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CheshireCat
02-24-2007, 06:26 AM
Except for progress reports, nobody talks very much over here, do they?

Interesting, especially since I keep hearing how so many writers are doing some version of suspense/mystery/thriller work these days.

Mae
02-24-2007, 06:32 AM
that's because we are all thrilled to be a mystery.... suspenseful isn't it?

kidding cc... so what would you like to cover/chat about?

Linda Adams
02-24-2007, 04:16 PM
It's that way on every message board I've ever been on. Fantasy and science fiction get a lot of discussion, but not thriller ..

Mae
02-24-2007, 06:32 PM
Perhaps this is due to the fact that many fiction genres have a thrilling and suspenseful mystery woven into them....

there will be a live chat time on march 1/2 (depending on where you live) - check it out, suggest some topics if you have any... see you then!

http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=55854

Will Lavender
02-24-2007, 08:12 PM
It might be because thriller writers are not the types of people who often grace message boards.

That's a bit pigeonholey, but there might be something to it.

The thriller writers I've met in real life are...working class folks. At a conference I went to, among the thriller group were former military men, a cop, a former journalist, and two attorneys.

Of course, I don't think message boards can be looked at in terms of the "type" of people who post on them. All types of people post here, I'm sure. But there's a lot happening in the science fiction/fantasy genre on the web, so you would expect a lot more of those writers to be naturally drawn to places such as this. The Greg Iles/common man thriller or the Harry Bosch/haunted PI novels are huge in this genre, and the folks who write those are usually more...what?...empirical.

Let me know if I just confused the hell out of you.

CheshireCat
02-25-2007, 02:31 AM
It might be because thriller writers are not the types of people who often grace message boards.

That's a bit pigeonholey, but there might be something to it.

The thriller writers I've met in real life are...working class folks. At a conference I went to, among the thriller group were former military men, a cop, a former journalist, and two attorneys.

Of course, I don't think message boards can be looked at in terms of the "type" of people who post on them. All types of people post here, I'm sure. But there's a lot happening in the science fiction/fantasy genre on the web, so you would expect a lot more of those writers to be naturally drawn to places such as this. The Greg Iles/common man thriller or the Harry Bosch/haunted PI novels are huge in this genre, and the folks who write those are usually more...what?...empirical.

Let me know if I just confused the hell out of you.

:flag:

Um ... say what?

CheshireCat
02-25-2007, 02:36 AM
that's because we are all thrilled to be a mystery.... suspenseful isn't it?

kidding cc... so what would you like to cover/chat about?


Oh, nothing in particular. I just noticed that not much seemed to be happening in this forum and it struck me as odd. According to my agent, everybody and his brother is writing, trying to write, or wants to write a thriller.

For the record, I write what the publisher calls thrillers. Of course, I also write other stuff. And now that I think about it, I don't know that any specific thriller-related topics are springing to mind.

Huh.

*wandering away*

limitedtimeauthor
02-27-2007, 08:40 PM
I would post more, but I often don't know what to ask.

I guess, "how do you ask a government agency for advice on your plot." Ha ha. But I know the answer to that one. First, you dig up what you can without asking them. Then you ask them whatever's left over.

On the other hand, if that's wrong, someone feel free to start a new thread with tips on this. Or maybe I will.

Because I guess another thing that is bugging me is that if you've never even written a novel before - much less had one published - it seems like a big waste of an important person's time to ask a bunch of questions.

Comments? Jeers? Ridicule? Any input would be more activity on this board, and also helpful to me!

ltd.

Thrillride
02-28-2007, 12:53 AM
Hmmm. It is kinda quiet over here. To tell you the truth (very embarassing) but I just didn't get this far on this site. Everytime I looked for thriller/suspense I ended up at the share your work thriller/suspense.

Duh.

Seems like most people chat in the writing novels place. Are the fantasy writers chatting up a storm over in their spot? Or are they mostly at the novel spot too?

LOL! I'm reading this an it's like groups at school or something..."like are the peeps in the smoking area hanging around the jock's quad again?"

Oh! And can I put a shameless plug here for people to go peek at my chapter for crit? Or is that a no no?

limitedtimeauthor
02-28-2007, 01:58 AM
Who's gonna notice? ;) Just kidding. I'm pretty sure it's fine to ask here.

ltd.

Thrillride
02-28-2007, 02:10 AM
LOLOLOL! You kill me, LTD!
You do have a point.
We could probably run around nekkid here and be unobserved!

Cassiopeia
02-28-2007, 02:46 AM
well i am in for the count...I am a mystery/thriller/suspense writer. I didn't really stop to think about this specific forum and always post in the novel writing section but hey! I will participate.

So ..here is a question for you guys..have you ever been writing through the eyes of a killer and gotten so freaked out that you could write such a convincineg scene that you wondered if you were losing your mind and were in danger of becoming like what you wrote?

I had that experience back four years ago and stopped writing because of it.

Just wonderin'

Cassiopeia
02-28-2007, 02:47 AM
LOLOLOL! You kill me, LTD!
You do have a point.
We could probably run around nekkid here and be unobserved!As long as you discreatly post the pics...I don't mind :) Umm...edited to add...I should have said..I won't tell :)

Thrillride
02-28-2007, 03:26 AM
Casi said:

So ..here is a question for you guys..have you ever been writing through the eyes of a killer and gotten so freaked out that you could write such a convincineg scene that you wondered if you were losing your mind and were in danger of becoming like what you wrote?



Not exactly, but I could soooo go there. I got so into writing the sex scene from a womanizer man's point oif view, I was absolutely giddy.

I also just saw Hannibal Rising. I came out of there realizing that I have to quit telling people I write thriller/horror.
I do not write horror.
At least not that kind (realizing there's more than one way to write horror).

I was freaked out in the sense that you are talking about because I thought, "What if I wrote scenes like that? I don't want to know if that could come out of me."

Now, my friends, I don't normally write cut-em-up-hack-em-up scenes, but I will tell you I could.

These are not the scenes that frighten me.

Did anyone see the film yet? Or read the book?I don't want to say what the senes are in case I give something away - it's the reason Hannibal went in sane to begin with.

It was the most disgusting thing EVER.

Ah...um...what was the question again, Casi??

Thrillride
02-28-2007, 03:29 AM
Oh yeah, and trust me, if I was running around nekkid, you would tell the whole board and then move it to "humor"!

Cassiopeia
02-28-2007, 03:29 AM
Not exactly, but I could soooo go there. I got so into writing the sex scene from a womanizer man's point oif view, I was absolutely giddy.

I also just saw Hannibal Rising. I came out of there realizing that I have to quit telling people I write thriller/horror. I don't write horror. At least not that kind (realizing there's more than one way to write horror).

I was freaked out in the sense that you are talking about because I thought, "What if I wrote scenes like that? I don't want to know if that could come out of me."

Now, my friends, I don't normally write cut-em-up-hack-em-up scenes, but I will tell you I could.

These are not the scenes that frighten me.

Did anyone see the film yet? Or read the book?I don't want to say what the senes are in case I give something away - it's the reason Hannibal went in sane to begin with.

It was the most disgusting thing EVER.

Ah...um...what was the question again, Casi??
Hehe..you answered it...I think you said it very well...there are somethings I don't want to come out of me or know if it could. There are some things I won't do and I would never write a horror film.

Someone asked me the other day this.."IF..your book became a best seller and "they" want to make a movie out of it..how will you control content?"
Man I thought about that...and I was actually getting upset in advance...and thought...I amgoing to have to be certain that it doesn't get changed. Don't know how but I will. :)

Thrillride
02-28-2007, 03:58 AM
Well, yanno, Thomas Harris (the author) wrote the screenplay for this movie too. Pretty much got handed creative control.

See? You can demand the same thing.

Cassiopeia
02-28-2007, 04:08 AM
Well, yanno, Thomas Harris (the author) wrote the screenplay for this movie too. Pretty much got handed creative control.

See? You can demand the same thing.Okay...it is just this...in today's movies...there is all this graphic stuff and swearing and sex..when the author doesn't even put that in there sometimes.

So...I think it would be really cool to insinuate the violence without going into alot of detail...my story is SEX free...not romance free...and the romance is light..that is not what the book is about...but anyway..and swearing is minimal...no F word..no horribly demeaning words...

I guess some people think you can't do that and have an exciting story..so I figured the first thing they would want to do is juice it up to today's movie standards which I refuse to have done. I hate the way hollywood changes everything. okay end rant.

Thrillride
02-28-2007, 04:21 AM
You know, I am thinking of some wonderful movies that seem nice like, A Walk to Remember...I don't think there is all the extra fluff in that one. I can think of a few more, but I am horrible with titles..

Cassiopeia
02-28-2007, 04:35 AM
You know, I am thinking of some wonderful movies that seem nice like, A Walk to Remember...I don't think there is all the extra fluff in that one. I can think of a few more, but I am horrible with titles.. A walk to remember is a great film. But when is the last time you saw a mystery/suspense/thriller without graphically gory scenes? And I don't know why people think they have to put the F word in their stories..because if they do it for the rating thinking more people will watch it if it goes to R. But in my last semster film production class they showed us the stats that say..PG has more attendance than R in actuality.

I dunno, I don't want to offend anyone...I just don't think we have to talk like gutter rats to get a good story spun.

Thrillride
02-28-2007, 04:42 AM
Casi said:

I dunno, I don't want to offend anyone...I just don't think we have to talk like gutter rats to get a good story spun.


You're right, of course.

Lemmee think awhile about some thrillers that son't have those words...although "Storm of the Century" (Stephen King) just hit my head. I'll call my brother (he works in the industry and ask him too).

The F word is actually in my novel. So far, only one time. It is, unfortunately something I think my character would say at this particular turn of events.

While in no way do I feel I ever need to add anything that I don't feel belongs in my stories, I also remain true to my characters and their situations and if it needs to be said or done, I'll do it.

Honestly, when a story is done well, I don't think I would notice at all that someone left out the in gratuitous sex, profanity or gore.

Good writing is just good writing.

Cassiopeia
02-28-2007, 04:45 AM
You're right, of course.

Lemmee think awhile about some thrillers that son't have those words...although "Storm of the Century" (Stephen King) just hit my head. I'll call my brother (he works in the industry and ask him too).

The F word is actually in my novel. So far, only one time. It is, unfortunately something I think my character would say at this particular turn of events.

While in no way do I feel I ever need to add anything that I don't feel belongs in my stories, I also remain true to my characters and their situations and if it needs to be said or done, I'll do it.

Honestly, when a story is done well, I don't think I would notice at all that someone left out the in gratuitous sex, profanity or gore.

Good writing is just good writing.I am all for people writing true to their characters being created. What I hate is when a studio insists on it to boost potential sales.

Thrillride
02-28-2007, 04:50 AM
I hear ya. I do prefer when they stay close to the novel writer's intentions.

Cassiopeia
02-28-2007, 04:55 AM
I hear ya. I do prefer when they stay close to the novel writer's intentions.I would really like to know just how much say a new writer would have in that situation if it went to a movie. In fact..I just thought..I wonder how closely the Harry Potter films are to the books. I haven't read them.

I was pleased to see the Chronicles of Narnia and LOR were pretty close.

Mae
02-28-2007, 05:29 AM
Holy crow - a virtual smorgasborg of posts while I was away at work - this is great.I have been so lonely!

To LTA: "Because I guess another thing that is bugging me is that if you've never even written a novel before - much less had one published - it seems like a big waste of an important person's time to ask a bunch of questions."

I am experiencing this right now. I am leery of approaching a stranger, so have sent out a search email (to everyone I know well) asking if they know anyone in the areas I am seeking info about. I am hoping I will feel more comfortable if we have someone in common. Does that make sense?
******************
To CAS: "So ..here is a question for you guys..have you ever been writing through the eyes of a killer and gotten so freaked out that you could write such a convincing scene that you wondered if you were losing your mind and were in danger of becoming like what you wrote?"

YES! I have written this way, I love to write this way, and I used to be bothered by it... decades later I am ok with it. This is not a reflection on who I am, although it sure affects how some others see ME when they read it. I am uncomfortable with that, yet at the same time, very pleased they feel that way because it means I can creep them ( and myself ! ) out with words.

To CAS: "I would really like to know just how much say a new writer would have in that situation if it went to a movie. In fact..I just thought..I wonder how closely the Harry Potter films are to the books. I haven't read them."

I have read all the HP books, although it has been a while, and the last one seemed to drrraaaaggg.... except for dropping out some scenes, the movies so far, have remained pretty true. Good question: I too wonder what a new writer might agree to have done to their novel just to see it on the big screen...

CheshireCat
03-03-2007, 02:29 AM
So ..here is a question for you guys..have you ever been writing through the eyes of a killer and gotten so freaked out that you could write such a convincineg scene that you wondered if you were losing your mind and were in danger of becoming like what you wrote?

I had that experience back four years ago and stopped writing because of it.

Just wonderin'


Not that specifically. I have creeped myself out at the ease with which truly horrific things like torture and mutilation found their way from my mind and into my stories.

Gave me pause, I can tell you that.

But then, I've written about a lot of stuff I had absolutely no firsthand knowledge or, nor inclincation to learn more about or try, so what the hell.

I do remember that after writing an extended set of scenes containing a skin-crawlingly evil villain, I went straight to the shower and spent an unusual amount of time scrubbing.

:e2chain:

CheshireCat
03-03-2007, 02:37 AM
I would really like to know just how much say a new writer would have in that situation if it went to a movie. In fact..I just thought..I wonder how closely the Harry Potter films are to the books. I haven't read them.

I was pleased to see the Chronicles of Narnia and LOR were pretty close.


Unless you have a LOT of clout, once you sell film or dramatic rights to your work, you have only as much control as your agent was able to negotiate or the producers/director allow. Some authors are allowed to see the script, even encouraged to offer suggestions or make complaints. But, for the most part, it's your book -- and their film.

LOR turned out so well because Peter Jackson was a huge fan and felt a responsibility to film the stories he had loved as a reader. If you're very lucky, you'll get that sort of director.

You're far more likely to get a director with his/her own idea of what your story is about, likely complicated by the demands of the studio or distributors.

If you ever get lucky enough to have a movie sale, my advice is sign the contract, cash the check, and wait to see what their movie is going to look like.

Cassiopeia
03-03-2007, 02:50 AM
Unless you have a LOT of clout, once you sell film or dramatic rights to your work, you have only as much control as your agent was able to negotiate or the producers/director allow. Some authors are allowed to see the script, even encouraged to offer suggestions or make complaints. But, for the most part, it's your book -- and their film.

LOR turned out so well because Peter Jackson was a huge fan and felt a responsibility to film the stories he had loved as a reader. If you're very lucky, you'll get that sort of director.

You're far more likely to get a director with his/her own idea of what your story is about, likely complicated by the demands of the studio or distributors.

If you ever get lucky enough to have a movie sale, my advice is sign the contract, cash the check, and wait to see what their movie is going to look like.
Yeah I guess I shouldn't be so attached to my work LOL

JDCrayne
03-03-2007, 03:23 AM
Good question: I too wonder what a new writer might agree to have done to their novel just to see it on the big screen...

I write cozy mysteries about a good-natured small town cop. If the Big Screen wanted to play him as a one-legged transvestite with green hair, I'd cry all the way to the bank.

CheshireCat
03-04-2007, 02:42 AM
I write cozy mysteries about a good-natured small town cop. If the Big Screen wanted to play him as a one-legged transvestite with green hair, I'd cry all the way to the bank.


Exactly.

And I have to add, based on my experiences and the experiences of friends, Hollywood is even more nuts than publishing. With the not-so-fun bonus of emotional excess. They can convince you today that you're the greatest thing since the invention of the microchip, and tomorrow not have a clue what your name is.

:e2paperba

Kate Thornton
03-05-2007, 10:57 PM
Wow, take a few days off and the place explodes with activity!

Re: movies
Folks, if you sell your work to a production company or movie studio, chances are you won't have much say in how it is brought to the screen unless you are contracted to write the screenplay. The easy answer is if you want to maintain creative control either don't sell it or make the movie yourself.

I have had options on several of my short stories for films, and if they ever get picked up, I will be delighted to turn over the whole thing for a lot of money and not care what happens to it.

Remember, it will be the Producer's money and the Director's vision. If you want to see where the Writer fits in, watch "The Player" again. That place where the writer is murdered? That's right behind my favorite movie theater (The Rialto) and my favorite sushi bar (The Ai) - and that guy was a Screenwriter and wrote movies for a living!

It's always fun to play "what if" - that's how I get most of the material for my mysteries - and sometimes really great movies get made from first time novels. Sometimes they even stay pretty true to the book, too. But remember that screenwriting encompasses so much: getting the story to the screen, then re-writing it to the Director's vision. Then maybe watching the actors re-write the dialogue on the spot, or the costume designer dress the characters funny or the set designer totally misinterpret the interiors.

It's a thrill to get someone interested in your work - my friend Sue Ann Jaffarian, who writes the Odelia Grey plus-sized mysteries, just had a couple of her books optioned (I think they are Too Big to Miss and The Curse of the Holy Pail) - I am so excited for her, but we both live in Southern California, so we are pragmatic about the industry. She is thrilled, and rightly so. She even had a famous plus-size actress call her up to chat about the character.

I wish her - and all of you - the very best. And good movies have to come from somewhere, so why not from you?