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triceretops
03-28-2007, 11:56 PM
Which one is correct below? My editor is reg-flagging the first example. I didn't know there was supposed to be a space on either end of the m-dash. Also why would she tag words that I have underlined, for the purpose of stressing that word? I guess we have to use real italics now? I'm from the old typewriter days and never got out of the habit of underlining.




And the tie around his neck—it felt like an animal tether. (Incorrect?)

And the tie around his neck -- it felt like an animal tether. (correct ?)

He felt like a real idiot.

He felt like a real idiot.

I guessing this is her house style, or pretty much standard.

Tri

MidnightMuse
03-29-2007, 01:02 AM
I know the second one of your dashes is the right one - with -- in it is correct.

As for the italics - most of the submission guidelines I've come across tell you to underline anything you want italicised :Shrug:

triceretops
03-29-2007, 01:58 AM
Yeah, I always thought the underline was okay. It might have something to do with the house style or their computer system. I don't know. I do know that everyone of my underlined words are redflagged, and not for spelling or any other reason.

There are only two sentence that are high-light in yellow. From the looks of them, they appear to be redundant sentences, so I've omitted them.

And yes, I did email my editor yesterday--they haven't got back to me yet.

alleycat
03-29-2007, 02:21 AM
I'm guessing they're telling you not to use italic for emphasis except for a very good reason.

"He felt like a real idiot" doesn't really sound like it needs the emphasis.

triceretops
03-29-2007, 03:40 AM
I thought that too at first. But everyone of my underlines are red-flagged. I don't think she would disalow me the choice of putting stress on ALL my words. Anyway, I hope she clears up the mystery.

Tri

weatherfield
03-29-2007, 04:01 AM
According to the Chicago, there aren't supposed to be spaces on either side of the em-dash, so I don't know what to tell you as far as that goes. I'd ask for some clarity.

Jamesaritchie
03-29-2007, 05:44 PM
I thought that too at first. But everyone of my underlines are red-flagged. I don't think she would disalow me the choice of putting stress on ALL my words. Anyway, I hope she clears up the mystery.

Tri

It wouldn't make much sense to red flag them just because she doesn't like underlines. Flagging them doesn't turn them into italics. My guess is she simply does not like italicized words. Many editors do not, unless the words are for titles and the like where italics are mandatory.

But why don't you ask your editor these questions? That's what editors are for.

Medievalist
03-29-2007, 07:47 PM
Which one is correct below? My editor is reg-flagging the first example. I didn't know there was supposed to be a space on either end of the m-dash.

She flagged the em-dash because it's a real em-dash, the single high ASCII character; it's a non-standard character and can give the typesetter fits.

As a general note, there are two "styles" of em-dash. APA uses spaces before and after; MLA and Chicago do not.

Judg
03-29-2007, 08:05 PM
Medievalist, I am so glad to hear that. I always thought the spaces were wrong, and it bugged me. I found it illogical, so I put the spaces in anyway. Now I have an authority I can invoke. :)

Medievalist
03-29-2007, 08:07 PM
The APA folk favor the spaces for typesetting reasons; you've narrow columns in most magazines and newspapers, and the em-dash with spaces will break easily.

Judg
03-29-2007, 08:12 PM
Makes sense.

triceretops
03-29-2007, 11:40 PM
I'll be danged. I. Did. Not. Know. That. Apparently the APA is their prefered style, then. That's the only reason I can think of. Not only that, in correspondance from her, she uses that double space em-dash in her own writing. Alas, Canadian publishers do a few other things that are a mystery to me. She still hasn't gotten back to me yet. Anyway, I'll get it cleared up.

Here's another example that boggles me. Is the following sentence correct:

"How could you have done such a thing...?" She lowered her head.

I'm trailing off the sentence here with the "..." and adding a question mark at the end of it. Have you ever seen this done?



Thanks for all your help, people.

Tri

weatherfield
03-29-2007, 11:49 PM
I'd say the short answer is no, given your example. You can, in specific cases, use an ellipsis in conjunction with other punctuation, but there needs to be an omission in order for it to work.

"How could you have done such a thing?" is a complete sentence in and of itself. It seems that if someone were talking, they would technically be trailing away after the question mark was already implied by tone, so I would write it just as I have it above, without the ellipsis.

weatherfield
03-29-2007, 11:53 PM
Also (get ready for some punctuation-nit-picky-ness), an ellipsis demands a space between each dot, so it would really look like ". . ."

This has been a message from your friendly neighborhood grammar-checker :D

triceretops
03-30-2007, 12:01 AM
Uh, oh. Here I go again. Thanks for that heads up on the ellipsis. It seems my manuscript is a mongrel.

Tri

Medievalist
03-30-2007, 02:10 AM
You don't need the ellipsis there.

But.

There is an actual ellipsis character; no, I'm not tellin' you how to get it :D

It's a high ascii character, and it's different in different fonts. The typesetter and book designer may decide to use it, but generally speaking, it isn't used.

Most of the time the ellipsis is set with periods and non breaking spaces. so you don't end up with half of it on one line, and half on another.

There are two "styles" of ellipsis; those with leading and trailing spaces and those without--it's a matter of house style and religious preferences.

You can make your ellipsis with or without internal spaces, with or without out leading spaces, just be rigid and use one way all the time. Consistency is your friend, even if it's consistently wrong :D

Judg
03-30-2007, 03:31 AM
You don't need the ellipsis there.

But.

There is an actual ellipsis character; no, I'm not tellin' you how to get it :D
This is the kind of thing I tend to take as a personal challenge. So people, if you want the ASCII ellipsis character, press and hold down the Alt key and then type ON THE NUMBER PAD the sequence 0133, voilà, you get "…" If you type just 133, without the zero, you get the a with a grave accent, like in voilà. Fun, eh?

My last computer got hit hard by the Bugbear virus and I had to type half of the letters of the alphabet using the ASCII characters like that. Very, very annoying. But I have to admit, I never learned the ellipsis.

maestrowork
03-30-2007, 03:54 AM
Turn off the auto-replace function in Word, which automatically turns quotes to different directions, double dashes to em-dash, three dots to ... etc. It's better to just turn them off.

Medievalist
03-30-2007, 05:08 AM
This is the kind of thing I tend to take as a personal challenge. So people, if you want the ASCII ellipsis character, press and hold down the Alt key and then type ON THE NUMBER PAD the sequence 0133, voilà, you get "…" If you type just 133, without the zero, you get the a with a grave accent, like in voilà. Fun, eh?


Ah, but wait!

It's going to depend on the font, and the application; it's not the same in all cases :D

Judg
03-30-2007, 07:47 AM
LOL! Well, at least I tried …

Works in here, that's for sure.