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Cath
04-30-2007, 03:38 AM
I've gathered these together from the links that used to be up here in a sticky. Thanks to I_Shrugged and others for the links so far. If you want to add any more, please do!

Agriculture
http://www.fao.org/ - The Food and Agriculture Org of the UN

American
http://www.bc.edu/bc_org/avp/cas/fnart/fa267/contents - Digital Archive of American Architecture
http://www.law.cornell.edu/constitution/ - Index of the US Constitution
http://www.supremecourtus.gov/ - The Supreme Court

Animals
http://www.animalbehaviorarchive.org/loginPublic.do - Animal Behavior Archives at Cornell.
http://www.enature.com/home/ - Enature (most animal species)

Art
http://www.artrenewal.org/ - Excellent art by the masters.
http://www.cordair.com/ - Quent Cordair Fine Art
http://www.gandygallery.com/art/index.htm - Fine Realist art
http://www.metmuseum.org/ - The Metropolitan Museum of Art
http://www.nymuseum.com - New YorkMuseum
http://www.safran-arts.com - Bernard Safran's Fine Arts
http://www.sandrashaw.com/ - Sandra Shaw, sculptor
http://www.sculpturegallery.com/ - Everything sculpture
http://www.sfae.com/ - The San Francisco Art Exchange
http://www.si.edu/ - The Smithsonian Institution

Baby Names
http://www.babynology.com - Baby Names and more

Biographies
http://www.biography.com - Biographies
http://www.s9.com - More Biographies

Countries
https://www.cia.gov/cia/publications...ook/index.htm - CIA World Fact book is a starting place for quick info

Crime
http://faculty.ncwc.edu/TOConnor/criminology.htm - The Criminology Mega Site

Dictionaries
http://www.britannica.com
http://www.dictionary.cambridge.org
http://www.dictionary.com
http://www.onelook.com
http://www.pacific-mall.comdictnary/index.htm - Online Dictionary List
http://www.rhymezone.com -Rhyming Dictionary
http://www.bartleby.com/61/ -American Heritage Dictionary
http://phrontistery.info/index.html - The Phrontistery (unusual Dictionaries)
http://www.yourdictionary.com
http://www.etymonline.com - Online Etymology Dictionary
http://www.onelook.com/reverse-dictionary.shtml - Describe a Concept in one word

Fashion
http://www.wishbookweb.com/ - This one requires a paid or two week trial subscription
http://www.homeaccentstoday.com/arti...lifestyles.php - lingerie catalogs, including some from the 40's
http://kclibrary.lonestar.edu/decade40.html
http://www.wikihow.com/Dress-in-American-1940s-Fashion
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1930%E2...945_in_fashion
http://www.film-classics.com/archives/4789
http://www.vintagefashionclub.com/1940s-fashion.html
http://www.fashion-era.com/1940s/index.htm
http://www.marquise.de/en/themes/timeline/time7.shtml
http://vintagefashionguild.org/fashi.../1940-to-1950/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1945%E2...960_in_fashion
http://www.evadress.com/1940s_c_8.html
http://www.decadesofstyle.com/vintage-patterns-1940s
http://www.sovintagepatterns.com/194...gpatterns.html
http://momspatterns.com/inc/searchre...dress&n=436045
http://www.edelweisspatterns.com/blog/?p=2459
http://blog.beyondretro.com/2011/09/...hionthe-1940s/
http://www.swingfashionista.com/tag/1940s-fashion/
http://newsroom.nwfilm.org/2012/04/1...view-part-one/
http://www.tweedmansvintage-blog.com...-clothing.html


Financial
http://www.bloomberg.com/intro3.html - Bloomberg Financial
http://www.kiplinger.com/personalfinance/magazine/ - Kiplinger's Finance
http://www.x-rates.com/calculator.html - Currency Calculator

Food and Drink
http://www.fao.org/ - The Food and Agriculture Org of the UN
http://www.wines.com/ - Wines

Fun
http://office.microsoft.com/en- - Microsoft Design Gallery (clip art, etc.)
http://www.afn.org/~afn15301/seussfiles/early.html - Early Dr. Seuss Stuff
http://www.crayola.com/ - Crayola Creativity Central
http://www.cyberfireworks.com/ - Virtual Fireworks
http://www.krittercards.com/ - Free online greeting cards with animal pics
http://www.snoopy.com/ - Peanuts comics and other strips
http://www.bored.com - for when you get really bored
http://www.snapbubbles.com/ - Virtual Bubble Wrap.

Grammar
http://www.grammarbook.com - The Blue Book of Grammar & Punctuation

History
http://www.historyplace.com - History
http://www.scopesys.com/today/ - look up any date in history.

Horses
http://www.fmwriters.com/Visionback/Issue10/themehorsesense.htm - Hilarious. Frequent writer faux-... um, mistakes.
http://www.fmwriters.com/Visionback/issue7/horsesforwriters1.htm - Another fmwriters article. Nice overview.
http://www.fmwriters.com/Visionback/Issue10/themehorsecom.htm - Communication. For writers
http://www.lifestyleblock.co.nz/articles/Horse_behaviour/06_horse_communication.htm -Communication: note- snicker=nicker
http://www.worlddressage.com/history.htm - History of dressage and some examples of warhorse development...
http://www.lipizzaner.com/airs.asp - Warefare
http://www.horseguild.com/Medieval_Horse_Breeds.php - Medieval Breeds. general and specific info, and terms.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horse_gait - Gaits. basic intro, there's a piaffe animation to the right. Also mentions how fast and how long horses can gallop!
http://www.ahorse4me.com/Horse%20Gaits%20in%20Motion.htm - Gaits, animation.
http://www.equusite.com/articles/basics/basicsColors.shtml - Horse colors and markings
http://www.fmwriters.com/Visionback/Issue10/themefeedinghorse.htm - Nutrition. Site specific to writers

Industry
http://www.industrialinfo.com/index.jsp - Interesting Industrial Info

Language
http://www.blackmask.com/books82c/dcvgr.htm#1_0 - dictionary of the vulgar tongue (c1811).
http://www.davidappleyard.com/english/vm.htm - British / American word variants. Literary Resources
http://www.etymonline.com/ - on-line etymology dictionary.
http://www.freetranslation.com/ - translate different languages

Law
www.law.cornell.edu/constitution - Index US Constitution
http://supremecourtus.gov/ -Supreme Court

Libraries
http://www.thomas.gov/ -THOMAS searchable database at LOC

Literature
http://andromeda.rutgers.edu/~jlynch/Lit/ - Literary resources on the net
http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/literature/laureates/ - List of every winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature
http://thomas.loc.gov/ - THOMAS the searchable database at the LOC
http://www.dawcl.com/ - Database of Award Winning Children's Literature
http://www.kidlit.co.uk/index.htm - Searchable database of kid's lit characters.
http://www.literaryencyclopedia.com/ - The Literary Encyclopedia
http://www.literature.org/ - Online literature library

Medicine and Healthcare
http://familydoctor.org - AmericanAcademy of Family Physicians
http://health.yahoo.com/drug - Yahoo Drug Guide (info about popular prescription
http://healthyminds.org/ - American Psychiatric Association
http://library.umsmed.edu/h-hyp-tc.html - Health Hyperlinks (includes links to medical writing
http://medlineplus.gov - Medline (a good starting point)
http://nccam.nih.gov - NationalCenter for Compementary and Alternative
http://ncfs.ucf.edu/home.html - The National Center for Forensic Science
http://www.aacap.org/index.ww - AmericanAcademy of Child and Adolescent
http://www.aao.org - AmericanAcademy of Opthamology
http://www.aap.org - AmericanAcademy of Pediatrics
http://www.aapd.org - American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry
http://www.cancer.org/docroot/home/index.asp?level - American Cancer Society
http://www.cdc.gov - US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr - Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (This has to
http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ - Clinical Trials (list of studies enrolling patients. No
http://www.emedicine.com - Emedicine.Com (physician written articles for
http://www.forensicdna.com/ - Forensic Education and Consulting
http://www.labtestsonline.org/index.html - Lab Tests Online (describes various lab tests and gives
http://www.mayo.edu/ - The Mayo Clinic
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov - National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute
http://www.nida.nih.gov/NIDAHome.html - National Institute on Drug Abuse (info on street drugs)
http://www.pharma-lexicon.com - Medical Abbreviation Dictionary
http://www.rarediseases.org - National Organization for Rare Disorders
http://www.reproline.jhu.edu/index.htm - Reproductive Health Online (associated with Johns
http://www2.niddk.nih.gov - National Institute for Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney
http://www3.niaid.nih.gov/ - National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
http://www.forensicdna.com - Forensic Education and Consulting
http://www.ncfs.ucf.edu/home.html - The Natl. Ctr. For Forensic Science

Military
http://www.af.mil/ - The US Air Force

Miscellaneous
http://www.gallup.com/ - The Gallup Organization (Polling, etc.)
http://www.howstuffworks.com/ - How Stuff Works
http://www.onelook.com/reverse-dictionary.shtml - describe a concept in one word.
http://www.sca.org/ - The Society for Creative Anachronism
http://www.typingtest.com/ - Free online typing test
http://www.filmhead.com/nanoexperts.html - Research any Subject
http://www.gallup.com - Gallup Org
http://www.mayo.edu/ - Mayo Clinic
http://www.crayola.com Crayola Creativity
http://www.govdeals.com/eas/index.cfm _GOV Deals
http://www.nada.com -Official Car Guide
http://www.familywatchdog.us -Natl. Sex Offender Reg
http://www.askanexpert.com/index.htm -Ask an Expert
http://www.pcphrases.com -Politically Correct Terms
http://www.lds.org/portal/site/LDSOrg -Latterday Saints Genealogy History Database
http://www.shopgoodwill.com --Great Place for picking up Vintage Collectables
http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,1073341,00.html -TIME ‘s 50

Music
http://www.niehs.nih.gov/kids/musicchild.htm - Lyrics to Kids' Songs

Museums
http://www.metmuseum.org -The Metropolitan Museum
http://www.si.edu - The Smithsonian Institution

Mythology and Folklore
http://webhome.idirect.com/~donlong/monsters/mons - encylopedia of monsters and mythical beasts
http://www.mythinglinks.org/home.html - Annotated Collection of World Mythology
http://www.pantheon.org/ - Encyclopedia Mythica (research myths)
http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/folklinks.html - Folklinks
http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/folktexts.html - Folktexts: A library of folklore at Pitt.

Names
http://www.babiesonline.com/pregnancy/babynames/ - Names
http://www.babynology.com/ - More names and other baby stuff

Nature
www.enature.com/home/ -Enature (animal species)

People
http://www.biography.com/ - Biographies
http://www.s9.com/ - Biographies

Philosophy
http://www.iep.utm.edu/ - The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy
http://www.philosophypages.com/ - Philosophy Pages

Quotations
http://miljokes.com/lqote.html - Famous Latin Quotes
http://wind.prohosting.com/~tqs/left.shtml - Author Index of Quotes
http://www.angelfire.com/md2/Ldotvets/Quotes.html - Quotes by Famous Americans
http://www.bartleby.com/100/ - Familiar Quotations (searchable by keyword)
http://www.brainyquote.com/ - BrainyQuote famous quotes
http://www.quotationspage.com/ - Another quotation site
http://www.quoteland.com/ - Quoteland

Religion
http://www.sacred-texts.com/index.htm - Sacred Texts
http://www.vatican.va/ --The Vatican Official Site

Research
http://filmhead.com/nanoexperts.html - research any subject.
http://scholar.google.com/ - Google Scholar (Beta)
http://www.digital-librarian.com/ - Interesting lists of links for research

Science
http://www.21stcenturysciencetech.com/ - 21st Century Science/Technology
http://www.exploratorium.edu/ronh/weight/ - Your weight on other planets
http://www.junkscience.com/ - Junk Science

Supernatural
http://www.afallon.com/europe.htm - Haunted Europe
http://www.magick7.com/ghosts/ghosts-and-spirits.htm - Descriptions of ghost and spirits throughout the world.

Technology
http://www.galttech.com/ - The Galt Download Zone (Fun Free and Shareware)
http://www.howstuffworks.com/index.htm -How Stuff Works

US Links
www.law.cornell.edu/constitution - Index US Constitution
http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/ -CIA

Wine
http://www.wines.com -Wines

Silver King
04-30-2007, 03:50 AM
Wow, what a great list! Thanks, Cath. :)


Thanks to I_Shrugged and others for the links so far.
I miss I_Shrugged. I wish she would come back...

SHBueche
06-07-2007, 06:34 PM
Thanks, you have quite an exhaustive list going. Also, I'd like to add: profnet.com, an excellent free source to turn to for experts in many fields.

Little Red Barn
07-09-2007, 01:23 AM
Mods, feel free to move, wherever is best -- didn't know where to put :D

Soccer Mom
07-09-2007, 02:12 AM
We have a big sticky of links in the request and expert forum. These would be boffo moved to there. What a lot of work you put in Kimmi!

Wow and thanks!

Little Red Barn
07-09-2007, 04:29 AM
Great Cath! Didn't know we had a sticky already :D

Smiling Ted
02-17-2008, 06:58 AM
Let me add this link to the "Fun" section -

A List of Books That Aren't! Cryptobibliography!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_fictional_books#DC_Comics

Smiling Ted
02-20-2008, 12:31 AM
Here's another one, where whistleblowers can anonymously post leaked documents:

http://wikileaks.be/wiki/Wikileaks

Riley
03-09-2008, 10:35 AM
How about a general information site:

Http://www.allexperts.com

People who know a lot about a subject join the site as "experts" and most will answer your questions in a professional, intelligent, and informative manner. Some of them actually have degrees in the categories they answer in. Occasionally, an answer doesn't come through at all, or the answerer sounds like s/he was drunk when answering the question, but I recently asked some questions about solar flares and what I learned pretty much blew my mind away.

You can learn about diet, fitness, autos, geography, physics, astronomy, religion, etc.

To improve your chances of getting an answer, write as if you were writing a letter to a professional. You know, be courteous, specific, and not too greedy for answers. Most won't answer anything that has more than three parts to it.

WittyandorIronic
05-10-2008, 06:53 PM
Here are some of my most useful sites.

http://libraries.mit.edu/help/virtualref/ - Collection of MORE online reference resources.
http://www.drugs.indiana.edu/drug-slang.aspx - Street slang, language, drugs
http://mit-vera.mit.edu/fmi/xsl/all.xsl?-db=Resource.fp7&-lay=RES_web&-max=100&-token.error=ro_search_error.xsl&Type=Database&Type.op=cn&-sortfield.1=Title&-sortfield.2=Interface&-sortorder.2=ascend&Hide=no&-find - Another general reference guide. Some of the links are MIT only, some are open to the public.

And a list of Regency England links I posted in the romance section. I thought I would repeat it here as well.

http://www.gaelenfoley.com/index-06history.html (LOTS of great links)
http://home.comcast.net/~dflawson/ (so much info it is almost confusing, lol)
http://www.ugoi.net/nonsense/name.html (general fun)
http://www.eclectics.com/allisonlane...cy_errors.html (always best to know what NOT to do)
http://www.regencylady.net/repository/ (lots-o-info)
http://heyerlist.org/slang.html (good language info)
http://72.14.253.104/search?q=cache:...ient=firefox-a
(info on inheritance)
http://www.eskimo.com/~lhowell/bcp16...c/kindred.html (table of kindred)
http://homepages.ihug.co.nz/~awoodley/faq.html#common (great links)
http://www.chinet.com/~laura/html/titles01.html (great links)
http://janitesonthejames.blogspot.co...d-regency.html
(AWESOME money info)
http://www.likesbooks.com/regent.html
http://www.janeausten.co.uk/magazine...pid=364&step=4 (more money info, and their general site has more great info)
http://www.chinet.com/~laura/html/titles12.html (correct forms of address)
http://lesleyannemcleod.homestead.co...christmas.html (regency Christmas info, plays heavily into one of my stories)
http://homepages.ihug.co.nz/~awoodle...ncy/marry.html (marriages)

Smiling Ted
05-17-2008, 11:59 PM
Here's a link I just found that gives the basics of crime reporting for new journalists.

http://www.justicejournalism.org/crimeguide/chapter01/chapter01.html

slcboston
06-10-2008, 11:26 PM
Came across this one today, a virtual plethora and cornucopia of all things Canadian (well, obscure Canadian things, mostly, but lots of indigenous and historical stuff):

Canada's Digital Collection (http://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/205/301/ic/cdc/E/Alphabet.asp)

DamaNegra
06-11-2008, 01:16 AM
Here's a link to a list of menus from lots of restaurants across the US

http://www.allmenus.com/locations/selected_cities/

scope
06-11-2008, 03:26 AM
Keep them coming---I love it!!!

Bmwhtly
06-17-2008, 09:11 PM
The Times (the UK newspaper) have plugged their archives into the interweb.
Bits of their newspaper from 1785 to 1985.
Archives here. (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/archive/?OTC-HPtoppuff&ATTR=archive1782)


Some of the more interesting bits (these link to the actual article's published at the time of the events):

Jack the Ripper. (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/viewArticle.arc?articleId=ARCHIVE-The_Times-1888-10-01-06-008&pageId=ARCHIVE-The_Times-1888-10-01-06&pageId=undefined) October 1888

Britain declares war on Germany. (http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/system/topicRoot/Britain_declares_war_on_Germany/) September 1939

The Moon Landing. (http://archive.timesonline.co.uk/tol/viewArticle.arc?articleId=ARCHIVE-The_Times-1969-07-25-01-001&pageId=ARCHIVE-The_Times-1969-07-25-01) July 1969

Eirin
08-26-2008, 06:36 PM
Terms for groups of animal, birds and insects to be found here:

http://http://www.hintsandthings.co.uk/kennel/collectives.htm (http://www.hintsandthings.co.uk/kennel/collectives.htm)

"A crash of elephants" seems so very appropriate. I'm also fond of "a quiver of cobras".
Or how 'bout "an implausibility of gnus"?
"A gang of elk" or a "business of ferrets"?

Very useful, this stuff :D

Juliette Wade
08-26-2008, 06:39 PM
I just found a great chemistry site called the Periodic Table of Videos. It has videos about each element and has a great sense of humor - useful for anyone using chemistry in a story for any reason.

http://www.periodicvideos.com/#

Tachyon
11-04-2008, 01:17 AM
Chirag Mehta's created a cool tool called "Tip of My Tongue" to help you when you've got the perfect word on the tip of your tongue but just can't recall it:
http://chir.ag/projects/tip-of-my-tongue/

Linda Adams
11-29-2008, 01:34 AM
Some more additions ...

Fashion
Black Tie Guide: http://www.blacktieguide.com/

Government
Searchable site for U.S. Government: http://www.usa.gov

Military
Since only the Air Force was originally listed--

Army: http://www.army.mil (http://www.army.mil/)
Navy: http://www.navy.mil (http://www.navy.mil/)
Marine Corps: http://www.usmc.mil (http://www.usmc.mil/)
Coast Guard: http://www.uscg.mil

Names
Social Security: http://www.ssa.gov/OACT/babynames/ - This site lists popular first names by year dating back over 100 years. Great for historical novels!

Newspapers

Links to all the newspapers in the U.S.: http://www.newspaperlinks.com/home.cfm

Willow_way
01-25-2009, 11:44 PM
I need some help on research and don't know where to post here. In my novel a key element is a piece of jewelry. It was popular in the 60 and 70"s. It is two half hearts and when the hearts are apart each one has a saying on it. One half was worn by each of the lovers. The saying was something about even though they were apart. Then when the two halves are put togeher the saying on the halves jioin to make another saying. Does anyone know what these hearts said and what they said when they were joined or where I can find out.

Suse
07-07-2009, 10:13 PM
I've just found an extensive encyclopedia resource with links to websites. It's user-generated, so I can't say how accurate it is, but it's a potentially a decent basic starting point for research.

You can search for your term on this page: http://key-phrase.com/Glossaries/

Or you can use the search box on the right-hand side of this page: http://www.keywen.com/ Hint: the left box only works if you are Russian, as I found out after ten minutes of scratching my head.

Smiling Ted
07-11-2009, 03:17 AM
Here's where the Wikipedia editors act as reference librarians.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Reference_desk

Perks
08-13-2009, 04:02 AM
What a great thread. I've been here for years and didn't know this was here.

DavidZahir
09-19-2009, 08:10 PM
Some fun links:

Victorian Sexual Slang (http://www.mookychick.co.uk/lists/victorian-slang-sexual-terms.php) (warning: nudity) :e2slap:
1811 Dictionary of Profanity (http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/5402)
British Military History Sites (http://www.lotsasites.com/topic?topic=britmil)
Victorian Wars Forum (http://www.victorianwars.com/index.php?sid=c99180756e3f18ea8dec26ee232beea0)
Eras of Elegance (http://www.erasofelegance.com/index.html)

TheMindKiller
08-27-2010, 08:03 AM
http://www.godchecker.com

Amazing website that collects a whole lot of information on a whole lot of gods. Check it out, it's just fun to peruse but even better for writing!

DavidZahir
11-28-2010, 06:05 AM
British Money Converter by Year (http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/currency/default0.asp#mid)

Rachel Udin
01-15-2011, 02:59 AM
Names:

Behindthename.com and surname.behindthename.com

Mostly Euro-centric names.

alhefner
04-19-2011, 12:59 AM
Lions and tigers and bears...oh my!

Useful info on various predators (the wild critter kind) that can be found in the United States:

Predator biology (http://www.predatormastersforums.com/forums/ubbthreads.php?ubb=postlist&Board=2&page=1)

In case your tale is set in the wilderness!

dreamcatcher
07-03-2011, 08:21 AM
Psychology for fiction writers:

archetypewriting.com (http://archetypewriting.com/index.html)

Snitchcat
08-20-2011, 03:04 PM
The other side of Hong Kong, the tourist destination (aptly named blog post!):

http://www.theasiamag.com/places/hong-kong-murder-in-our-chungking-mansions-hotel

UrbanAmazon
09-27-2011, 08:14 AM
I've found this site not only useful for fact-checking, but also for just browsing through to find inspiration in the weird and wonderful - http://atlasobscura.com/ Atlas Obscura, as they call it, is a compendium of strange, mysterious, delightful, or downright creepy places around the world, showcasing both natural and man-made locations, modern and ancient. Most listings include photographs, details on how to access or visit each spot, and a Google Maps location.

Anyone looking for any post-apocalyptic potential settings or abandoned military bases might be able to use this article as a starting point - http://www.cracked.com/article_19449_6-images-abandoned-weaponry-you-wont-believe-are-real.html Photos and reference links through the article.

In fact, I'd like to recommend http://www.cracked.com overall, though I find it usually functions best as a starting point for research, not a source on its own. Common topics or lists have included military history and heroism, nature, weird science, and pop culture. They tend to link to their sources and other references, though the language gets more than a little profane and they do tend to be biased toward sensationalism. (Complete understanding if you determine that this would be better listed elsewhere.)

ShannonR.
03-16-2012, 10:24 PM
I know this is an old thread, but here are some sites I've found informative:

Religion, Sociology
www.Religioustolerance.org (http://absolutewrite.com/forums/www.religioustolerance.org)-ReligiousTolerance.org, with information about basically every religion, practice or belief out there. Also a lot of information about the various conflicts that have gone on in the name of religion, urban legends, news items, etc.

Beliefnet.com (http://absolutewrite.com/forums/www.beliefnet.com)-Beliefnet, forums about pretty much everything, as well as articles about religion, spirituality, politics and other things.

About.com has articles about pretty much any subject you can think of, written by people who know what they're talking about.

Seth?
06-06-2012, 04:23 AM
There is a podcast by howstuffworks.com called Stuff You Should Know that I find really, really insightful in regards to research (and just for fun. :))

I would suggest it to anybody. They have like over 400 podcasts on a ton of different stuff. I've used organ donation, gender reassignment, Japanese stragglers and a plethora of others for my writing.

There are also a couple other podcasts that have proven helpful by hsw: Stuff You Missed in History Class, TechStuff, Stuff Mom Never Told you, Stuff From the B-side... All of them are awesome IMO. :D

Hope some of you find any of these helpful!


-Seth

GeorgeJames
06-12-2012, 05:43 AM
For crime writers this may be a help when MC interviewing suspects and trying to determine if lying.

http://www.humanliedetection.com/

Regards
GJ

Emermouse
08-29-2012, 04:06 AM
Here's something that'll help you if you're writing about a character with an accent and need to have an idea of what he/she sounds like: http://accent.gmu.edu/

MythMonger
10-03-2012, 08:20 PM
Every college football game ever played:

http://cfbdatawarehouse.com/index.php

Xothian Star-Spawn
01-24-2013, 05:24 AM
11 simple guidelines to keep fictional ecosystems plausible and consistent:

http://hollylisle.com/worldbuilding-rollicking-rules-of-ecosystems/

snafu1056
07-19-2013, 01:51 AM
Assorted bits n pieces:

Dictionary of medieval Russian names
http://heraldry.sca.org/names/paul/

Vocabulum or, The Rogue's lexicon: Dictionary of mid 19th century New York criminal slang
http://archive.org/stream/cu31924073798740#page/n9/mode/2up

Chinese character dictionary: handy reference for translating Chinese words and characters
http://www.mandarintools.com/chardict.html

Comprehensive List of all the attractions and rides ever to exist on Coney Island
http://www.westland.net/coneyisland/articles/ridelist.htm


Chinese Exclamations
http://hua.umf.maine.edu/Chinese/topics/exclamation/douying.html

M J Austwick
08-01-2013, 10:15 PM
The Historical European Martial Arts Coalition has recently published the first in a series of Factsheets pertaining to authentic historical combat. Worth a look if you're interested in violence.

http://www.hemac.org/index.php?site=factsheets

snafu1056
08-30-2013, 11:20 AM
Great racial demographics map of the US

http://demographics.coopercenter.org/DotMap/index.html

bookworm92
11-01-2013, 01:03 PM
Demographics of a Fantasy Medieval Society:

http://www.rpglibrary.org/utils/meddemog/

and an explanation for the stats:

http://www222.pair.com/sjohn/blueroom/demog.htm
(http://www222.pair.com/sjohn/blueroom/demog.htm)

mirandashell
04-03-2014, 03:59 PM
For those who wish to know what a Shetlander sounds like without having to travel all the way there and for those who don't believe how much accents can vary over a very small area, I present this:

http://www.shetlanddialect.org.uk/dialect-map-of-shetland

Enjoy!


And BTW, this is the Shetland Islands:

https://www.google.co.uk/maps/vt/data=VLHX1wd2Cgu8wR6jwyh-km8JBWAkEzU4,tb2h3d-ueMOvELFRHN3DexgVCNE3Sljwz1SdzEo_75DdAiU0E3sp_whjg _z77IG0jflHQPgpCSRioFAbRnapLghxJaWxsyeH0Th6Q3GlAxV HT6Ef1dEjliHaNI4m_cd_kZkfMYodmgSfOdZcFFW7d0zhfEz7f l5niYH5l4lurj0rzJU1vAIx2kXTAhAwiFs4Di9mQ77r


And they are right at the top of this:
http://www.mapsofworld.com/united-kingdom/britain/maps/britain-map.gif

And they look like this:
http://move.shetland.org/assets/images/move-to-shetland/john-coutts-lerwick.jpg

Los Pollos Hermanos
04-03-2014, 09:50 PM
I remember my Dad telling the tale of how some Shetland residents had to fill out an information form (I forget for what), where one of the questions was about their nearest railway station. They answered with "Bergen, Norway" as it's apparently technically nearer than mainland Scotland on some of the islands.

I've been to John O'Groats, but the Orkneys/Shetlands are still on my bucket list!

jaksen
04-03-2014, 10:04 PM
Very interesting. Some I can understand quite well; others I can't. I think it's a common complaint when someone is speaking your language, and you can pick up most of the words but not all of them, that you want to say: Slow down!

A lot of differences in a fairly small area. You might find the same in some parts of the US. English is being spoken, but the dialects are so various, you'll hear a great difference in the way words are spoken or strung together.

But fascinating nonetheless.

ULTRAGOTHA
04-03-2014, 10:07 PM
I've been to the Orkney's. Very pretty and lots and lots and lots and lots of neolithic (and older lithic) archeological sites. We had so much fun and I wish we could go back. Also, the best ice cream I have ever eaten.

I wonder if there's a site out there that could help me with my minor Welsh character. He hasn't much of a speaking part but I want to get it right.

mirandashell
04-03-2014, 10:11 PM
Yes there is. I think the BBC has either a site or a link to a site that has gathered together a lot of the dialects of the British Isles. Mainly because a lot of them are slowly disappearing. Let me see if I can find it.

mirandashell
04-03-2014, 10:25 PM
I found it!

It's someone from the BBC but it's kept on the British Library website. And it's a great resource!

http://sounds.bl.uk/Accents-and-dialects/BBC-Voices/021M-C1190X0007XX-0201V0

Telergic
04-03-2014, 10:31 PM
I wonder if there's a site out there that could help me with my minor Welsh character. He hasn't much of a speaking part but I want to get it right.

Just append -bach occasionally to people's names, you'll be fine :)

Seriously, I'm a little concerned about this myself. For a WIP I have people from Wales, Cornwall, Ireland, Man, and highland and lowland Scotland speaking English together, and I'm trying to give them distinctive voices, despite not being a native of the UK myself.

Broad Scots is easy enough -- so easy you can fall into a parody if you're not careful -- but some of the others are less clear, especially if you don't use dialect-spellings. There are plenty of sites out there including various Wikipedia pages that list characteristic phrases and styles, but the trick is to use them in a way that suggests the differences without seeming blatant or intrusive. So for example, I gather that in Wales there is more of a tendency to phrase statements as questions than in England. But this tendency can't be presented in too obvious a way or it will look silly, don't you think?

mirandashell
04-03-2014, 10:35 PM
Definitely listen to that website. It's got lots of native speakers having conversations about how they speak. It will definitely help you distinguish the different inflections and decide how much you want to add to your writing. It's also really good for slang.

Telergic
04-03-2014, 10:50 PM
And this is a great video I just found, a single reader talking his way through a survey of all the major dialects while the video follows on the map:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-8mzWkuOxz8

However, this is all pronunciation, not regional phrases and distinctive usages.

Bolero
04-04-2014, 01:51 AM
The YouTube one is good - accurate, but the accents are pretty mild. :)

There are joke/humour books around about accent and dialect - remember one about "Bristle" - which is the Bristolian saying "Bristol".

I'd do a search for humorous phrase books - that will give you some "classic" phrases.

williemeikle
04-04-2014, 02:04 AM
Just append -bach occasionally to people's names, you'll be fine :)


Broad Scots is easy enough

Hah! An Ayrshire man ( like me ) talking to a Glaswegian (say), both conversing in broad Scots, use completely different diction and colloquialisms.

Telergic
04-04-2014, 02:33 AM
Hah! An Ayrshire man ( like me ) talking to a Glaswegian (say), both conversing in broad Scots, use completely different diction and colloquialisms.

Heh, I mean, easy enough to convey to a non-Scotsman. But I understand I'll have to caw canny to be convincing to a native :)

Edit (after pause for Google Maps): Wow, and Ayrshire is only around 30 km from Glasgow, right? That's a short distance for a large difference.

williemeikle
04-04-2014, 02:48 AM
Heh, I mean, easy enough to convey to a non-Scotsman. But I understand I'll have to caw canny to be convincing to a native :)

Edit (after pause for Google Maps): Wow, and Ayrshire is only around 30 km from Glasgow, right? That's a short distance for a large difference.

Yep - And I'm from North Ayrshire, so as close to Glasgow as it comes, but the difference between there and Glasgow in speech is definitely marked.

Ken whit a' mean?

ULTRAGOTHA
04-04-2014, 05:25 AM
Hah! An Ayrshire man ( like me ) talking to a Glaswegian (say), both conversing in broad Scots, use completely different diction and colloquialisms.

I thought Glaswegians spoke no language known to man? There were Scots at the Worldcon in Glasgow in 2005 that couldn't understand the taxi drivers, much less us poor USAians.


Mirandashell, you rock! Thanks!

onesecondglance
04-04-2014, 12:08 PM
... remember one about "Bristle" - which is the Bristolian saying "Bristol".


It can be closer to "Brizzull" depending on how thick the accent is. :)

Bolero
04-04-2014, 02:14 PM
@onesecond - :D


Just append -bach occasionally to people's names, you'll be fine :)

Seriously, I'm a little concerned about this myself. For a WIP I have people from Wales, Cornwall, Ireland, Man, and highland and lowland Scotland speaking English together, and I'm trying to give them distinctive voices, despite not being a native of the UK myself.

Broad Scots is easy enough -- so easy you can fall into a parody if you're not careful -- but some of the others are less clear, especially if you don't use dialect-spellings. There are plenty of sites out there including various Wikipedia pages that list characteristic phrases and styles, but the trick is to use them in a way that suggests the differences without seeming blatant or intrusive. So for example, I gather that in Wales there is more of a tendency to phrase statements as questions than in England. But this tendency can't be presented in too obvious a way or it will look silly, don't you think?

Couple of comments - Welsh is a lilting accent, so you can also get a rise in voice that implies a question when it isn't.

Depending on what jobs your characters are doing, and how much they've travelled, they may not have much accent left. Varies a lot. (It is the kind of thing that comes out more strongly if someone is upset. Might suddenly let rip with an old home phrase.)

Student in my year was from Glasgow - I had to ask him to speak slowly to get what he was saying. But he said when he went home, his family were saying he had lost his accent and turned into a southerner.

Place I worked near London, one of my colleagues who was from London and lightly London in accent (I won't say cockney as I don't think he was born in earshot of Bow Bells), one day talked about a girl who'd used to work at the company. Got enthusiastic about her lovely red hair, well turned out, really clever and then said "She was from Cornwall and we were always teasing her about how smart she looked but she sounded like a hayseed."

Los Pollos Hermanos
04-04-2014, 09:53 PM
I was born in NW England, lived near London from the ages of 7-18/21 (family still in SE, me in Manchester for university) and then I moved back to NW for work. Consequently, I have a mish-mash accent and nobody has a clue where I'm from! I've had everything from Scottish to Scouse to Cockney suggested - haha!

mirandashell
04-04-2014, 10:02 PM
I worked abroad once and developed an Estuary accent. Not consciously but just from the people I was working with. And then a friend of mine was with me when I phoned home on a public phone. And after the call she said 'I didn't know you were a Brummie'. I hadn't realised but as soon as my Mom spoke to me, my accent went back to its roots.

I'm one of those people who absorb other peoples accents.

amergina
04-04-2014, 10:17 PM
There's an amazing collection of speech accents for all kinds of languages here:

http://accent.gmu.edu/browse_language.php

mirandashell
04-04-2014, 10:20 PM
I did live in Brizzle for a while and what interested me on the British Library website was the difference in the accents between the pupils at the posh girls school and the old women from Knowle West . The latter is definitely what I think of as a Brizzle accent.

mirandashell
04-04-2014, 10:21 PM
There's an amazing collection of speech accents for all kinds of languages here:

http://accent.gmu.edu/browse_language.php

That's a lot of languages! I haven't listened to it yet but are they all native speakers?

amergina
04-04-2014, 10:38 PM
Ah, I was a bit incorrect in my description. All the speakers speak English (the same basic paragraph). Some are native speakers (500+ under English from all over) many are not. There's info about when they learned English and how.

It's a fascinating collection of accents. Heck, even just browsing the native English speakers!

mirandashell
04-04-2014, 10:41 PM
Ah I see! My apologies. Like I said, I hadn't listened to it so I assumed it was native languages.

eyeblink
04-05-2014, 02:59 AM
For those who wish to know what a Shetlander sounds like without having to travel all the way there and for those who don't believe how much accents can vary over a very small area, I present this:

http://www.shetlanddialect.org.uk/dialect-map-of-shetland

Enjoy!


And BTW, this is the Shetland Islands:

https://www.google.co.uk/maps/vt/data=VLHX1wd2Cgu8wR6jwyh-km8JBWAkEzU4,tb2h3d-ueMOvELFRHN3DexgVCNE3Sljwz1SdzEo_75DdAiU0E3sp_whjg _z77IG0jflHQPgpCSRioFAbRnapLghxJaWxsyeH0Th6Q3GlAxV HT6Ef1dEjliHaNI4m_cd_kZkfMYodmgSfOdZcFFW7d0zhfEz7f l5niYH5l4lurj0rzJU1vAIx2kXTAhAwiFs4Di9mQ77r


And they are right at the top of this:
http://www.mapsofworld.com/united-kingdom/britain/maps/britain-map.gif

And they look like this:
http://move.shetland.org/assets/images/move-to-shetland/john-coutts-lerwick.jpg


I remember my Dad telling the tale of how some Shetland residents had to fill out an information form (I forget for what), where one of the questions was about their nearest railway station. They answered with "Bergen, Norway" as it's apparently technically nearer than mainland Scotland on some of the islands.

I've been to John O'Groats, but the Orkneys/Shetlands are still on my bucket list!

I've been three times to Shetland (and it's "Shetland", by the way, not "the Shetlands" or "Shetland Islands"). If you like bleak and windswept, I can definitely recommend it. The nearest UK rail station is in Thurso on the mainland, and Bergen is indeed nearer. In fact, Lerwick is further away from London than Milan is.

It's not easy or especially cheap to get to though: you can fly from Aberdeen or take an overnight ferry from there. There's a ferry from Orkney to Shetland which takes about eight hours.

I would also recommend the coach trip to the far north of the islands, which went on Wednesdays when I did it (1999), ten hours round trip, during which you can have a drink at the northermost pub in the British Isles. (The Baltasound Hotel on Unst, though I understand the old radar station at Saxa Vord since then been turned into a tourism complex.)


Yep - And I'm from North Ayrshire, so as close to Glasgow as it comes, but the difference between there and Glasgow in speech is definitely marked.

Ken whit a' mean?

I can vouch for this. There's a well-known SFF writer, born in Kilwinning, I'm thinking of, and he can be hard to understand at times, especially when he's had a bit to drink.

See also the 2002 film Sweet Sixteen, set in Greenock, which has twice been shown on British television with English subtitles throughout. (In the cinema it was just the first reel, with a note saying that you were on your own after that...)

ULTRAGOTHA
04-05-2014, 03:45 AM
I'm one of those people who absorb other peoples accents.

I do that, too. It can be darned embarrassing if people think I'm mocking them. Sigh.

I spent three months in London at university. Got off the plane. Said, "Hi sister!" and she said "Oh, you have a British accent!"

Double sigh.

King Neptune
04-05-2014, 04:19 AM
I've been three times to Shetland (and it's "Shetland", by the way, not "the Shetlands" or "Shetland Islands"). If you like bleak and windswept, I can definitely recommend it. The nearest UK rail station is in Thurso on the mainland, and Bergen is indeed nearer. In fact, Lerwick is further away from London than Milan is.

It's not easy or especially cheap to get to though: you can fly from Aberdeen or take an overnight ferry from there. There's a ferry from Orkney to Shetland which takes about eight hours.

I would also recommend the coach trip to the far north of the islands, which went on Wednesdays when I did it (1999), ten hours round trip, during which you can have a drink at the northermost pub in the British Isles. (The Baltasound Hotel on Unst, though I understand the old radar station at Saxa Vord since then been turned into a tourism complex.)



I can vouch for this. There's a well-known SFF writer, born in Kilwinning, I'm thinking of, and he can be hard to understand at times, especially when he's had a bit to drink.

See also the 2002 film Sweet Sixteen, set in Greenock, which has twice been shown on British television with English subtitles throughout. (In the cinema it was just the first reel, with a note saying that you were on your own after that...)

You're right about Sweet Sixteen. I found a 10 minute sample that has French subtitles, and the subtitles are much easier to understand.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2a2jmA2ZNFk

mirandashell
04-05-2014, 03:47 PM
I do that, too. It can be darned embarrassing if people think I'm mocking them. Sigh.

You're right. More than once I've got into a tangle with someone thinking I'm taking the piss and I have no idea what I've just done until I replay the conversation in my head.

In fact, I still have little bits of the dialects of all the places I've lived in or people I've worked with. I still mix my pronouns in Bristolian fashion and I still say 'your man' instead of 'him' from when I lived in Dublin and I still say 'yoursen' instead of 'yourself' cos I once worked with a Yorkshireman. And all of those examples are from years ago. And they aren't the only ones. Certain words come out with an Eustary twang every now and again but at other times they won't. It's all unconsciously done and can depend on who I'm talking to.

Barbara R.
04-07-2014, 03:18 PM
I found an amazing site: a zine for, by, and about drunkards. And they posted this wonderful chart (http://www.moderndrunkardmagazine.com/issues/01-03/01-03-hardboiled-hooch.htm) about the drinks of choice of various fictional characters. Ever wonder what's in the bottle that ever self-respecting PI keeps in his lower left desk draw? Tough-guy detectives, it turns out, prefer rye. Carrie Bradshaw drinks Cosmopolitans, naturally. And so on. Have [hic] fun!

Cath
06-28-2014, 05:22 PM
Most lethal methods of suicide, rated by effectiveness, time, and agony: http://lostallhope.com/suicide-methods/statistics-most-lethal-methods

cmhbob
07-10-2014, 02:12 AM
This page has photos of a variety of ammunition cartridges placed side-by-side for comparison. Near the bottom, there's also a couple of images of shotgun ammunition as well as a comparison of choke patterns.

Placing it here for its research value, not a gun discussion.

http://herohog.com/images/guns/ammo/

WeaselFire
08-10-2014, 08:04 PM
The MOIA (http://moia.org/) is your friend here. Technically back spatter, blood patterns can be used to determine a shooter's distance. Check the report:

http://www.moia.org/news/bsp1012.pdf

Jeff

Trebor1415
11-17-2014, 07:17 AM
There's no really good place to put this so I'll start a thread. The mods might want to look at this to see if it should be stickied.

This is a site with archives from old magazines, dating back to around the turn of the 19th/20th Century. You can search by subject.

I can see how this can be useful in so many ways that I wanted to share it. Besides the articles, look at the ads.

http://www.oldmagazinearticles.com/recent.php#.VGloNMlNeew

chompers
11-17-2014, 10:12 AM
Thank you for this!

sabindanjoup
11-17-2014, 10:42 AM
Thanks very much

Cath
11-17-2014, 03:27 PM
This fits right in with the useful research links thread! Thanks

Drachen Jager
11-27-2014, 09:18 PM
This is what a city looks like after it's been abandoned.

Drone flyovers of Pripyat (city near Chernobyl).

Beautiful, creepy, and very atmospheric.

http://vimeo.com/112681885

Trebor1415
04-22-2015, 12:47 AM
Here's a very good article on some of the problems of forensic evidence. The basic gist is that the field was developed by law enforcement to help get convictions, not scientists, and how this has caused problems.

This is a must read for anyone writing crime fiction or some thrillers. Make sure to follow the links in the article for more info on specific things like arson investigations, the problems with "shaken baby syndrome" and other issues.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-watch/wp/2015/04/21/a-brief-history-of-forensics/

WeaselFire
06-12-2015, 07:17 PM
There have been a number of questions by writers unfamiliar with firearms about operating an AR-15 semi-automatic rifle. A decent entry-level video on the basic operation and disassembly/cleaning can be found at:

https://youtu.be/PFFN_j3WD80

Jeff

onesecondglance
12-22-2015, 04:48 PM
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-34810412

Interesting article gathering various incidents that have happened on spacewalks.

Snitchcat
08-21-2016, 09:14 PM
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/funder/nasa/

All of NASA's publicly-funded research -- free.

Snitchcat
09-10-2016, 06:33 AM
London Plague Pits -- Myth or Fact?

Linked article is a good starting point for such research:

http://www.bbc.com/autos/story/20160906-plague-pits-the-london-underground-and-crossrail

borogove
06-15-2017, 06:06 PM
Google recently launched a new fashion archive, We Wear Culture (https://www.google.com/culturalinstitute/beta/project/fashion), which looks fantastic for those of us who nerd out over outfit details and historical authenticity:

"More than 180 museums, fashion institutions, schools, archives and other organizations from the fashion hubs of New York, London, Paris, Tokyo, São Paulo and elsewhere came together to put three millennia of fashion at your fingertips. You can browse 30,000 fashion pieces: try searching for hats and sort them by color or shoes by time. In 450+ exhibits, you can find stories from the ancient Silk Road to the ferocious fashion of the British punk. Or meet icons and trendsetters like Coco Chanel, Cristóbal Balenciaga, Yves Saint Laurent or Vivienne Westwood."

snafu1056
05-23-2018, 10:53 PM
Here's a handy map to have. It shows all the trade routes of the known world in the 11th & 12th century

https://easyzoom.com/imageaccess/ec482e04c2b240d4969c14156bb6836f

Cindyt
06-20-2018, 11:30 AM
I found an awesome site with quotes about tons of subjects - Acting, love, fate. Many of them are in the public domain.

http://www.wiseoldsayings.com/