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zahra
05-25-2007, 05:39 AM
I've never seen:
Pretty Woman
Top Gun
My Big Fat Greek Wedding
Apocalypse Now
There's Something About Mary
Schindler's List
Hotel Rwanda
To Have and to Have Not
Brokeback Mountain

And it's not through lack of opportunity, either. I just plain old don't wanna.

Jack Nog
05-25-2007, 05:55 AM
Phew..no Star Wars on the list...

zahra
05-25-2007, 06:00 AM
Phew..no Star Wars on the list...
Doesn't count, 'cos I actually tried to sit through one. Didn't make it, though. Oh, dear, are you frowning at me now?
:tongue

Storyteller5
05-25-2007, 06:52 AM
I haven't seen and don't care about seeing...

There's Something About Mary
Titanic
Brokeback Mountain
Borat
The Matrix 2 or 3

poetinahat
05-25-2007, 06:57 AM
I've never seen:
Pretty Woman --> Decent film, not a must-see.
Top Gun --> Pretty good if you like that sort of thing.
My Big Fat Greek Wedding --> didn't hate it, but it's way overrated.
Apocalypse Now --> Loved it.
There's Something About Mary --> Me neither. I'm violently allergic to Stiller, and Diaz doesn't do anything for me neither.
Schindler's List --> Maybe one day, and I'll probably be glad when I do, I guess.
Hotel Rwanda --> (blank)
To Have and to [sic] Have Not --> Utterly love it.
Brokeback Mountain --> Well-enough made and acted. But the story just irked me. Two incredibly selfish men, dressed up as heroes.

And it's not through lack of opportunity, either. I just plain old don't wanna.

Nice list. What have you seen that you like?

jvc
05-25-2007, 07:47 AM
Off hand some that I havent seen and probably wont.

Schindler's List
Hotel Rwanda
Brokeback Mountain
Any of the Nightmare on Elm street movies

zahra
05-25-2007, 10:10 PM
Nice list. What have you seen that you like?
Oh, and also haven't seen 'Basic Instinct'.

I was reading one of Joe Eszterhaz's books, in which he doesn't half bang on about his 'B. Instinct', and I realised that I still had no wish to see it. It made me think about other films that most people have seen and that I just don't want to (as opposed to another post here, about popular films you've seen but don't like; this is about films you just don't fancy, despite other people's rave reviews).

benbradley
05-25-2007, 10:39 PM
I "never" go see movies, yet I've seen Top Gun and Tron (an apparent precursor to the "Matrix" movies that I've never seen).

I've not seen any of the others listed, though I did hear a news conference where someone asked the President if he had seen Brokeback Mountain, and he hadn't seen it either.

For larger, more complete lists of movies I've never seen, please consult these websites:
http://allmovie.com
http://imdb.com

Stew21
05-25-2007, 10:45 PM
Slim: You know how to whistle, don't you, Steve? Just put your lips together and...blow






Come On! How could you not want to see To Have and Have Not?

dclary
05-25-2007, 10:45 PM
Top Gun's the only movie on that list *worth* seeing.

zahra
05-26-2007, 03:05 AM
Slim: You know how to whistle, don't you, Steve? Just put your lips together and...blow






Come On! How could you not want to see To Have and Have Not?
Dunno. Just ign'ant, I guess.

ChunkyC
05-26-2007, 03:13 AM
...though I did hear a news conference where someone asked the President if he had seen Brokeback Mountain, and he hadn't seen it either.
Brokeback Mountain, WMDs, the list goes on and on.... ;)

CheshireCat
05-26-2007, 05:50 AM
Brokeback Mountain, WMDs, the list goes on and on.... ;)


Give the man credit, he has raised obliviousness to a fine art.

Movies I've never seen:

The Wedding Singer
My Big Fat Greek Wedding
Brokeback Mountain
Lost in Translation
The Girl With One Pearl Earring (or whatever that's called)
Hotel Rwanda
Borat

Joe270
05-26-2007, 06:07 AM
Pretty Woman--fluff at best.
Top Gun--more fluff.
My Big Fat Greek Wedding--not bad, tight story.
Apocalypse Now--revisionist history doesn't play well here.
There's Something About Mary--disgusting, yes, but the funniest move I've ever seen.
Schindler's List--Not for everyone. The truth hurts.
Hotel Rwanda--Not for everyone.
To Have and to Have Not--I can't even remember it.
Brokeback Mountain--Won't buy into the hype, so I haven't seen it.



Add to your no see list:

Lost in Translation (utter drivel)

Letters from Iwo Jima (Revising history again.)

Mulon Rouge

Anything with Tom Cruise, Madonna, Adam Sandler, and Wil Farrell.

I will recommend:

The Gods Must Be Crazy

Pursuit of Happyness

The Sixth Sense

Shadow_Ferret
05-26-2007, 09:05 AM
I think we had a list like this once.

I've never seen
any Godfather movie
Goodfellas
Scarface
anything with James Dean
anything with Marlon Brando (except Apocolpyse Now)
anything with Leonardo Decrapio
The Sting
Dances with Wolves
Schindler's List
Brokeback Mountain
Taxi
Driving Miss Daisy
The Color Purple
Roots

Writer2011
05-26-2007, 09:09 AM
I've never seen:

The English Patient
Crash--the one that won best picture
Million Dollar Baby

I could list a thousand others... but won't..

Shadow--you have GOT to see Scarface

..."and you, what do you call yourself?"

.."My name is Tony Montana.."

Joe270
05-26-2007, 12:03 PM
Seems to me those who refuse to submit to the hype hollywood puts out are better off. I write novels and screenplays (teleplays at one time, too.) so I sorta have to watch the stuff.

Some I still won't watch. I wish I'd never seen Scarface, it sucked on too many macho levels. 'Sides, it was almost a carbon copy of the Godfather series, 'cept it was a hispanic main C. Load of crap. Any screenwriter here could do the same copy with an asian, or german, or russian, or canadian bad guy. Same plot, different cliches and accents. So what.

Remember all the hype for QT's latest movie? Last month? Hell, I doubt it cleared 10 mil at the box. Ha. QT's stuff has sucked since R. Dogs, and that was marginal just because it was original.

Zahra, don't buy into the hype. You've done pretty well so far. I just hope you didn't watch things like Duece Biggalo when you post what you don't watch.

Shadow_Ferret
05-26-2007, 07:06 PM
Ah, thanks. There's another one.

I've never seen a Quinten Tarentino movie.

zahra
05-26-2007, 10:19 PM
Seems to me those who refuse to submit to the hype hollywood puts out are better off. I write novels and screenplays (teleplays at one time, too.) so I sorta have to watch the stuff.

Some I still won't watch. I wish I'd never seen Scarface, it sucked on too many macho levels. 'Sides, it was almost a carbon copy of the Godfather series, 'cept it was a hispanic main C. Load of crap. Any screenwriter here could do the same copy with an asian, or german, or russian, or canadian bad guy. Same plot, different cliches and accents. So what.

Remember all the hype for QT's latest movie? Last month? Hell, I doubt it cleared 10 mil at the box. Ha. QT's stuff has sucked since R. Dogs, and that was marginal just because it was original.

Zahra, don't buy into the hype. You've done pretty well so far. I just hope you didn't watch things like Duece Biggalo when you post what you don't watch.

No, no Deuce Bigalow or anything like it. :) I've actually got Apocalypse Now in my video collection, but I can't bring myself...just never in the mood. Just fairly sure I won't enjoy it. But it's there, just in case. Mind you, it was years before I could persuade myself to watch my copy of Brief Encounter.

zahra
05-26-2007, 10:27 PM
Add to your no see list:

Lost in Translation (utter drivel)

Letters from Iwo Jima (Revising history again.)

Mulon Rouge

Anything with Tom Cruise, Madonna, Adam Sandler, and Wil Farrell.

I will recommend:

The Gods Must Be Crazy

Pursuit of Happyness

The Sixth Sense

Have no intention of seeing L.I.T. (shudder) or Letters (shudderx2). Could not make it through Moulin. Could not persuade myself to see Happyness even when on a plane and even though I like Will Smith's work. Love 6th Sense. (And before you all say something, I didn't know there was a twist because I try not to read anything about a movie I want to see - I just look at the review 'stars'. So I was surprised - hurray!):)

Jamesaritchie
05-26-2007, 11:09 PM
I've never seen:
Pretty Woman
Top Gun
My Big Fat Greek Wedding
Apocalypse Now
There's Something About Mary
Schindler's List
Hotel Rwanda
To Have and to Have Not
Brokeback Mountain

And it's not through lack of opportunity, either. I just plain old don't wanna.

You're missing some incredibly good movies.

zahra
05-27-2007, 03:34 AM
You're missing some incredibly good movies.

Possibly. But for various reasons, they just don't appeal.

I might one day see Hotel Rwanda, but I have read - and still read - about the Rwanda genocide quite extensively already. Also read and enjoyed Brokeback the short story, but my heart kind of sinks when I contemplate watching the movie. I think the whole premise of 'Pretty Woman' is typical Hollywood fluff, and even before I read the screenplay of 'Basic Instinct', I suspected I'd find the film woman-fearing and silly.

Etc.

Shadow_Ferret
05-27-2007, 08:03 AM
Eh. Most of the movies on your list won't make you a better human being if you see them, so I wouldn't worry about it. Many of them aren't all that great. I will say, however, that despite my disdain for the "chick flick," Greek Wedding surprised me. And To Have or Have Not is simply a classic in every sense of the word. Howard Hawks was a great director. And Bogart, Brennan, and Bacall are just delightful. Of all those films, that is the one I'd recommend you see.

Anne Lyle
05-27-2007, 01:29 PM
Pretty Woman - it was OK, in a brainless kind of way
Top Gun - haven't seen, don't care
My Big Fat Greek Wedding - OK, plus it had the cute guy from "Northern Exposure" :)
Apocalypse Now - saw it in my teens. meh
There's Something About Mary - haven't seen, not my sense of humour
Schindler's List - haven't seen, don't care strongly either way
Hotel Rwanda - haven't seen, definitely not my cup of tea
To Have and Have Not - have somehow managed to miss, would like to see (Bogie and Bacall - what's not to like?)
Brokeback Mountain - liked it, but not a film I'm likely to watch twice (too depressing)

I never watch modern horror movies, no matter how good the review, because I hate gore. Not violence per se - Zatoichi (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0363226/) is fantastic - but the kind of sadistic crap that passes for entertainment these days. Nor am I terribly interested in war movies (esp. WWII - yawn). Or anything gritty and depressing, even if it has the best acting on the planet.

Never seen - or likely to see - "Ring", "Saw"; "Reservoir Dogs" or similar QT movies; "Saving Private Ryan", "Pearl Harbour"; "Trainspotting", "Nil By Mouth", "Romper Stomper"; I could go on indefinitely...

akiwiguy
05-27-2007, 03:55 PM
Some of the ones I have seen on that list...

The English Patient: Liked it, but the novel is superbly written. I personally love Michael Ondaatje's style. I can see why he won a Booker for the novel.

There's Something About Mary: I thought some scenes were outrageously funny. Saw an interesting doco about this, and apparently the first people for the studio to see the script were worried about showing it to their boss. They thought it was extremely funny, but a bit risque and wondered how he'd react. Eventually he wondered why he was the only one who hadn't read this script that he'd been hearing rumours about, and demanded to see it. And when he finally did, he thought it was the funniest he'd ever seen... ever. So the scriptwriter knew what they were doing, that's for sure.

Basic Instinct: I thought it was a pretty good erotic thriller, and Sharon Stone managed to carry the theme of the power of sexuality better than most actresses could have. She could have twisted my mind pretty much the way she did Nick Curran's (Michael Douglas), that's for sure.

Quentin Tarantino Movies: Well, you either love or hate Pulp Fiction, and I couldn't count the number of people I know who rate it their cult-classic favourite. I'm not so keen on the Kill Bill movies or Reservoir Dogs. There's one aspect of Tarantino's work that fascinates me... his ability to create slick, quite enthralling, black-humouresque dialog around everyday topics, often in the context of conversations that are essentially bizarre philisophical debates. Amongst the obvious violence there are quite subtle themes running through the scripts. Love him or hate him, I for one can see why he's successful.

nevada
05-27-2007, 08:51 PM
To not watch a movie because "you think" you might not like it is like judging a book by its cover. Something that I'm sure none of us do. (Sure, i wander through the bookstore going "oooh shiny" at covers, but i do check out the book itself. :) )

Even if you dont end up liking the movie, there's an awful lot of things you could have learned from it. Movies and novels can't be used to compare to each other, but if you want to know how pacing works, there's nothing like a movie to instantly understand pacing.

Most of those movies you are refusing to see are examples of great cinema. I'll refrain from commenting on people's reviews (Brokeback Mountain is not about selfishness but hey if that's what you think, more power to you) but at least give them a try.

I've never understood the concept of "refusing" to read or see something. As writers, I think we can only get better the more exposure we get to all forms of entertainment. That idea of the lonely writer in his turret who doesnt leave the room for two years and writes teh great human novel is just a romantization (I know that's not a word) by people who have no idea how writing works.

Just for kicks, pick one movie on your list and see it. I highly recommend Schindler's List. Yes, it's very depressing but it is so worth it. What is greater than the momentary nobility of a lost man?

zahra
05-27-2007, 09:58 PM
To not watch a movie because "you think" you might not like it is like judging a book by its cover. I didn't say I refused to see a film because of its poster. I gather info in the same way as most people do when deciding about something. Something that I'm sure none of us do. (Sure, i wander through the bookstore going "oooh shiny" at covers, but i do check out the book itself. :) )

Even if you dont end up liking the movie, there's an awful lot of things you could have learned from it. Movies and novels can't be used to compare to each other, but if you want to know how pacing works, there's nothing like a movie to instantly understand pacing. I think most of us pick the films we see almost entirely on whether or not we feel we are going to like them. Sure there'll be some noble souls who sit through movies they suspect they'll hate/be bored by for the lesson they may learn, either about the subject or about making movies, but I prefer to do my learning about the former from a book and the latter from movies that actually appeal to me. It's not like I completely refuse to see all French cinema or all rom-coms, and I'm sure Brokeback isn't the only movie with exemplary pacing! :)

Most of those movies you are refusing to see are examples of great cinema. I'll refrain from commenting on people's reviews (Brokeback Mountain is not about selfishness but hey if that's what you think, more power to you) but at least give them a try.

I've never understood the concept of "refusing" to read or see something. Life (and sometimes - boo - money) being too short figures heavily.As writers, I think we can only get better the more exposure we get to all forms of entertainment. That idea of the lonely writer in his turret who doesnt leave the room for two years and writes teh great human novel is just a romantization (I know that's not a word) by people who have no idea how writing works. Agreed. I do see movies. I read books. Scripts. Go to the theatre. Listen to the radio. Watch TV. Work with 'the public'. Am in no way a 'lonely writer'. I should be so flaming lucky.

Just for kicks, pick one movie on your list and see it. I highly recommend Schindler's List. Yes, it's very depressing but it is so worth it. What is greater than the momentary nobility of a lost man?

I still opine that we all have the right not to see a movie we don't reckon we'll enjoy. You know you're just making me dig my heels in now, don't you?;)

nevada
05-27-2007, 10:08 PM
I still opine that we all have the right not to see a movie we don't reckon we'll enjoy. You know you're just making me dig my heels in now, don't you?;)

Oh don't get me wrong. I refuse to see The Hills Have Eyes one or two. My 8 yr old nephew wants to see it something fierce but so far he hasnt been able to con any adult into taking him. :)

I guess I just got the idea that people were refusing to see these movies simply because they were popular or because other people said they were good. Or because they were a product of Hollywood. My mistake. Carry on. :Hug2:

zahra
05-27-2007, 11:54 PM
Oh don't get me wrong. I refuse to see The Hills Have Eyes one or two. My 8 yr old nephew wants to see it something fierce but so far he hasnt been able to con any adult into taking him. :)

I guess I just got the idea that people were refusing to see these movies simply because they were popular or because other people said they were good. Or because they were a product of Hollywood. My mistake. Carry on. :Hug2:
'...refusing to see...movies simply because they were popular...etc' : Blimey, mate, even I haven't got the energy to be THAT contrary!:D

akiwiguy
05-28-2007, 02:24 AM
Something I'm trying to do more is to read books as a writer, not just for the pleasure. I think that's applicable to movies as well. Sometimes for a given movie, or even a certain director, there is some aspect that is unusually skillful. And it can be a quite good learning experience to try and figure exactly how they've succeeded so well at what they've created.

As an example, I'll refer to Pulp Fiction again. Purely as one example, but one that's intrigued me. Let's forget for a moment whether one loves or hates it; the standout aspect of that movie and some other Tarantino ones is the very clever use of dialogue. And often around strange topics that leave me wondering... why does this conversation seem so interesting? At the start of Reservoir Dogs for example, the gang of rather violent characters is sitting in a cafe having a debate about the meaning of the lyrics of "Like a Virgin". Then when it comes time to go, one of them won't tip the waitress and the others all want to know why, and that launches a philisophical debate about whether waitresses should be tipped. But what intrigues me is the way he makes these conversations so damned interesting.

What I'm getting at, forgetting movies that I think are just so trashy I could never sit through 10 minutes of them, if someone (or a certain movie) is successful then it's worth more than a passing glance as to why that is so. I remember on a course I did the first thing I was told was that writers need to read (and I think to some degree watch movies) in a quite different way to which we've become accustomed.

The same way, I think I'm also trying to not be so snobbish about genres. OK, romance might be something I'd personally find yeeesh, and to be honest I think once I'd have immediately justified my opinion with a kind of "well face it, compared with literary classics this is just churned out formulae." But hell, if someone is successful, then the simple fact is they've got a big jump on me. Not saying I could sit around reading certain books if they're not my thing, but if there is something to learn from a successful author then...

Having said all that, I am finding more and more Hollywood stuff intolerable, and I'm tending (although I'm finding less and less time) to watch a channel that features independent movies. Some clever stuff on there.

Shadow_Ferret
05-28-2007, 08:24 AM
To not watch a movie because "you think" you might not like it is like judging a book by its cover. Something that I'm sure none of us do.

Actually, I do judge books by their covers. That's what they are there for. And I judge movies by the trailers, or by who stars in it, or directed in it, or by reviews I've heard about it.

I read books and watch movies to be entertained. I don't want to be educated, or enlightened or touched. I want entertainment. I write entertainment.

Which is why I will never watch Schindler's List. I don't want to be depressed. I don't like dark, human dramas. I absolutely hated Saving Private Ryan for it's realism.

If I want that, I'll go read non-fiction or watch a documentary.

I've never understood the concept of forcing yourself to watch something you don't find interesting or entertaining to satisfy some idea that it somehow makes you a better writer. Writing makes me a better writer. And reading what you like to write makes you a better writer. The day I feel I'd like to write depressing and distressing World War II dramas is the day I'll rent Schindler's List. But until that day, I have no interest in seeing it.

Joe270
05-29-2007, 09:07 AM
It's not 'judging a book by its cover' because there are reviews, genre, etc. to consider.

For example, I like Reservoir Dogs, thought Pulp Fiction was too drug induced over the top pretentiousness to swallow.

After resisting for years, my wife and I finally watched Kill Bill, V1. Nothing else was on, and we're stuck in a hotel room. Both of us hated it on too many levels to name. That damn cartoon garbage I will name. It was followed with Vol. 2...we turned it off within minutes.

See? I've always known I wouldn't like that movie. It was free and I hated it.

Why spend money on something you won't like?

I think she's approriately voting with her pursestrings, and I like that.