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Guy DaBored
03-07-2007, 06:03 AM
I had a decent slacker job, but the company started to turn into a real business. During the four years I worked there I listened to hundreds of audio books and even had a little time to write. I decided to get a real job. It pays well, but I canít take it. I need time to think and read and write. If I donít get into grad school, Iím going to have to find a job that doesnít make me want to hurl myself off the roof. I need a sweet slacker job.

Night Auditor at a hotel Ė Slacker paradise, but I canít do 3rd shift.

Security Guard Ė good if thereís not too much patrolling involved, or standing in public staring into the distance.

Most really good slacker jobs seem to be sporadic and found by luck. Still, Iíd like to get some ideas. Have any of you had slacker jobs good for reading and writing? Not a writing related job, but a job with lots of free time. Pay is of little concern.

Thanks.

Tallymark
03-07-2007, 07:21 AM
Best job I ever had was as a tutor at my university. The university itself set up the tutoring program, and allocated a whole floor of the library for tutors to be available in all day long. So, you'd sign up to tutor for certain hours, and then you'd go there, pick out a table, and wait for a student who needed you. And while waiting, you could do whatever the hell you wanted--even go online. Math tutors got a lot of traffic, but other courses? I could go a week getting paid to just sit there without tutoring a single student. It was fantastic. Unfortunately, it's probably not the kind of job you can get if you're not currently a student, or perhaps if you were a prior student there, but still, if anyone ever gets an opportunity for a job like that, take it. Most amazing slacker job EVER.

Don't know what would be a good slacker job that's more widley available, though...cashiering can be good sometimes, but it's a bit hit or miss. I work in a Barnes & Noble, and if I'm at the front registers, there's a pretty steady stream of people once things get going. But if I'm at the back, then on a quiet day, I can go twenty minutes at a time without having to do anything. Alas, I don't control where I get placed. XD

janetbellinger
03-07-2007, 07:28 AM
How about a belly button delinter or sweater defuzzer? Sorry, just kidding.

Toothpaste
03-07-2007, 08:12 AM
I really liked temping because most often you were stuck in front of a computer all day long with not much to do. Great incentive to write, and not too horrible pay. Also you don't need to worry about office politics or making friends. It was in fact because I was temping and had all that free time that I wrote my novel. So I would highly recommend it.

weatherfield
03-07-2007, 08:24 AM
My biggest slacker job was probably Weekday Fitting-Room Girl at a second-rate department store. Sometimes it would get kind of hectic, but mostly the clientele consisted of a few retirees and the occasional mother-with-toddler. I counted items and handed out tags with numbers on them. When people brought the clothes back out, I counted them again and put them on racks. It was kind of like that movie, Shopgirl, only far less glamorous. And without Steve Martin.

I had a fair amount of time to write. I would carry around a little notepad and a pen. It was nice, because most of the people who have those kinds of jobs don't care too much about them, so no one ever bothered me about it. Not very much was expected of me. If I got bored, sometimes I would organize shelves in the general vicinity of the fitting-rooms. For me, organizing things is very conducive to thinking. Mornings were best. Hardly anyone came in at all in the mornings. The pay was pretty bad, though. I know you said that wasn't an issue, but let me modify what I just said. The pay was terrible.

FergieC
03-07-2007, 01:47 PM
Night time security work is excellent. 12 straight hours of reading, writing and you have to keep alert and aware (the once hourly patrol is good for that). I wrote a fair chunk of my last novel on a building site, sitting in half finished luxury apartments, surrounded by coffee and sweets from the 7-11 over the road. One of the buildings was terrifying though - had to patrol the semi-finished underground parkade which went down about 6 floors and was seriously eerie. If you're writing a horror novel, that would be great...

Librarianship can be a bit of a doddle too at times.

alleycat
03-07-2007, 03:01 PM
May I suggest your local state government, preferably in one of those obscure departments that no one even knows exists.

badducky
03-07-2007, 03:12 PM
i disliked temping immensely, but i always ended up doing light warehouse on account of my big, ugly maleness.

i never got into the security game because i never really lived in the kind of places where that gig is safe.

i also didn't much care for the bookstore thing when they told me if they caught me reading whilst waiting for a customer one more time, they'd fire me... imagine, working at a bookstore on a slow day and not being allowed to read the books!

Hm, cafes were fine, as long as one avoids Starbucks. All that canned cheerfulness in one place is not good for your writer angst.

I think the best slacker jobs require a bit of work in the beginning. You see, people with very specialized, but valuable skills only have to work a little bit to get paid lots of money. So, go to school, get that specialized certification and huddle in your cubicle with this position that's hard to replace on account of all the hoops involved.

Leva
03-07-2007, 03:35 PM
Inbound call center work. And the pay's often decent, with good benefits. I actually wrote a novel on a PDA between calls. Sometimes you can also get graveyard positions, which are quite often VERY slow.

Just depends on what you were taking calls FOR. Certain types of call centers are better than others.

Note: your tolerance for both abuse from customers and for office politics/managerial nonsense has to be very, very high. Think Dilbert.

FergieC
03-07-2007, 03:45 PM
Inbound call center work. And the pay's often decent, with good benefits. I actually wrote a novel on a PDA between calls.

Oh God, no. I worked in a call centre for a major taxi company for about 2 weeks and it was hell. I didn't have a moment to breath between calls, never mind write. We were based in Edinburgh, booking taxis for people in London too which didn't help - little old ladies would call up who'd get the same taxi driver every week, taking them to the same hairdressers and they could never understand that the person taking the call coudn't do anything with the hairdressers in Ilford, love, the one I go to every week...it's just round the corner from Sainbury's. Utterly frustrating for both parties.

Although not as bad as the rushed business customers who were frequently told Euston station didn't exist because the person taking the call was typing in Houston, and a million more daft things like that.

Utter, unmittigated, hell
:Headbang:

britwrit
03-07-2007, 04:15 PM
If you're young and want free time to write, I imagine you can pick a 20-hour shift somewhere. You can do that in the UK and make enough to live on, plus there's alway overtime if you need a little extra that week.

Shadow_Ferret
03-07-2007, 06:38 PM
I wonder if the city has an openings for a bridge tender?

MidnightMuse
03-07-2007, 07:18 PM
May I suggest your local state government, preferably in one of those obscure departments that no one even knows exists.

SSSShhhhhh!!!

Geez . . .word gets out, and people will talk !

Christine N.
03-07-2007, 07:23 PM
Substitute teacher. Middle school, NOT elementary. I have five classes a day most days, all the same lesson over and over. Usually busy work. Then I have at least a lunch and a planning period (unless they need me to cover during that period, but doesn't happen that often) to myself. 84 minutes all for me. Plus many assignments have two planning period, or a duty period - hall or lav monitor is another 42 minutes to read or write.

Check around to the districts, the pay will vary. Advantage - if you don't want to work a day - you're unavailable.

It's kind of hit or miss though - not every day, and then sometimes many days. If you do more than one district you'll work more, obviously, but you can pick a day off if you want. No weekends, no holidays, and summers off, but you may want to find something for those three dry months. Also none of the 'extra' crap teachers have to deal with - no parents, no grading, no lesson plans.

Actually I know quite a few writers who are subs. Must be something to it.

just_a_girl
03-07-2007, 09:37 PM
When I was a college student, I had all manner of slacker jobs: writing tutor, research assistant, teaching assistant. Then when I graduated, I kept working at the university as an administrative assistant, which also was a big slacker job. I suggest trying to find office work at your local university. Things should be pretty slow. I stopped working there b/c although there wasn't a lot of work, I got very involved in gossip and socializing w/the other staff members, which led to trouble. Now I'm a desperate housewife.

Leva
03-07-2007, 09:54 PM
If you're young and want free time to write, I imagine you can pick a 20-hour shift somewhere. You can do that in the UK and make enough to live on, plus there's alway overtime if you need a little extra that week.

This is something that a lot of folks in other companies don't realize about the US -- it's not possible to live on a part time job here in most communities. It's not even possible to have a decent standard of living with one full time average job (40 hours/week). It takes at least two people working average full time jobs, plus likely some overtime (which pays 1 1/2 times your regular pay) or maybe a side job to afford an okay one bedroom apartment. That's not a "nice" apartment -- that's an "okay" one -- the sort that isn't a crack house.

Most single people here in the US work either two jobs, one job with overtime, have help from their parents, live with their parents, or have multiple roommates and rent a house. Or they live in really crappy housing -- the sort where your roommates have six legs and you don't have to get out of bed to fix breakfast because you can reach the stove from the bed.

We also get less vacation -- average in the US is less than two weeks. I had one job where I had five days of time off allowed per year, including sick leave. If you used your time off because you were sick, you were allowed no vacation.

I own my own house and I have a decent job. However, after "buying" the house (with mortgage), in order to make ends meet, I had to work 70-80 hours a week for five years, sell stuff at a swap meet on weekends (live chickens, used books, etc.) for a small profit, buy no new clothes unless they were on sale, (Goodwill was my mall), and eat ramen noodles by the case. When a major appliance would break, I would buy a used replacement.

When I got pneumonia, even WITH insurance, my copays for doctor visits, x-rays, medication, etc., exceeded my mortgage for that month.

My house? Cost HALF the average for this state. It's a small mobile home on land fifteen miles from the nearest town. (Buying it also proved to be smart; I have friends who are trying to find a decent apartment right now and studio apartments now cost more than my mortgage per month.)

And my job is not a bad one at all -- I was making three times minimum wage per hour when I bought my house, and more, now.

(I do not know how people making minimum wage survive!)


Just thought I'd throw this out as a perspective from the other side of the pond ... :-)

PeeDee
03-07-2007, 09:58 PM
I work in a used bookstore, and it's not really a slacker job, but it's pounds of fun.

I've never had a 'slacker,' job, though I've wanted one on occasion. Even when I have jobs that I could get away with slacking in, I still work as hard as I can. I have too much work ethic to just schlep off.

(that said, I've always wanted one of those jobs where I can read, and write, and stuff on the clock. I do both at the bookstore, when I'm not otherwise busy having a work ethic. And I drink a silly amount of tea.)

Judg
03-07-2007, 11:02 PM
My son is working the night shift for a security company. Not patrolling hallways, but manning their control centre. He has to be available when an alarm goes off in a business they service, to decide whether to phone the police, the fire department, the owner... Not much happens. He just has to be there. The absolute perfect job for reading and writing because it is his presence and availability that is required. He isn't expected to be doing anything most of the time. Of course, there is the nasty little inconvenience of being up all night. The day shifts are nowhere near as tranquil.

Tallymark
03-08-2007, 02:19 AM
This is something that a lot of folks in other companies don't realize about the US -- it's not possible to live on a part time job here in most communities. It's not even possible to have a decent standard of living with one full time average job (40 hours/week).


This is absolutely true. I work two part-time jobs right now, and the only way I can manage it is by living with my mom. And even then, I'm only just holding my ground--my bills and my earnings just about break even. A friend of mine is splitting an apartment with someone, and he's got three part-time jobs and is looking for another one. In the US, you generally just can't live on that kind of money. It's why so many fresh college graduates find themselves moving back into their parents houses--it's nigh impossible to get a foothold in the real world with the kind of wages you start out with.

Also, one of the delightful things about working part-time jobs is even if you're working more than 40 hours a week, you're not working that much per job, so no benefits for you!

janetbellinger
03-08-2007, 02:53 AM
I do that too.

PeeDee
03-08-2007, 03:44 AM
This is absolutely true. I work two part-time jobs right now, and the only way I can manage it is by living with my mom. And even then, I'm only just holding my ground--my bills and my earnings just about break even. A friend of mine is splitting an apartment with someone, and he's got three part-time jobs and is looking for another one. In the US, you generally just can't live on that kind of money. It's why so many fresh college graduates find themselves moving back into their parents houses--it's nigh impossible to get a foothold in the real world with the kind of wages you start out with.

Also, one of the delightful things about working part-time jobs is even if you're working more than 40 hours a week, you're not working that much per job, so no benefits for you!

Quoted for truthness. It's why I tell kids to A) Stay in damn college! and B) Don't expect a wheelbarrow of money when you get out of college.

I know a girl who has her Masters in Cultural Anthropology. I know her because we both worked at a Wal-Mart. She ws confused and perplexed when she started, because she'd put in a lot of years at school to wind up lugging boxes at Wal-Mart. I felt bad for her. There is truth in the adage "A college degree and a dollar will get you a cup of coffee."

The first thing my wife and I did when we were married was to backslide uncontrollably into debt, debt, debt. We weren't blowing money everywhere, we don't live wild lives (I mostly sit at home and write, when I have the time) and yet, there are more bills than money. And god forbid you should have to go to the doctor. (I'm still paying for one measley visit to get Pluresey, however it's spelled, treated almost five months ago. It's starting to reappear, and I have no idew what I'll do about it.)

So the long point of it is, get a job, get a job you can stand...but make sure you get a job that nets some money, because even if you don't need it now, you're going to need it eventually. And if the money isn't there, the bill still is. Make sure you're ready to meet it. Otherwise, your writing time will vanish faster than if you hadn't gotten a slacker job in the first place.

hnh
03-08-2007, 03:55 AM
I used to work in the word processing department of a law firm, preparing court pleadings and correspondence. It sounds intense but after I knew what I was doing it was easy. On slow days, I'd have hours and hours to write. And since my job was word processing, no one thought it was unusual that I typed a lot and printed hundreds of pages and mailed large documents.

Bubastes
03-08-2007, 03:58 AM
So the long point of it is, get a job, get a job you can stand...but make sure you get a job that nets some money, because even if you don't need it now, you're going to need it eventually. And if the money isn't there, the bill still is.

Which is why (and it pains me to say this) my parents were probably right when they told me "Forget about studying what you love in college. Go for the money. You can always do what you love on the side."

Yeah, I know that's not a popular viewpoint, and yes it does cost something in terms of inner happiness (I guess). But it's much easier to write what you want if you're not worrying about whether you can pay the light bill, even if getting there requires working more hours than you want or doing a job that falls short of your ideal. If you're going to work tons of hours anyway, you might as well make it pay.

PeeDee
03-08-2007, 04:01 AM
Which is why (and it pains me to say this) my parents were probably right when they told me "Forget about studying what you love in college. Go for the money. You can always do what you love on the side."
Yeah, I know that's not a popular viewpoint, and yes it does cost something in terms of inner happiness (I guess). But it's much easier to write what you want if you're not worrying about whether you can pay the light bill, even if getting there requires working more hours than you want or doing a job that falls short of your ideal. If you're going to work tons of hours anyway, you might as well make it pay.

Oddly enough, my parents never told me this. They told me to study what I enjoy. Darn you, O Supportive Parents! Gah!

But I agree with the viewpoint, unpopular though it may be. If you go to college for a useful skill and get a high-paying job, then you have money to fall back on (which can eliminate a lot of financial stress that clogs up those writing bits in your head) and you may wind up doing something fun...and what the hell, you'll be able to take time off and vacations withoutgoing bankrupt, and then you can get your writing done.

And even if you don't, you're going to be working a crapload of jobs anyway to make ends meet and your writing is STILL going to be shunted to a few hours here and there, so why not get paid for your lost time?

Bubastes
03-08-2007, 04:06 AM
And even if you don't, you're going to be working a crapload of jobs anyway to make ends meet and your writing is STILL going to be shunted to a few hours here and there, so why not get paid for your lost time?

Yep yep yep. It didn't take much encouragement from my parents, though. They know that I really like and appreciate money (I know, people say "who doesn't?" but then their choices seem to reflect otherwise) and am willing to put up with a lot to get it, invest it, and ultimately use it for other life goals. Money's the most versatile tool on the planet, IMO.

PeeDee
03-08-2007, 04:27 AM
Yep yep yep. It didn't take much encouragement from my parents, though. They know that I really like and appreciate money (I know, people say "who doesn't?" but then their choices seem to reflect otherwise) and am willing to put up with a lot to get it, invest it, and ultimately use it for other life goals. Money's the most versatile tool on the planet, IMO.

*cough* Course....I mean....I wish someone had whacked younger me and actually told me this stuff, but.... :)

Bubastes
03-08-2007, 04:45 AM
*cough* Course....I mean....I wish someone had whacked younger me and actually told me this stuff, but.... :)

I wish someone would have told me to go to more parties in college because it's easier to recover when you're in your 20's than when you're older, but ah well!

WerenCole
03-08-2007, 05:58 AM
Professional beer taster

a tree of night
03-08-2007, 06:54 AM
Professional beer taster

Michael Jackson made a nice career of that one. And switched to single malts for variety.

Sheryl Nantus
03-08-2007, 07:11 AM
Night time security work is excellent. 12 straight hours of reading, writing and you have to keep alert and aware (the once hourly patrol is good for that). I wrote a fair chunk of my last novel on a building site, sitting in half finished luxury apartments, surrounded by coffee and sweets from the 7-11 over the road. One of the buildings was terrifying though - had to patrol the semi-finished underground parkade which went down about 6 floors and was seriously eerie. If you're writing a horror novel, that would be great...

amen to that one - 15 years and I had a great time "working" the night shift...

worse night was when I had just viewed an "Alien" marathon and then had to patrol an empty factory full of machinery with minimal lighting.

it was a LOOOOOOOOOOOOONG shift.

Akuma
03-08-2007, 07:37 AM
amen to that one - 15 years and I had a great time "working" the night shift...

worse night was when I had just viewed an "Alien" marathon and then had to patrol an empty factory full of machinery with minimal lighting.

it was a LOOOOOOOOOOOOONG shift.

How do you go about applying for a job in security?
I mean, do you need past experience in ass-kicking-if-need-be or do you just need to look intimidating in general?

Sheryl Nantus
03-08-2007, 07:40 AM
How do you go about applying for a job in security?
I mean, do you need past experience in ass-kicking-if-need-be or do you just need to look intimidating in general?

can you stay awake?

can you *pretend* to stay awake?

the job is yours.

:tongue

seriously, it depends on the job - I worked consulates, hospitals and industrial complexes for 15 years and survived nicely without having to put a hand on anyone.

and I look about as intimidating as your average 250 lbs 5'4" Canadian redhead can look.

(that would be *not*...)

:D

Dave.C.Robinson
03-09-2007, 01:24 AM
I found inbound call center work pretty good for reading and writing. The trick is to get the right center and work something like third shift.

a tree of night
03-09-2007, 01:52 AM
How do you go about applying for a job in security?
I mean, do you need past experience in ass-kicking-if-need-be or do you just need to look intimidating in general?

Security means different things in different places. In an industrial setting, it's often more related to monitoring equipment for overheating, leaks, etc. than anything else. Depending on the shift, you may be letting contractors in and out and working gates for deliveries. Reliability is the main attribute they're looking for. Security clearance may be helpful depending on the nature of the work being done (not necessarily the work you do) at the plant.

miztori
03-09-2007, 01:56 AM
I had a decent slacker job, but the company started to turn into a real business. During the four years I worked there I listened to hundreds of audio books and even had a little time to write. I decided to get a real job. It pays well, but I canít take it. I need time to think and read and write. If I donít get into grad school, Iím going to have to find a job that doesnít make me want to hurl myself off the roof. I need a sweet slacker job.

Night Auditor at a hotel Ė Slacker paradise, but I canít do 3rd shift.

Security Guard Ė good if thereís not too much patrolling involved, or standing in public staring into the distance.

Most really good slacker jobs seem to be sporadic and found by luck. Still, Iíd like to get some ideas. Have any of you had slacker jobs good for reading and writing? Not a writing related job, but a job with lots of free time. Pay is of little concern.

Thanks.


Find a job working in a mattress store! No lie. My store is off the beaten path, so when there is no customers, I write read, eat sandwiches & product test (usually everyday at around 2pm) plus I get hourly and commission.
People come in wanting a a bed-since thats all we sell it weeds out anyone else.two days a week I work 12 hour days. I have had days without customers-and I still get paid :)

Guy DaBored
03-09-2007, 05:19 AM
The mattress sales job is a riot, like a slacker job out of a movie.

I once had an inbound call job that was amazing. It lasted 2 weeks because most of us got 0-1 calls a night. I got lots of homework done. I moved to outbound and lasted about five minutes.

I turn braindead from 3rd shift, unfortunately. If Iím going to be braindead, I might as well work the job I have that pays really well. I used to work 2nd shift security during college and got quite a bit of homework done that way, but 2nd shift and Iíd never see my wife.

I really like the substitute teaching idea. If I donít get into grad school, I think thatís what Iíll try. Either that or part time personal training, since I love lifting and wouldnít have to get the typically shitty part time hourly rate.

I invested in my wifeís career by working 60-70 hour weeks for 2 years at a cushy job (but still, 70 hrs a week) and then 1 year working at my current real job to support her through school and pay off the debt. Sheís more than willing to help me through grad school or in a year-long interim between applications. Sheís also now set to make fat stacks. That's how I have financial leeway. I invested wisely.


If a person is of average or lower intelligence, they need to get a skill. My degree is in English Lit, and within one month of attempting to get a real job, I did. In fact, I tried to get an entry level job at an insurance company, took a logic test, wrote a sample letter, they looked at that and my resume and the very first thing they said in the interview was, ďYouíre overqualified.Ē Almost every question that followed was about whether or not I would be too bored. This was with my English degree and a past of being a Nation Merit Scholar. The next week I got a higher-than-entry-level job doing procurement (as businessy as business gets) for major projects for one of the largest power industry engineering companies in the world. Huge potential for advancement if I want it, and since I deal with business people, I come off looking like a genius in my emails. This is the same job I could have gotten if Iíd had a business degree. In fact, my boss wanted someone who could write and think out of the box, so my English degree and the fact that my resume includes that I write as a hobby helped me get the job. The new procurement guy hired for invoicing has a history degree. Heís also really really smart.

If you are smart and you studied generic business, you missed out, because you could have studied your interest and gotten the same job. I have no fear about not being able to make money when I choose to.

jennifer75
03-09-2007, 05:24 AM
I had a decent slacker job, but the company started to turn into a real business. During the four years I worked there I listened to hundreds of audio books and even had a little time to write. I decided to get a real job. It pays well, but I can’t take it. I need time to think and read and write. If I don’t get into grad school, I’m going to have to find a job that doesn’t make me want to hurl myself off the roof. I need a sweet slacker job.

Night Auditor at a hotel – Slacker paradise, but I can’t do 3rd shift.


Security Guard – good if there’s not too much patrolling involved, or standing in public staring into the distance.

Most really good slacker jobs seem to be sporadic and found by luck. Still, I’d like to get some ideas. Have any of you had slacker jobs good for reading and writing? Not a writing related job, but a job with lots of free time. Pay is of little concern.

Thanks.

I'm a receptionist for a ..... (oooops have I said too much already?) I'm pretty much responsible only for the phones and mail. So, yea, I write alot, though I can't actually read a book at work I do research books online. I post a LOT between two different forums and I play internet pool.

I do a lot of non-work related fun stuff. You'll see my posts here on AW are all between the hours of 9:00 am and 6:00 pm.

OH, they pay me $45K to do this. Gotta love it.

MattW
03-09-2007, 05:44 AM
Being the primary bread-winner in my family is tough. We're newlyweds just starting out with a moderate amount of debt, and no savings for a house. My wife is already trying to discover what her second career should be (at 27!), so my job needs to be stable.

My inner slacker is dying to break free...

travelgal
03-09-2007, 05:10 PM
Teach in Korea.

If you're a qualified teacher, you can get a public school job. It's not like teaching at home...with all the admin crap you have to do, and few kids are troublesome. Depending on the district, you'll get anywhere between two weeks to two months of vacation.

If you're not a qualified teacher but have a degree, you can start at a private institute. (hogwon) You don't bring work home, you teach 30 hours per week and will only need an hour or two per week for preparation. Vacation; two weeks. Do your homework, though.

If you have a Masters or lived a year or two in Korea, you can get a college or uni job. Sometimes you don't even need a Masters. I don't have one. Some unis and colleges advertise one week before semester starts, and are desperate for anybody with a smidegon of teaching experience or experience in Korea. Or just with a pulse, a white face and a degree, although that's rare. If you're lucky, you'll get two months of vacation. If you're blessed, you'll get four plus months of vacation. Not only that, if you're organised and have some degree of common sense, teaching ESL doesn't take too much of your time; all you need to do is plan your lessons, teach, monitor attendance, give the occasional assignment (semesters are only 15 weeks, then minus two weeks for exams, and other days for festivals, sports, excusions, etc.),see the occasional student, write and give exams, and grade. No admin crap, no reports, no parents, few meetings, no publishing requirements. Pay tends to be lower, though.

But, unless you're a spendthrift who spends all his time boozing and whoring, you'll save a whole lotta dough in a short time, and you'll be able to go on vacation to Thailand.

Most of all, you're in a different culture where ideas can start a-brewin'.

PeeDee
03-09-2007, 07:14 PM
Play a guitar on a street corner.

You can't get any better than that. Especially if you dont' each much!

(I'm not convinced that being able to PLAY the guitar is a requirement, either.)

WerenCole
03-09-2007, 10:12 PM
Play a guitar on a street corner.




Hell. . . that is how the Violent Femmes got started. They were playing on a corner in Milwaukee outside a Pretenders concert when one of the Pretenders (though for real) came by and liked them. Whaddya know. . . . presto! They open for the Pretenders and the music world has been a better place ever since.

If only Gnarls Barkely would stop covering their songs. . .

PeeDee
03-09-2007, 10:42 PM
Hell. . . that is how the Violent Femmes got started. They were playing on a corner in Milwaukee outside a Pretenders concert when one of the Pretenders (though for real) came by and liked them. Whaddya know. . . . presto! They open for the Pretenders and the music world has been a better place ever since.

If only Gnarls Barkely would stop covering their songs. . .

I'm going to call my band Gnarry Byrd, or Gnichael Jordan, or something equally catchy.

*muttergrumble*

I didn't know that about the Violent Femmes, but I'm glad we have them in the world.

lfraser
03-10-2007, 10:17 AM
I can't say I recommend the business I'm in, which is condominium and investment property management. In the last few years I've logged up to 100 14-hour days a year (the rest being 'regular' eight to ten hour days). And I was adding 30 hours of writing to that. Not a slacker job. No indeedy. I had to quit before I brained someone, or told a client how I really felt. :D

Hi, Travelgal. I haven't forgotten about you. I'm just settling in to the new job, which finally came through after all.

Vincent
03-10-2007, 10:29 AM
I always thought the ideal job for me would be one where I could just stand beside a conveyor belt and push a button continuously or something like that. Absolutely no effort involved. Then I worked for a few months at a job like that, and it was hell on Earth.

PeeDee
03-10-2007, 10:30 AM
We all dream of the ideal job, of course.

http://www.gothamist.com/images/milton_looks.jpg

TsukiRyoko
03-11-2007, 02:51 AM
I'm going to call my band Gnarry Byrd, or Gnichael Jordan, or something equally catchy.

*muttergrumble*

I didn't know that about the Violent Femmes, but I'm glad we have them in the world.
Cagnarry Byrd. Ahahahaha

Cat Scratch
03-12-2007, 02:31 PM
Careful in your job search--I've ended up with a series of jobs where there was a LOT of free time, yet the managers wanted me to constantly be busy (or at least look it) because they were paying me. This led to hours mindlessly feather-dusting already-clean items in a store, or rearranging papers in a stack at a reception desk for days on end while the phone didn't ring. Once I had to sit at a gift card table with nothing but a few promotional Beanie Babies to keep me company. I only made a sale roughly once every hour, but the managers were loathe to let me do anything but sit and smile. I coped by rearranging the Beanie Babies in order to reinact scenes from famous plays. Management did not find this amusing.

Creativity is not always appreciated. Particularly at bottom-of-the-barrel jobs.

PeeDee
03-12-2007, 05:21 PM
Although it's fascinating to watch the people at the bottom of the barrel, particularly those who have any form of power over you.They will strut their stuff like nothing else...and it's sad, because at the end of the day, the whole world's mostly above them.

Also, sometimes, they're insane. I worked in a gas station for a little while and the folk who worked there were slightly less stable than the folks who stopped in. And we had a silly "keep busy! always!" rule too, even though there's nothing you can do when no one buys anything. Am I going to alphabetize Mountain Dew cans?

Cat Scratch
03-12-2007, 11:04 PM
Ah yes, the lower-managers always go on the worst power trips.

spike
03-12-2007, 11:25 PM
I have a job for you!

Web filtering administrator for a school district. The woman who does it here just surfs the web all day and makes sure the filters are keeping the kids from bad stuff on the web, but letting them see the good stuff.

She also gets to check to see which sites the staff members visit.

So, just get your masters in library science and your computer certifications, and you'll be all set!

BiggerBoat
03-13-2007, 07:33 AM
The most reading and writing I've got done in my lifetime was during the nine years I spent working as a correction officer at a county jail. Once I had seniority I typically opted for the graveyard shift, which gave me plenty of free time when I was assigned to work a unit.

But it was slacking interspersed with occasional suicides, having piss thrown at you, rushing headlong into masses of inmates to break up fights, and just generally dealing with the dregs of society...

... so I wouldn't really recommend it.

I did work a couple of security jobs when I was a young guy, and I'd agree if you get the right spot it has good potential for getting some writing done.