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absolutewrite
08-08-2004, 05:33 PM
Hiya,

Writing an article for Writer's Digest about what happens when your editor leaves. Looking for a couple of writers to interview. Have you ever been in a situation where the editor who acquired your book left before the book was published? What happened? (Were there any "bumps," or was it a smooth transition to a new editor?)

Please e-mail me at jg @ jennaglatzer.com (remove spaces) if you're interested in answering a couple of questions and getting a plug for your book.

Thanks!

Tish Davidson
08-09-2004, 06:42 AM
I had this happen with the first non-fiction book I did for Scholastic. It was called (eventually) School Conflict. Editor 1 wanted a "journalistic" book. Editor 2 wanted a "more narrative book." The results were (I think) a choppier book than the following 2 books that were done solely with Editor 2, although the book got some good reviews. If you want to talk about it, e-mail me at davidson@att.net

absolutewrite
08-09-2004, 03:52 PM
Thanks, Tish! Everyone else: I have all the sources I need (including Tish), so don't bother responding to me, but feel free to discuss this issue on this thread if you like.

I've had 3 editor switches out of 10 books. Two were smooth transitions, one was pretty devastating. (First editor made promises the second one couldn't keep.) What have your experiences been like?

NomadPress
08-09-2004, 11:47 PM
I had two editor switches on a book I ghostwrote for Chronicle. It was a nightmare. All three editors were really young--just out of college--and wanted very different things from the book. The final prpoduct was okay, but I pretty much had to start over each time the personnel switched. I did it as a work for hire, too, which meant that in the end, I made no money.

absolutewrite
08-11-2004, 07:08 PM
Blech. That stinks! I've been really lucky that none of my editor-switches have resulted in major rewriting, but the latest one did result in a lot of broken promises about publicity, artwork, pub date, etc. It's amazing how often editors play musical chairs at magazines and book publishers-- particularly, I think, at larger publishers. Smaller companies seem to have more loyal staffs.

By the way, hi Lauri! Everyone, this is my favorite editor. :grin (She edited Make a Real Living as a Freelance Writer... no switcheroos!)