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DeadlyAccurate
03-26-2007, 08:59 PM
I never felt this emotional rollercoaster as a computer programmer. And I made a helluva lot more money (for that matter, I made a helluva lot more money working the counter at McDonald's.)

So why, exactly, did I decide to be a writer? After the initial high of getting an agent, now I have to deal with the lows of editor rejections. I know I can write well, but maybe I can't write quite well enough. Maybe I'm just below that threshold of publishable.

If I went back to work full time, I would be moderately wealthy within a few years and I could spend all my free time playing video games and reading books. So what sort of insane person must I be to not do that?

(OK, that's enough whining. I have a short story to edit, my current WIP's second draft to complete, and another novel's final draft to revise.)

Angelinity
03-26-2007, 09:05 PM
...because you have to write -- must write -- and will write :)

CaroGirl
03-26-2007, 09:08 PM
I dunno. Maybe we're all crazy. But nothing beats the high of success in this business (so I'm told). It'll all be worth it to see your book up there on store shelves.

All the best, and hang in there!!

SpookyWriter
03-26-2007, 09:10 PM
I never felt this emotional rollercoaster as a computer programmer. And I made a helluva lot more money (for that matter, I made a helluva lot more money working the counter at McDonald's.)

So why, exactly, did I decide to be a writer? After the initial high of getting an agent, now I have to deal with the lows of editor rejections. I know I can write well, but maybe I can't write quite well enough. Maybe I'm just below that threshold of publishable.

If I went back to work full time, I would be moderately wealthy within a few years and I could spend all my free time playing video games and reading books. So what sort of insane person must I be to not do that?

(OK, that's enough whining. I have a short story to edit, my current WIP's second draft to complete, and another novel's final draft to revise.)So why don't you go back to programming, save a ton of money, and then at some point in the future write full-time? I am in the same boat as yourself except that I continue to program because the money is so good and I haven't attempted to write full-time yet.

Adam Israel
03-26-2007, 09:20 PM
So why don't you go back to programming, save a ton of money, and then at some point in the future write full-time? I am in the same boat as yourself except that I continue to program because the money is so good and I haven't attempted to write full-time yet.


I'm also in the same position. I work full-time as programmer/CTO/owner of a couple small businesses, enough to pay the bills and live semi-comfortably. Writing is a serious hobby but not one I'm ready to quit my "day job" over for. At least, not until I have a signed contract and advance in hand, and only if said advance were enough to live off of.

Why not do both? Work full-time programming and save away the extra money towards retirement and spend your free time writing.

Kudra
03-26-2007, 09:24 PM
... because they told you that if you always followed your heart, success would follow. And you believed them.

Doug Johnson
03-26-2007, 09:38 PM
King and Grisham didn't quit their day jobs until they signed big buck deals. Waiting didn't hurt their writing careers.

DeadlyAccurate
03-26-2007, 09:54 PM
... because they told you that if you always followed your heart, success would follow. And you believed them.

I did? That's news to me. I always thought I was more pragmatic than that, but I guess not.


So why don't you go back to programming, save a ton of money, and then at some point in the future write full-time? I am in the same boat as yourself except that I continue to program because the money is so good and I haven't attempted to write full-time yet.

I'm already writing full time. My husband makes enough money that I don't have to work at the moment. In fact, he'll be taking off a few months himself, starting in May, because we've been saving up for that. After that, we'll probably both have to go back to work, but in the meantime I'm going to get as much writing done as I can.

I'm not whining about the money. I'm whining because I haven't sold my book. I WANT TO SELL MY BOOK, DAMN IT!

(BTW, did you know that Firefox's spell checker doesn't flag "helluva" as a misspelled word?)

Penguin Queen
03-26-2007, 11:32 PM
Youve got an agent. The agent is in this for the money -- they take you on be cause they believe your book is good enough to sell & earn you - and thus them - some money.

Waiting is horrible & exceedingly frustrating. Work on remembering what this time feels like now, so that you can tell everybody about it once youre published and - relatively - rich and famous. ;)

Affordable time out sounds like a good scheme to me. Good luck.

Maprilynne
03-26-2007, 11:42 PM
Deadly, I can totally sympathize. Yeah, you have an agent--I do too--and yeah you're way happy about that, but *ahem, I'm going to use an adult comparison* it's like having an orgasm; no matter how far you've come, getting almost there doesn't make you feel any better.:)

Still, hang in there. You did get an agent and you do have to look at what that is worth. PM me if you're feeling really down.:)

Maprilynne

David McAfee
03-26-2007, 11:53 PM
it's like having an orgasm; no matter how far you've come, getting almost there doesn't make you feel any better.:)

Maprilynne

Why....whatever do you mean, April? :)

Too bad about the editor rejections, Deadly. Many sympathies. :( Be glad you have an agent, though. That's closer than I am at the moment...

Pisarz
03-27-2007, 12:02 AM
Just think, Deadly, your dejection-worthy situation constitutes other people's goals. (Not that I, in all my eternal agentless glory, am referring to my own pathetic quest for representation or anything . . .)

Hang in there. You've got a great agent who will work very, very hard on your behalf and isn't the type to give up easily . . . so you shouldn't, either. Good luck. :)

DeadlyAccurate
03-27-2007, 12:26 AM
Just think, Deadly, your dejection-worthy situation constitutes other people's goals.

You're right, of course. I truly am grateful for what has happened so far.

Thank you, everyone, for your reassurances and kind words.

johnzakour
03-27-2007, 01:08 AM
Yeah, I too gave up a well paying web guru and dropped out of a Ph.D. program to write.

I told my boss I thought computers were draining my soul. (I tend to be a bit dramatic, but it sure sounded good.)

Why would we quit good jobs to write? One of two reasons:

1) We're not that bright.

2) Sometimes you gotta do what you gotta do.

Actually, I do love the flexibility and freedom of being a writer.

Mom'sWrite
03-27-2007, 03:27 AM
Just keep swimming. Just keep swimming. Just keep swimming.
--Dory

:)

Saundra Julian
03-27-2007, 05:36 AM
No one said a writer had to be sane, did they?

zahra
03-28-2007, 04:54 AM
I'm gonna get a job as a computer programmer.

Then maybe I'd have time to be a writer.

Adam Israel
03-28-2007, 05:13 AM
I'm gonna get a job as a computer programmer.

Then maybe I'd have time to be a writer.

:roll:

Oh how I wish that were the case!

Shadow_Ferret
03-28-2007, 07:09 AM
At least you've got an agent. Some of us haven't even made it that far yet yet.

If you're questioning your raison d'etre over editor rejection, where does that put us who are still at the agent rejection point?

Writer2011
03-28-2007, 07:12 AM
It will all work out in the end...you'll see :)

triceretops
03-28-2007, 07:39 AM
I'm in the same boat, Deadly. Getting the agent was the easy part for me. My book's shopping history is getting depressing, but I'm well on my way with another book, a paranormal thriller that bolts right out of the gate, unlike my previous books. I think if you time it right, you can furnish another book to your agent in the time that the first one makes its rounds. That way you'll always have something out in the market. The trick is to be prolific enough to keep a steady stream going.

I know it is hard, because it seems like there is no incentive to keep going. Gratification is not instant--it's a long haul thing, like a marathon. I hope you or I never lack the breath to finish the run until we hit.

Tri

DeadlyAccurate
03-28-2007, 08:34 PM
I'm all better today. Mostly. Not that anything has changed, but my short story is starting to come together and I'm reading both a fabulous novel and a fascinating non-fiction book, and I know the revisions I'm going to make to my book aren't that big a deal.

So thanks, everyone. I think this hits me about every six months, and I go nuts.

Penguin Queen
03-28-2007, 09:46 PM
<...> Getting the agent was the easy part for me. <...>

Huh.

Dani Dunn
03-28-2007, 10:46 PM
* it's like having an orgasm; no matter how far you've come, getting almost there doesn't make you feel any better.:)

Maprilynne

I swear you really know how to put things into perscpective. Other than trying to get published, not being able to come is the most frustrating thing in the damn world!!!!!!!