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TwentyFour
04-04-2007, 08:58 AM
cc

The_Grand_Duchess
04-04-2007, 09:04 AM
I would think that the 'watchdogs' would still caution people against them becuase its still a bad deal. I imagine that despite this people would still go with them. I mean, look at the staggering evidence provided against them in this place and yet even after reading it people still choose to "work" with them.

I actully had someone say that to me. She was at an early stage and could still get out with her work but she, even after reading through a few of these threads decided to stick with them and "Make it work".

PA is kinda like an abusive relationship. . .

The_Grand_Duchess
04-04-2007, 09:26 AM
I like the line "Our goal is to publish works of authors who had no other chance,". That says a lot.

James D. Macdonald
04-04-2007, 03:00 PM
Not everyone is offered a chance to publish through PublishAmerica, he said.

That's because there aren't enough hours in the day to publish everything that's submitted with the staff they have on hand.

I'm told that they also reject works that have characters named Larry, Willem, or Miranda, use the words "stooge" or "scam," and/or are less that 6,500 words.

Rolling Thunder
04-04-2007, 03:23 PM
In that article, I counted the word 'publish' 61 times (in various forms of PublishAmerica, publishing, etc)

I counted the word 'print' using the same manner.

They can't escape the vanity publisher tag, so serious writers would probably still avoid them.

James D. Macdonald
04-04-2007, 05:34 PM
If PA dropped all the false and misleading advertising and told the straight-up honest truth about themselves, I'd stop calling them scammers. But I still wouldn't say that going with them would be a good idea outside of certain very-narrowly defined situations.

The_Grand_Duchess
04-04-2007, 06:45 PM
If PA dropped all the false and misleading advertising and told the straight-up honest truth about themselves, I'd stop calling them scammers. But I still wouldn't say that going with them would be a good idea outside of certain very-narrowly defined situations.

Such as Nazi hate lit? Just out of curiosty what would you recommend them for if they were honest?

Rolling Thunder
04-04-2007, 06:53 PM
Cereal boxes?

James D. Macdonald
04-04-2007, 07:05 PM
The narrowly-defined situations?

People who want a printer, don't want to hassle in any way -- and are willing to pay extra for the convenience.

zizban
04-04-2007, 07:35 PM
Grandma's memoirs, writing you want bound and given to your children. My father left me a stack of his writing in his will. I would have loved to had it printed and bound.

janetbellinger
04-04-2007, 07:38 PM
Well, to be honest, I've seen books more overpriced than P.A.s books. An example is some of the self publishing companies. I would respect P. A if they said up front, "We are a vanity publisher." I still wouldn't use them, but I wouldn't criticise them.

Jamesaritchie
04-04-2007, 08:11 PM
Changed their contract from 7 years to 1?
Told people straight up that their books would be overpriced? or they would not be stocked in most bookstores? or said they would not "edit" but "spellcheck" only?
Took Traditional Publisher off their website?

Let's say PA changes all these things, would you say..."Okay, they are being honest and are there should be no reason to dislike them?

If they were honest, why would anyone want to buy a book published by them? Being honest wouldn't make the quality of the books they publish go up one bit, but now readers would know how rotten they are without the need to spend money to learn.

Celia Cyanide
04-04-2007, 08:19 PM
If PA dropped all the false and misleading advertising and told the straight-up honest truth about themselves, I'd stop calling them scammers. But I still wouldn't say that going with them would be a good idea outside of certain very-narrowly defined situations.

That's what I say, too. The real problem is that they lie to people, and make the writers believe they have been published, when they haven't. There is nothing wrong with a vanity press, if the writer knows that's what it is. But I still wouldn't recommend it, because there are other vanity presses who are more economical for writers.

brianm
04-04-2007, 08:27 PM
If PA dropped all the false and misleading advertising and told the straight-up honest truth about themselves, I'd stop calling them scammers. But I still wouldn't say that going with them would be a good idea outside of certain very-narrowly defined situations.

My same thoughts.


Well, to be honest, I've seen books more overpriced than P.A.s books. An example is some of the self publishing companies. I would respect P. A if they said up front, "We are a vanity publisher." I still wouldn't use them, but I wouldn't criticise them.

I wouldn't respect them because of their past history, but I would stop calling them a scammer.


If they were honest, why would anyone want to buy a book published by them? Being honest wouldn't make the quality of the books they publish go up one bit, but now readers would know how rotten they are without the need to spend money to learn.

And aspiring, serious writers would not be caught up in their net of deceit.


There is nothing wrong with a vanity press, if the writer knows that's what it is. But I still wouldn't recommend it, because there are other vanity presses who are more economical for writers.

Like Lulu.

PA won't change its feathers. It was born a buzzard, and a buzzard it will remain.

James D. Macdonald
04-04-2007, 10:09 PM
If they were honest, why would anyone want to buy a book published by them?

Mom and Dad and Aunt Sue and the author himself will still buy just about as many as they do right now.

Angelinity
04-04-2007, 10:25 PM
like all scavengers, PA serve a purpose. Beware the passer-by.

benbradley
04-04-2007, 10:29 PM
... or said they would not "edit" but "spellcheck" only?
From what I've read about PublishAmerica, I wouldn't trust them to spellcheck a grocery list.

Saundra Julian
04-04-2007, 11:37 PM
Problem there, southernwriter, is PA ADDS mistakes to your m/s before printing. Thanks partly to Word's good ole grammar check!

Unimportant
04-05-2007, 12:56 AM
Does PA require the victim -- er, the author, to register the copyright before they move ahead with printing the author's two free copies and sending out that unholy one dollar note? Yes, yes, I *know* PA are the most heinous villains on the planet, but... if I were to put together all my favourite recipes, and submit it to them, could I get two free printed, bound copies of My Very Own Cookbook, plus a dollar, at no cost to myself? Or would it cost me the copyright registration fee (in which case the local printing/binding shop would be cheaper).

BenPanced
04-05-2007, 01:04 AM
Yes, Unimportant, the copyright registration is the author's responsibility.

Jersey Chick
04-05-2007, 01:45 AM
So if everyone knew they did not edit (perhaps if they listed it in the FAQ), it might help others who are published there to check their own work.


Ah, but if you look at the message boards, very few of them are troubled by the mistakes. After all, "there are mistakes in every book, even by the big name-authors." It does happen sometimes, but somehow, I don't think Grisham's publisher is adding more.

benbradley
04-05-2007, 02:24 AM
Yes, Unimportant, the copyright registration is the author's responsibility.
So does the author need to submit proof to PA that the copyright has been registered? I've read in songwriting forums that it takes many months to get a verification note back from the US Copyright Office that you've registered a copyright. It seems this could slow down "the publishing process."

If proof is required, I certainly wouldn't recommend submitting a false statement to PA just to get two free copies of a book (and a dollar). Perish the thought...

tlblack
04-05-2007, 03:29 AM
It takes approximately 8 months to get notification back from the copyright office that it's been registered. There are many PA authors who were clueless that they had to send two copies of their books along with the registration fee to the copyrights office. My guess would be that many PA authors never registered their copyright.

For those PA authors who read here... the copyright registrars office requires two copies in printed book form, the registration form and $45.

MMcC
04-05-2007, 04:22 AM
There are too many other publishers-on-demand who do it better. There isn't really a way for them to redeem themselves.

Not to mention past transgressions making them simply BAD PEOPLE.

Will I EVER buy dog food that got some of its ingredients from Menu Foods again? No. They'll go out of business. They should.

PA hasn't killed anyone yet (that we know of). That's the only reason they still exist. There are enough dim witted dreamers who are too slow to use Google effectively or too lazy to bother out there to keep them in business. It's not just that they're so incredibly damaging and BAD. It's that there are legitimate, safe, and non-abusive alternatives.

Which is why I have absolutely no pity for those who fall for the garbage spewed. They remind me too much of the morons who send their entire pention fund to a girl named Carmelita in an obscure location thousands of miles (and several borders) away so she can come to the US as Horny69Guy's new child bride. When HotCarmelita4U absconds with said retirement fun I actually think it's hysterical... and pretty fair.

DaveKuzminski
04-05-2007, 04:23 AM
It takes approximately 8 months to get notification back from the copyright office that it's been registered. There are many PA authors who were clueless that they had to send two copies of their books along with the registration fee to the copyrights office. My guess would be that many PA authors never registered their copyright.

For those PA authors who read here... the copyright registrars office requires two copies in printed book form, the registration form and $45.
Which only goes to show just how little PA actually knows about publishing even though they've now had almost eight years to learn. It's terrible that most writers learn more about publishing in eight weeks than PA has as a "publisher" in eight years.

By the way, our Anotherealm site is down, but our backup site remains up. It's at URL http://www.invirtuo.cc/prededitors/ for those who need to consult our listings. The two sites are identical except for one logo--our host's.

VGrossack
04-05-2007, 04:41 AM
They remind me too much of the morons who send their entire pention fund to a girl named Carmelita in an obscure location thousands of miles (and several borders) away so she can come to the US as Horny69Guy's new child bride. When HotCarmelita4U absconds with said retirement fun I actually think it's hysterical... and pretty fair.

I would think it was deserved as well, except that some of these men are slipping into senile dementia, and hoping for love - just once in their lives.

brianm
04-05-2007, 04:51 AM
Will I EVER buy dog food that got some of its ingredients from Menu Foods again? No. They'll go out of business. They should.

The company was provided with tainted wheat glutten. Do you think it fair that a company that has been successfully providing healthy meals for cats and dogs since 1971 go out of business because a supplier gave them tainted glutten? I don't.


PA hasn't killed anyone yet (that we know of). That's the only reason they still exist. There are enough dim witted dreamers who are too slow to use Google effectively or too lazy to bother out there to keep them in business. It's not just that they're so incredibly damaging and BAD. It's that there are legitimate, safe, and non-abusive alternatives.

Which is why I have absolutely no pity for those who fall for the garbage spewed. They remind me too much of the morons who send their entire pention fund to a girl named Carmelita in an obscure location thousands of miles (and several borders) away so she can come to the US as Horny69Guy's new child bride. When HotCarmelita4U absconds with said retirement fun I actually think it's hysterical... and pretty fair.

Not everyone is savvy when it comes to the Internet.

Calling people names like dim-witted and morons is very harsh.

The members of PA are not to blame. PA is the culprit. Judging fellow writers so harshly, IMO, is way out of line.

Jersey Chick
04-05-2007, 05:30 AM
I think there's a healthy dose of desperation in those authors. If you've been turned down by every other publishing house, and then come across PA - and they make you an offer... It's like the miracle cure.

The miracle cure that doesn't really exist.

PA kind of reminds me of snake-oil salesmen from the old west.

ccomer
04-05-2007, 05:59 AM
Let me ask you this. I was with PA. As you see, now I am not. so that makes me a dim witted and a moron? And I got one of those emails. This moron, deleted it.

spike
04-05-2007, 07:38 AM
Let me ask you this. I was with PA. As you see, now I am not. so that makes me a dim witted and a moron? And I got one of those emails. This moron, deleted it.

Please don't take offense. Most of us at AW DO NOT believe that any PA author is anything but a victim. No one should put you down because you fell for a scam from professional con men.

No one should make comments like that here. It's against the rules of AW.

James D. Macdonald
04-05-2007, 08:49 AM
Scammers stay in business because they work at being scammers. It's their job and they're good at it.

People fall for scams every day. Not because they're stupid, but because the scammer's story seems so plausible.

KCathy
04-05-2007, 09:46 AM
Isn't asking if PA would be accepted if they were honest kind of like asking if Hitler would be accepted if he were a nice guy? Or if a man with a peanut allergy would like peanut butter if there weren't any peanuts in it?

It doesn't really matter if the legitimate publishing world would accept them if they were legitimate. They AREN'T. That's kinda the whole point, isn't it?