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Grey Malkin
03-17-2007, 02:51 PM
Well, that's my plan: less booze, more words.

I've decided to embark on a scientific experiment and give up alcohol for a whole month to see if my writing, or the amount that I write, improves. At the end of the month, if there is a marked difference in health or work output, I might even kick the booze for good.

I've got a blog, keeping track of my efforts at: http://colinmulhern1.blogspot.com/

I'm on day 3 at the moment.

Grey

skelly
03-17-2007, 03:22 PM
Good luck to you with that. Maybe you'll inspire me to do the same. I'm pulling for you, and I've bookmarked your blog.

:)

Mandy-Jane
03-17-2007, 03:32 PM
Interesting concept - no alcohol for a month. Mmm, not sure I could do it, but good luck!

Grey Malkin
03-17-2007, 04:42 PM
I still don't know how those subscribe feed things work on a blog, or how to get other people's blog's to show up automatically if I have subscribed to them - at the moment I have to go back to the actual website.

skelly
03-17-2007, 04:47 PM
I don't know either, other than that you have to have some sort of feed reader thing. I had a Yahoo360 page that I could cut and paste feeds into, but mostly I just bookmark or "favorites" anything that looks interesting and check back whenever it occurs to me to do so. Somebody will probably stop by here and set us both straight on it.

Grey Malkin
03-17-2007, 05:03 PM
found something. Seems to work fine - http://www.feedreader.com/

FergieC
03-17-2007, 05:18 PM
I gave up completely for a whole week in February :)

It does help. Waking up stone cold sober, with not even a hint of hangover is the best way to start a writing day, and I can't write at all after more than a pint - just fall asleep or get lazy.

Trouble is, that first pint can be quite helpful to get you into it after a day at work, but then it kind of gives you the taste and there's the danger of ending up texting someone and going for a few more instead of carrying on...it's a tough life, really.

Jamesaritchie
03-17-2007, 05:22 PM
I have one drink per year, a Jameson and coffee, on St. Patrick's Day. There was a time when I drank a fair amount. Then I discovered there are no benefits to drinking, and many disadvantages.

No one writes well because of booze. At best, they write well despite the booze.

FergieC
03-17-2007, 06:37 PM
Then I discovered there are no benefits to drinking

Oh, I dunno. It's good for getting rid of time you've got spare...erm, actually, that's not a good thing at all, is it?

No, I agree. There is no benefit for writing at all. It is a social benefit though, and I wouldn't like to give up totally.

moondance
03-18-2007, 09:26 PM
Go, Colin!! Have bookmarked your blog so will keep an eye on your progress - good for you!

Robin Bayne
03-19-2007, 02:21 AM
Go, Colin!! Have bookmarked your blog so will keep an eye on your progress - good for you!


Me too. :)

Little Red Barn
03-19-2007, 03:41 AM
Good Luck Colin! :)

RumpleTumbler
03-19-2007, 06:25 AM
My thyroid quit working and I gained like 50lbs. This caused me to have high blood pressure. Don't eat so much salt the doctors said. I quit salt for a month. No change at all. Don't smoke the doctors said. I quit smoking the first week of January. No change at all. I've cut down on my alcohol consumption and guess what? That's right! I'm getting bored with drinking I think. You can only abuse something for so long. Anyway, I hope it helps you. It will be interesting to see.

Grey Malkin
03-19-2007, 01:14 PM
Hey thanks all, but I've got to post a quick message to Moondance - just as I read that post the front doorbell rang. Postman, with a parcel. Your book!

How weird is that. I didn't even order it. (okay, that lat bit was a fib).

Big "sorry" to Iain Banks if you're reading this, but The Crow Road will have to wait until I've read Jo's book.

:)

Grey (Colin M - whatever) :tongue

Grey Malkin
03-19-2007, 07:09 PM
Update: I've taken that blog down. I've got a manuscript in submission at the moment, so a blog about trying to go a month without booze can look like a blog about a problem with booze. I'm keeping with the experiment though.

Mr. Jinx
03-19-2007, 10:11 PM
Hey, blog or no blog, good luck with the experiment.

I have had almost nothing (except for one or two light beers) since last July or so. I wansnt anti alchohol or anything, I decided to get back to a healthy body weight and when I started to be careful with calories I was stunned at how many callories a few beers or drinks would come to. With no exercise other than occasional yardwork I went from 230 lbs last July to 186 lbs (as of this morning).

Just feeling better every day has helped my writing. Again, good luck with the experiment!

Maprilynne
03-20-2007, 12:28 AM
Well, I don't drink, never have (been to a lot of drunken parties. I tell you what, watching other people get drunk has got to be more fun than getting drunk yourself.) But I put booze in my book! Does that count?:)

Maprilynne

RJLeahy
03-20-2007, 02:09 AM
I only drink to make other people more interesting. :)

moondance
03-20-2007, 11:11 AM
Colin, your blog seems to have disappeared this morning! What's happened?!

Grey Malkin
03-20-2007, 02:38 PM
I wansnt anti alchohol or anything, I decided to get back to a healthy body weight

That's kind of what I'm aiming for.

Grey Malkin
03-20-2007, 02:39 PM
Colin, your blog seems to have disappeared this morning! What's happened?!

I took it down - there's a note on this thread (about four or five posts back) explaining why.

Halfway through your book, BTW. :)

Jamesaritchie
03-21-2007, 04:07 AM
Update: I've taken that blog down. I've got a manuscript in submission at the moment, so a blog about trying to go a month without booze can look like a blog about a problem with booze. I'm keeping with the experiment though.

If you can't easily go a month without booze, you almost certainly do have a serious problem with it. Not being able to do exactly this without any trouble at all is one of the leading signs of a problem drinker.

RumpleTumbler
03-21-2007, 04:09 AM
If you can't easily go a month without booze, you almost certainly do have a serious problem with it. Not being able to do exactly this without any trouble at all is one of the leading signs of a problem drinker.

A month without booze? Surely you jest!

moondance
03-21-2007, 02:52 PM
D'oh! And I tell other people off for not reading threads properly before posting!

Hope you are liking my book ;) 'enjoying' never seems like quite the right word...!

Grey Malkin
03-21-2007, 09:17 PM
Hope you are liking my book ;) 'enjoying' never seems like quite the right word...!

It's certainly uncomforatble in places, but to invoke emotion in the reader is what we should be aiming for, and certainly what you have achieved with what I've read so far (I'm almost finished). It's very, very good. Totally character driven and very real. The strongest aspect for me is what is not said. One of the most rewarding parts of reading is being able to see what is happening, to put the pieces of the puzzle together, rather than being told. For anyone wanting a masterclass in how to write good teen anxiety/issue stuff, they would do well to read this.

Grey Malkin
03-21-2007, 09:39 PM
If you can't easily go a month without booze, you almost certainly do have a serious problem with it. Not being able to do exactly this without any trouble at all is one of the leading signs of a problem drinker.

This was one of my reasons for doing this. In the UK, having a drink as a social thing is really rammed down your throat. Almost ever soap opera is based around the local pub - people seem to be in there from eight in the morning till the early hours of the next day. In sitcoms people drink cans in front of the TV, or wine at the kitchen table. It's only when you take a step back that you start to wonder if we are being tuned into alchohol. When you consider the amount of tax on the stuff it becomes very easy to stray into conspiracy territory.

I think there is definitely a fine line between social trends and social problems and I honestly think if you redefine the term "alcoholic" and move away from the current idea of it being someone gets wasted at every opportunity and instead look at how many people would find it difficult to cut out of their lives, then over here, you would have a lot of people fitting your label of "problem drinkers". The trouble with that, of course, is the term "problem drinker" suggests social problems, such as domestic violence or mental illness, rather than just a psychological dependency.

moondance
03-23-2007, 01:36 PM
It's certainly uncomforatble in places, but to invoke emotion in the reader is what we should be aiming for, and certainly what you have achieved with what I've read so far (I'm almost finished). It's very, very good. Totally character driven and very real. The strongest aspect for me is what is not said. One of the most rewarding parts of reading is being able to see what is happening, to put the pieces of the puzzle together, rather than being told. For anyone wanting a masterclass in how to write good teen anxiety/issue stuff, they would do well to read this.

*blushes like mad*

thank you!