM
It was really dreary, but I loved it. The ending (without spoiling anything) really got me angry. I actually threw the book across the room. I was so annoyed with the author. In the whole, however, it's a very good book.

Saint Fool
07-24-2009, 06:22 AM
Smacked me up the side of the head. Loved it. The going on when there was no reason to go on, except the hope that they would find the good people. The meal cooking on the spit at the abandoned camp freaked me out - and I think gave me a nightmare.

Love how the dialogue read like free verse at times.

Can't see the movie being a success at the box office - except as an art house film.

Death Wizard
07-24-2009, 06:58 AM
Well, if we're going to bring that up, then let's discuss the obvious lung affliction the man has. In the real world, whatever disease he has would gradually sap his strength. He'd be short of breath at all times and lack the strength to perform relatively simple tasks. Yet he swims in an icy fucking ocean back and forth to a beached ship mere days before his death. I'll admit, the coughing-blood-all-the-time detail was nice, but what about the rest of the symptoms?

I accepted that as a limitation of creating a narrative. How boring would it have been to read about the boy caring for his dying father for weeks? Maybe I should have been more critical, but I assumed McCarthy wasn't even trying to write a realistic novel.

You must not have liked Gran Torino either!

Delhomeboy
07-24-2009, 07:22 AM
You must not have liked Gran Torino either!

Wait, you mean Gran Torino wasn't a true story????

Manderley
07-25-2009, 02:54 PM
Was impressed with the style and setting, but the whole thing made me so depressed I stopped reading about half way trough.

Rarri
02-02-2010, 02:16 PM
Read this last night - first McCarthy book i've read - and found it an incredible read, even more so perhaps, because i read it whilst our son slept beside me.

I'm still, in a way, trying to get my head around everything in the book but i'd be interested to see what others thought of it!

SPMiller
02-02-2010, 02:41 PM
More here:

http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=148114