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Lyxdeslic
04-14-2007, 04:51 AM
Hello/g'day,

In my current wip I have a chapter with a character -- who is a contemptuous ass -- from Australia. Please let me know if the following lines of dialogue ring true. And, bear in mind that, again, this guy is a scumbag of the worst sort; hence the overexaggerative slang.

“Oh, well, will you look at this. Isn’t this a beaut’. Apparently some bodgy bloke has gone and bingled up the highway,” Lachlan relayed with over exaggerative frustration at the sight of the crash just up ahead.

“Root it all to hell! Now it’s London-to-a-brick that I won’t get home in time for the football match!”

“All because of my dill of a Sheila and her little ankle-biter back there!”

“Well, will you look at this clacker with the exy suit! A right figjam this one is, eh!”

“Well? Don’t just stay perched there, you clacker! Show me your blood’s worth bottling and get me some help before I cark it right here on the spot!”

It’s you, you rootin’ anus! Now go ring me the ambulance officers, ya’ blubbery date!”

Thanks, to all, in advance.

Lyx

veinglory
04-14-2007, 04:54 AM
bodgy, bingled, figjam, clacker, exy etc all do nothing for me as the Kiwi offspring of Australians. Sheila is another one only here used in jest. Even though their are cultural sayings people don't tend to use them all at once?

Lyxdeslic
04-14-2007, 04:59 AM
bodgy, bingled, figjam, clacker, exy etc all do nothing for me as the Kiwi offspring of Australians. Sheila is another one only here used in jest. Even though their are cultural sayings people don't tend to use them all at once?

Thanks, Vein. I certainly don't want to come across as an ignorant American trying too hard.

Lyx

veinglory
04-14-2007, 05:05 AM
I am sure a 100% Aussie will be by with suggestions.

pdr
04-14-2007, 05:22 AM
Too much and too many words.

Think laconic. Pick your words carefully. And you do need to use bloody and bastard. Some of your expressions - little ankle-biter, and I cark it are used by the Kiwis and British.

He might be a right bastard but he won't be a motor mouth. That's how we antipodeans stereotype Americans!

football match!” Tut! Any antipodean says 'for the footy'.
the ambulance officers, often called 'Zambucks'.

Lyxdeslic
04-14-2007, 05:30 AM
Too much and too many words.

Think laconic. Pick your words carefully. And you do need to use bloody and bastard. Some of your expressions - little ankle-biter, and I cark it are used by the Kiwis and British.

He might be a right bastard but he won't be a motor mouth. That's how we antipodeans stereotype Americans!

football match!” Tut! Any antipodean says 'for the footy'.
the ambulance officers, often called 'Zambucks'.
Thanks so much, pdr. You're input (and this board as a whole) is extremely valued.

Lyx

Rosamund
04-14-2007, 09:05 PM
Hello, Aussie here.


“Oh, well, will you look at this. Isn’t this a beaut’. Apparently some bodgy bloke has gone and bingled up the highway,” Lachlan relayed with over exaggerative frustration at the sight of the crash just up ahead.
What I hear every day: 'Oh, great. Some dickhead's gone and pranged himself and buggered up the highway.'


“Root it all to hell! Now it’s London-to-a-brick that I won’t get home in time for the football match!”
What I would hear: 'Bloody hell! Now I won't get home before the footy starts.'
Bloody is the great Australian swear word. You can't over-use it. I've never heard the expression in your last sentence.


“All because of my dill of a Sheila and her little ankle-biter back there!”
What I would hear:'All because of the wife and her brat'.
'Ankle-biter' is affectionate. I have never heard 'Shelia' used in this context. Incidentally, I've never heard a bloke mention his wife in this situation - they are usually too focused on missing the footy to have any room for other thoughts.


“Well, will you look at this clacker with the exy suit! A right figjam this one is, eh!”
I have no idea what this means. I've never come across these words before.


“Well? Don’t just stay perched there, you clacker! Show me your blood’s worth bottling and get me some help before I cark it right here on the spot!”
I'm assuming that 'clacker' means someone who is talking a lot, as I've never actually heard this term before.
What I would hear: 'Don't just sit there. Get off your fat arse and get some help before -' I've stopped it here as I'm not sure why he would be talking about dying just because he is sitting in a traffic jam. More typical would be:'Stop yakking away there, get off your fat arse and get me some help! The footy starts in ten minutes! Bloody hell!'
'Your blood's worth bottling' is said as a way of expressing gratitude and thanks to someone, not as you have used it (yes, we're strange).


It’s you, you rootin’ anus! Now go ring me the ambulance officers, ya’ blubbery date!”

What I would hear: 'It's you, you fuckwit. Now go and ring the bloody ambos so they can bloody well get here and I can go home and watch the footy!' I have never heard the two expressions you use in this sentence, so I swapped them for things I have heard.

I hope this helps.

Incidentally, where in Australia is this guy from? Because that will make a huge difference as to what sort of expressions he uses.

Contrary to what has been said above, I've never heard ambulance officers called 'Zambucks', only 'ambos'. It could be one of those region-specific words we have. I agree that 'the footy' is the only way to refer to football. I am wondering what code this guy supports - just out of curiosity. :)

I should also add that my examples are for a fairly well educated, middle-class person. Someone who has not finished high school and/or who is from a lower or higher class will also speak differently.

Lyxdeslic
04-15-2007, 12:02 AM
Hello, Aussie here.


What I hear every day: 'Oh, great. Some dickhead's gone and pranged himself and buggered up the highway.'


What I would hear: 'Bloody hell! Now I won't get home before the footy starts.'
Bloody is the great Australian swear word. You can't over-use it. I've never heard the expression in your last sentence.


What I would hear:'All because of the wife and her brat'.
'Ankle-biter' is affectionate. I have never heard 'Shelia' used in this context. Incidentally, I've never heard a bloke mention his wife in this situation - they are usually too focused on missing the footy to have any room for other thoughts.


I have no idea what this means. I've never come across these words before.


I'm assuming that 'clacker' means someone who is talking a lot, as I've never actually heard this term before.
What I would hear: 'Don't just sit there. Get off your fat arse and get some help before -' I've stopped it here as I'm not sure why he would be talking about dying just because he is sitting in a traffic jam. More typical would be:'Stop yakking away there, get off your fat arse and get me some help! The footy starts in ten minutes! Bloody hell!'
'Your blood's worth bottling' is said as a way of expressing gratitude and thanks to someone, not as you have used it (yes, we're strange).


What I would hear: 'It's you, you fuckwit. Now go and ring the bloody ambos so they can bloody well get here and I can go home and watch the footy!' I have never heard the two expressions you use in this sentence, so I swapped them for things I have heard.

I hope this helps.

Incidentally, where in Australia is this guy from? Because that will make a huge difference as to what sort of expressions he uses.

Contrary to what has been said above, I've never heard ambulance officers called 'Zambucks', only 'ambos'. It could be one of those region-specific words we have. I agree that 'the footy' is the only way to refer to football. I am wondering what code this guy supports - just out of curiosity. :)

I should also add that my examples are for a fairly well educated, middle-class person. Someone who has not finished high school and/or who is from a lower or higher class will also speak differently.
Awesome, Rosamund! Thanks so much for taking the time to do this. Excellent feedback. :)

Two points, since you brought them up, I'll clarify. a) These are snippets of dialogue that appear throughout the chapter rather than sequential converse. In other words, it's not one subject of conversation but rather it is many. b) Clacker -- I gleaned the majority of my grossly misused Aussie verbs, nouns and adjectives from http://www.koalanet.com.au/australian-slang.html. According to this website, clacker means pretty much the same thing as "Date" or "Arse-hole". :) Excuse my...well...not french in this case. :)

Again, thanks for all of the valuable details you've provided. You've given me much to go on for my re-write of this scene.

Lyx

veinglory
04-15-2007, 01:50 AM
I read those slang lists from time to time and they tend to mangle things 9 times out of 10 ;)

licity-lieu
04-15-2007, 02:45 AM
Hey Lyxdeslic- I loved your dialogue! I would have to agree with my fellow Aussie AWs though. You would never hear all of those words together unless you wanted to write a script for a comedy routine about outback life. I dont even think Paul Hogan would carry on like that any more *cringe* I'd stick with "Bloody hell", "dickhead" and "fuckwit". Oh and I think "clacker" refers to a woman's vaginal/bumhole region, as in "bloody hell these undies keep riding up my clacker!" Also instead of "root it all to hell"-I'd say "fuckit all to hell". Bloke is good-you can never over use that.
Beauty mate, check ya later :Thumbs:

Another thought: You could also never over use the expression 'Geez' as in ' Geez mate, I'm goin' to be late for the footy' or you could keep it simple and opt for plain ole' Geeezusss'.

pdr
04-15-2007, 04:34 AM
A Zambuck is a St John's First Aider. You still hear them called that in NZ in the RSA. (Returned Servicemen's Association.) According to the Dict it's an Oz term too.

Lyxdeslic
04-15-2007, 09:56 PM
Thanks again, blokes and shielas (trying to be funny...not ignorant). :)

With the help you've provided, hopefully my scene will be improved a thousand fold.

All of you are awesome. What else can I say?

Lyx

Mac H.
04-16-2007, 02:38 AM
Whoever wrote that list of 'Aussie' expressions is havin' a lend of ya.

'London to a brick' ?
'A right figjam this one is' ?

I can't even imagine Steve Irwin saying that.

Here's an example of how Aussies talk: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ew7TweHy8O0

Mac
(PS: Yes, it that is a legal video. The ABC actually encourages clips to be put on YouTube. eg: http://www.news.com.au/story/0,23599,21556835-2,00.html

YouTube was incorrectly taking down the clips because a 14 year old kid with a hotmail address who claimed to represent 'The Australien Brodcasting Corperation' (sic) told them to. Wow. Credibility!)

poetinahat
04-16-2007, 04:00 AM
Blow-in here -- I'm only a transplanted Yank (thirteen years now).

I've never heard Zambuck, but ambo I have heard. The other feedback rings true - mainly, pdr's guiding principle of fewer words, and Rosamund's point that it makes a big difference where in Australia these people are from.

I don't know if the website explains it, but 'figjam' stands for "fuck, I'm good; just ask me". I've never heard it used in real life, but I think I've seen it on a coffee mug.

scarletpeaches
04-16-2007, 04:01 AM
You're a Yank!

Aw hell, I've gone right off you now. :D

Mandy-Jane
04-16-2007, 05:06 AM
Hi Lyx

I'm Australian too, and I have to say I agree with everything that's been said here. The only thing I can add is that a really good expression (well not really good; in fact I hate it, but it gets used a lot) for "sheila" (which I assume is his wife or partner) is "missus" - as in "all because of the missus and the kid".

And you definitely must say "ambos" for ambulance drivers. Every single person in the country says it. I've never heard it said as anything else.

And your line about the clackers and the exy suit? I don't understand that. If you let me know what he's trying to say, I'll try and re-word it for you.

JJ Cooper
04-16-2007, 06:05 AM
“Oh, well, will you look at this. Isn’t this a beaut’. Apparently some bodgy bloke has gone and bingled up the highway,” Lachlan relayed with over exaggerative frustration at the sight of the crash just up ahead.

"Shit. Just my luck."


“Root it all to hell! Now it’s London-to-a-brick that I won’t get home in time for the football match!”

"Christ almighty. I won't make it home in time for the footy.


“All because of my dill of a Sheila and her little ankle-biter back there!”

"All because of my other-half and her ankle-biter."


“Well, will you look at this clacker with the exy suit! A right figjam this one is, eh!”

"Will you look at this goose in the suit. Thinks his shit don't stink."


“Well? Don’t just stay perched there, you clacker! Show me your blood’s worth bottling and get me some help before I cark it right here on the spot!”

"Don't just sit there looking stupid. Get off your arse and get me some help before I kick the bucket right here. I swear you're slower than a wet week."


It’s you, you rootin’ anus! Now go ring me the ambulance officers, ya’ blubbery date!”

"Crap, it's you. Go and ring the Ambo's, sunshine."


Thanks, to all, in advance.Lyx

"Thanks mate."

JJ

Lyxdeslic
04-16-2007, 06:20 AM
Whoever wrote that list of 'Aussie' expressions is havin' a lend of ya.

'London to a brick' ?
'A right figjam this one is' ?

I can't even imagine Steve Irwin saying that.

Here's an example of how Aussies talk: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ew7TweHy8O0

Mac
(PS: Yes, it that is a legal video. The ABC actually encourages clips to be put on YouTube. eg: http://www.news.com.au/story/0,23599,21556835-2,00.html

YouTube was incorrectly taking down the clips because a 14 year old kid with a hotmail address who claimed to represent 'The Australien Brodcasting Corperation' (sic) told them to. Wow. Credibility!)
Thanks, Mac. Tried the link but they must have removed the clip as it won't load.


Blow-in here -- I'm only a transplanted Yank (thirteen years now).

I've never heard Zambuck, but ambo I have heard. The other feedback rings true - mainly, pdr's guiding principle of fewer words, and Rosamund's point that it makes a big difference where in Australia these people are from.

I don't know if the website explains it, but 'figjam' stands for "fuck, I'm good; just ask me". I've never heard it used in real life, but I think I've seen it on a coffee mug.
Thanks, Poet. The general concensus is ambo, so that's what it looks like I'll go with. And, yeah, the "F.I.G.J.A.M." reference was intended as you defined. I love it and it fits; yet I can't use it 'cause...well...aussies don't use it. Damnit, you guys, start usin' it. It's an awesome line. If you all start using it, then in a couple of years when I get my book published (yeah, right) it will be a popular phrase. :)


You're a Yank!

Aw hell, I've gone right off you now. :D
Yeah, but he defected. That's gotta' count for somethin', no? :)

Lyxdeslic
04-16-2007, 06:24 AM
Hi Lyx

I'm Australian too, and I have to say I agree with everything that's been said here. The only thing I can add is that a really good expression (well not really good; in fact I hate it, but it gets used a lot) for "sheila" (which I assume is his wife or partner) is "missus" - as in "all because of the missus and the kid".

And you definitely must say "ambos" for ambulance drivers. Every single person in the country says it. I've never heard it said as anything else.

And your line about the clackers and the exy suit? I don't understand that. If you let me know what he's trying to say, I'll try and re-word it for you.
Thanks, Mandy. Very helpful indeed. Ambos has enough votes for me now, definitely.

With the line about the "clacker in the exy suit", I was trying to say the asshole in the big shot/fancy suit. Seeing that I've failed, miserably...I'd love some other options.

Thanks again.

Lyx

Lyxdeslic
04-16-2007, 06:29 AM
"Shit. Just my luck."



"Christ almighty. I won't make it home in time for the footy.



"All because of my other-half and her ankle-biter."



"Will you look at this goose in the suit. Thinks his shit don't stink."



"Don't just sit there looking stupid. Get off your arse and get me some help before I kick the bucket right here. I swear you're slower than a wet week."



"Crap, it's you. Go and ring the Ambo's, sunshine."



"Thanks mate."

JJ
Wow, JJ, tons of thanks on this one. Love the "go and ring the Ambo's, sunshine" rewrite. :)

Lyx

JJ Cooper
04-16-2007, 06:35 AM
No worries mate.

JJ

poetinahat
04-16-2007, 06:54 AM
No worries mate.

JJ
Right -- like anybody ever says that. Strewth. ;)


(They do, but it comes out more like "nah wurries".)

JJ Cooper
04-16-2007, 07:13 AM
How about a recent Aussie advertising campaign that was shown in England. A young Aussie model in a bikini on a beach looking into the camera and saying - "So where the bloody hell are you?" For some reason the poms didn't like it.

JJ

Mandy-Jane
04-16-2007, 07:39 AM
With the line about the "clacker in the exy suit", I was trying to say the asshole in the big shot/fancy suit. Seeing that I've failed, miserably...I'd love some other options.

Thanks again.

Lyx


How about something like:

"the dickhead in the bag of fruit" (Aussie rhyming slang for suit)

"the dickhead/loser/idiot, etc.... all decked out like a Christmas tree" (don't know how common it is, but I've heard it said. In any case "all decked out" is a true aussie saying.

Mandy

Jo
04-16-2007, 08:53 AM
Hi Lyx.

You're getting some great suggestions here, and not to be left out, here's mine for the suit ;) :




“Well, will you look at this clacker with the exy suit! A right figjam this one is, eh!”

Check out the penguin. What a wanker.

or

Check out the wanker in the penguin suit.

licity-lieu
04-16-2007, 12:08 PM
Or howbout..

yuppie wanker or, given that most wankers wear suits, just wanker!

sorry suits :poke:

Rosamund
04-16-2007, 05:25 PM
Wanker sounds good to this aussie.

The guys I know wouldn't even notice what sort of a suit it was, so I don't have an expression for that, I'm afraid.

Where I live in Oz, a penguin suit is a tux, not a business suit. I've never heard 'bag of fruit' for 'suit' - where are they saying that? *is genuinely curious, not being critical*

I have heard (and used) expressions like 'thinks if he bends over the sun shines', or 'so far up himself he can't see daylight' (that's the polite version). 'Wanker' covers all that and more for me. It's such a connotative word.

Lyxdeslic
04-17-2007, 05:02 AM
Really, thanks again to everyone who has provided feedback. I imagine I will glean: Footy, Wanker, and Ambos.

Also, thanks for not making me feel like an ignorant Yank. It could've been worse though, right? I could've used dialogue like "crikey, let's put another shrimp on the barbie" or "toss me a Foster's so I can have a guzzle while I watch soccer". :)

Lyx

pdr
04-17-2007, 07:41 AM
you don't actually think that footy = soccer?

My God! No, surely not!

veinglory
04-17-2007, 07:46 AM
Indeed, footy is soccer in the UK. In Aus it is one of the rugby games--probably Aussie Rules.

poetinahat
04-17-2007, 08:00 AM
Over here, 'footy' is generally Aussie Rules or rugby league. It *could* extend to rugby union, but you seldom hear the rah-rahs refer to their sport that way.

Funnily enough, the national soccer organisation took a decision a couple years ago to call their sport 'football', in line with most of the rest of the world. However, the national team is still called the Socceroos (which was daft then and is even more so now).

Mandy-Jane
04-17-2007, 08:05 AM
Indeed, footy is soccer in the UK. In Aus it is one of the rugby games--probably Aussie Rules.

Yes, but Aussie Rules isn't rugby. It's football. In my mind, football and rugby are two totally different things.

(yes I am an Aussie Rules fanatic. I love it!)

JJ Cooper
04-17-2007, 08:08 AM
Or howbout..

yuppie wanker or, given that most wankers wear suits, just wanker!

sorry suits :poke:

That hurts. Although I have been called a corporate wanker.:cry:

I need to get published so I don't have to wear this suit anymore.

JJ

Jo
04-17-2007, 08:31 AM
Yes, but Aussie Rules isn't rugby. It's football. In my mind, football and rugby are two totally different things.

(yes I am an Aussie Rules fanatic. I love it!)

Hey MJ, I'm with you there. Unfortunately, the supporters up here in Queensland, where rugby rules *cough, splutter*, call "tackleball", footy. Argh!

For some Aussie Rules perving pleasure: http://afl.com.au/

poetinahat
04-17-2007, 08:40 AM
A mate of mine calls Aussie rules "two-and-a-half hours of knock-ons". (Guess which sport he played in school?)

Truly, Aussie Rules is a game that is best seen live; TV doesn't do it justice.

pdr
04-17-2007, 09:09 AM
soccer is football to the lower classes in the UK, Veinglory. Who have you been mixing with? :)

If you attended public school in the UK (i.e.private in American terms) or are a member of the upper middle and upper classes you play rugby and it's called football. Soccer is soccer.

In the north Rugby League is called football too.

In Oz you have footy which is Oz Rules, League or Union and soccer.
And what is wrong with socceroos? You're a Yank, Poet, and don't see the implications do you? It's a bloody good name for what soccer players do.

JJ Cooper
04-17-2007, 09:15 AM
Hey MJ, I'm with you there. Unfortunately, the supporters up here in Queensland, where rugby rules *cough, splutter*, call "tackleball", footy. Argh!

For some Aussie Rules perving pleasure: http://afl.com.au/

You'll be sent away from our sacred State soon if you keep that up Jodi. Good to hear from someone else living in the Sunshine State.

JJ

poetinahat
04-17-2007, 09:20 AM
And what is wrong with socceroos? You're a Yank, Poet, and don't see the implications do you? It's a bloody good name for what soccer players do.
pdr, please don't tell me what I see and what I don't.

My point was that the governing association has mandated that the game will be referred to as football, rather than soccer. So, they themselves have said that the players are football players.

Yet the national team retains the term "soccer" in its name, which contradicts the direction set by the governing board -- to use the term 'football'. That's all I said.

Now, back to the thread.

scarletpeaches
04-17-2007, 09:26 AM
soccer is football to the lower classes in the UK, Veinglory. Who have you been mixing with? :)

If you attended public school in the UK (i.e.private in American terms) or are a member of the upper middle and upper classes you play rugby and it's called football. Soccer is soccer.

In the north Rugby League is called football too.

In Oz you have footy which is Oz Rules, League or Union and soccer.
And what is wrong with socceroos? You're a Yank, Poet, and don't see the implications do you? It's a bloody good name for what soccer players do.

Football and rugby are two different games and I don't know of anyone in the UK who is so class-conscious as to assert only the 'lower classes' call football, football.

Never heard of FIFA?

And it's not just the upper classes who play rugby.

Never heard of Jonny Wilkinson?

Jo
04-17-2007, 09:33 AM
You'll be sent away from our sacred State soon if you keep that up Jodi. Good to hear from someone else living in the Sunshine State.

JJ

Ah, someone who appreciates the finer weather in life! Hiya JJ.

As for the footy--well, it gets worse. Hubby is a mad keen Man U supporter (UK parents). But I guess we could get a game going... you throw the ball (backwards), I'll mark it and kick it past (over) hubby in goals... :tongue

JJ Cooper
04-17-2007, 09:35 AM
Jonny Wilkinson

This name is banned in Australia.

JJ

scarletpeaches
04-17-2007, 09:45 AM
I was as ticked off as you, JJ...I'm a Scot, remember! :D

pdr
04-17-2007, 12:01 PM
Now where's your sense of humour there, Poet or Scarlet!

poetinahat
04-17-2007, 12:05 PM
Oh, NO. :e2smack:

Stitched up with irony... by a Kiwi! *shakes head*

I guess I'm still more Yank than I thought. ;)

Lyxdeslic
04-17-2007, 12:34 PM
Looks like I sparked quite the argument. :)

Another dumbass American sticks his foot in his mouth and starts a war. I learned it by watching bush, all right! :)

Lyx

P.S.
So let me get this straight...footy = cricket?

Editing to let everyone know that I was going to fix the capatilization on "bush", then thought the better of it as he truly is the definition of the previous mentioned -- "Wanker". :)

licity-lieu
04-17-2007, 12:43 PM
OMG if there is one thing worse than footy it would have to be cricket.:box:
He he... stick that in ya pipes and smoke it.

scarletpeaches
04-17-2007, 12:47 PM
If there's one thing worse than cricket it would have to be golf.

Lyxdeslic
04-17-2007, 12:48 PM
If there's one thing worse than cricket it would have to be golf.
Gasp!!! Blasphemer! And you call yourself a Scotswoman. :)

licity-lieu
04-17-2007, 01:07 PM
ppfff... yeah, golf tops the bloody lot!!

JJ Cooper
04-17-2007, 02:28 PM
Looks like I sparked quite the argument. :)

No, just Aussies at our stirring best. Google - World Cup Cricket 2007 and have a look at the points table (cringe as I write as the final has not been played yet). I think our golfers are doing ok around the world at the moment. Next week (ANZAC day) we are going to kick some Kiwi butt in the Rugby League (cringe again).

JJ

waylander
04-17-2007, 04:24 PM
[quote=pdr;1271958]soccer is football to the lower classes in the UK, Veinglory. Who have you been mixing with? :)

If you attended public school in the UK (i.e.private in American terms) or are a member of the upper middle and upper classes you play rugby and it's called football. Soccer is soccer.[quote]

Not all of us. Some of the schools have their own versions of football

pdr
04-18-2007, 07:36 AM
In this not-very-serious-thread, with quite a few other antipodeans sharing the fun, I simply let a little of the old kiwi irony slip.

I can never get those emoticon things to work and anyway half the fun is watching the 'trout' rise!

The joke re socceroos via a team of Oz comedians is this. Have you ever watch kangeroos leap about? Or get into each other's faces via a hug/grasp hold before they box? Do they remind you of any sports people?

As for the class thing, sorry SP, you couldn't hear my accent and emphasis! Don't you know that Kiwis are the worst of inverted snobs!

Oh, and who made that crack about cricket? How dare you. The sacred amateurs' game and isn't it still? Look at the Irish am. team beating two major teams in the world cup games!

And as for that coment about the Oz team in League. Shall I whisper All Blacks and Black Caps?

poetinahat
04-18-2007, 07:45 AM
(psst... the NZ rugby league side is the Kiwis; the All Blacks are the Union side)

licity-lieu
04-18-2007, 08:56 AM
:Lecture: typical. I finally find a thread with some homegrown content and it gets all sporty and such. Surely we antipodeans can rustle up some better convo than this....ghaarrr..... youse are all :crazy:

licity-lieu
04-18-2007, 08:59 AM
:D :D lurv these emoticons btw

Jo
04-18-2007, 10:34 AM
:Lecture: typical. I finally find a thread with some homegrown content and it gets all sporty and such. Surely we antipodeans can rustle up some better convo than this....ghaarrr..... youse are all :crazy:

*bows* Thank you. :tongue

I've tried a bit of homegrown convo on here. Alas, even with Poet as my international interpreter, the masses were gobsmacked. Where were you guys? LOL!

(Sample from last year's Office Party Royalty for a Week thread here (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showpost.php?p=561864&postcount=588).)

pdr
04-18-2007, 11:59 AM
(psst... the NZ rugby league side is the Kiwis; the All Blacks are the Union side)

You don't say!

Catch up here, poet! The Oz League team will probably beat the Kiwis, but the All Blacks have already and will beat the Oz team.
Ditto Black Caps.
And you're in Oz. Tut! I know that and I'm stuck over here in Japan.

Hey, want to talk Antipodean some more? How about coming to the short story writing studio thread and talking about the state of short story markets in Oz. All my favourite lit ones seem to have folded or closed to subs for the moment.