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Dixie
02-17-2007, 09:35 PM
To yourself, that is when you are reviewing it for errors? I find that when I read it out loud to myself I am able to catch more mistakes. Silent reading causes my mind to gloss over errors because I know what I'm saying, and I never 'see' the errors. But if I hear the errors I am more likely to catch them and correct as needed. Anyone else?

stormie
02-17-2007, 09:41 PM
Oh, yeah, I do. A lot. It does catch errors that I normally would miss in silent reading. Only problem is, if someone is around and they hear me saying, "Don't touch that knife! No! Aaaaa...! They come running.

J. Weiland
02-17-2007, 09:46 PM
Sure. Easier to hear what flows and what doesn't.

I haven't tried it in public, though. Might be a dare for the new year. :D

kristie911
02-17-2007, 09:46 PM
I've heard it helps to read it outloud...and I can see why. But I have a deep-seated fear of reading outloud, so I tend not to do it. (I used to stutter and being teased when I was younger has scarred me for life, I think) I'm sure I would catch a lot more errors if I would though.

And, yes, that fear is present even when I'm reading alone. But I still read to my son because he doesn't care if I do stutter, which I do very, very rarely now.

Susan B
02-17-2007, 09:53 PM
Yes, I do at times.

I also recently discovered that my computer's word processing program has a "speech" feature. So I can hear my words read in a computer-generated female voice that sounds vaguely Eastern European. Strange but helpful!

Susan

PS I use a mac with microsoft word.

Azure Skye
02-17-2007, 10:01 PM
I just learned how much this works a few days ago when I read some of my ms aloud. Wow.

stormie
02-17-2007, 10:03 PM
I also recently discovered that my computer's word processing program has a "speech" feature. So I can hear my words read in a computer-generated female voice that sounds vaguely Eastern European. Strange but helpful!
My computer is six years old and Word is ancient so I don't have it, but I've heard of that speech feature. Good idea.

Rich
02-17-2007, 10:10 PM
I've never read my work aloud. I think my aloud is some kind of built in thing.

roach
02-17-2007, 11:35 PM
Yep. I spent three Sundays reading through my manuscript in January. I caught a lot of errors, but also I found where my word choices didn't work, where dialog was clunky, etc. This was much more helpful as I always feel that my writing is flat and hearing it aloud showed me not only where my writing failed but also where it worked.

brianm
02-17-2007, 11:44 PM
Absolutely! I read everything aloud and act out scenes.

Mae
02-17-2007, 11:48 PM
Yep. I spent three Sundays reading through my manuscript in January. I caught a lot of errors, but also I found where my word choices didn't work, where dialog was clunky, etc.

I had to think about this.. I realized that I do for my articles and shorter works, but never have for my longer ones... I agree with roach though... so I will be making a point to do some aloud readings of those novels ASAP
:Sun:

lfraser
02-17-2007, 11:50 PM
I haven't done this much, but last night as I was reading a book the cadence of a particular passage was so compelling that I stopped and read it aloud to myself, just to hear the way the words formed. I could see why the writer had used exactly the words and punctuation that she did. So I think I will try more reading aloud - especially for dialogue, which is something I struggle with.

TheIT
02-17-2007, 11:51 PM
I read snippets to my writing group, and I plan to read my novel aloud to myself once I get to the revision stage. Something about speaking the words helps me find places to make the words flow better. If I'm tripping over my tongue reading them aloud, I figure the reader will be stumbling, too.

Rich
02-18-2007, 01:01 AM
Am I the only one who doesn't read his work aloud?

Shadow_Ferret
02-18-2007, 01:07 AM
I can't stand the sound of my own voice. So, no, I don't read it aloud.

PeeDee
02-18-2007, 01:36 AM
I read out loud to check my work, I read out loud to other people, I read other people's work out loud to other people. I think storytelling is one of the greatest things in the world, especially verbal storytelling.

It's a valuable tool, because when I'm writing, I find that I'm writing unconsciously gearing toward how I would want to read it out loud. It makes the text a lot sharper and smoother.

Rich
02-18-2007, 01:39 AM
I do poetry and prose and I've never read aloud. Maybe the voices are occurring in my head. Maybe it's just different strokes for different folks.

Mr. Fix
02-18-2007, 01:46 AM
As a Broadcasting Student (who was invited to leave the school for hogging the mic) It is truly amazing how different the written word is from the spoken word. I attend readings at a local book store that has various 'invited guest' to read from there works. I believe reading out loud cetainly helps with the 'flow.' Besides, if you become famous, you'll need to attend readings of your own work, right?

KTC
02-18-2007, 01:49 AM
Whether I am writing an article for a newspaper or magazine, fiction, poetry, or a grocery list...I always read it aloud. I think it's one of the most important steps of self editing. You catch more when you put it into the air. I wouldn't consider submitting anything prior to reading it aloud...no matter how long it is. I always tell others to do the same too. And, if they've never done it before, they thank me for the suggestion.

DeadlyAccurate
02-18-2007, 01:52 AM
It's the last editing step I take. I read the entire book out loud, looking for less than natural dialog, word repetition, unnecessary scenes/paragraph/adverbs.

I edit on paper, on the computer, read the whole book over a couple of days to check flow, read aloud, read silently. There's not much I don't do when I edit.

heatherleacubs
02-18-2007, 01:53 AM
I do read it out loud. I also speak it outloud as I'm writing, particularly with dialogue. It really helps when I'm struggling to find a word.

Soccer Mom
02-18-2007, 01:53 AM
I read everything aloud. But most especially, I read my children's stuff aloud. It's designed to be read TO children as well as BY children. It must pass the read aloud test. I first read it to my dogs. (This is why you should all have dogs.) Then after it's more polished, I read it to humans.

Seriously. You should all have dogs.

PeeDee
02-18-2007, 01:55 AM
I read everything aloud. But most especially, I read my children's stuff aloud. It's designed to be read TO children as well as BY children. It must pass the read aloud test. I first read it to my dogs. (This is why you should all have dogs.) Then after it's more polished, I read it to humans.

Seriously. You should all have dogs.

I read to the cats. They never like anything I write. It's so depressing.

Soccer Mom
02-18-2007, 01:56 AM
Exactly my point. The dogs will build your ego. The cats will crush it.

PeeDee
02-18-2007, 01:57 AM
Maybe I'll read to the rats, or the gerbils. They're happy about all things.

My wife would love the dog to read to (or just, a dog). But you could bring the sweetest soppiest dog int he world into our house, and it would instantly turn into a murderous killer who would maul me.

latoya
02-18-2007, 02:04 AM
I read almost everything aloud. I catch errors more grammatical, struture, and flow errors that way.

Rich
02-18-2007, 02:10 AM
I liike the silent brooding of my work.

PeeDee
02-18-2007, 02:10 AM
Why yes, this would be a good time to re-mention my Out Loud Challenge (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=51879)thread that exists over in our Share Your Work area, to which you should contribute.

Mae
02-18-2007, 02:22 AM
:) thanks for the hint!

PeeDee
02-18-2007, 02:24 AM
I'm glad you caught my hint, I was worried I was being too subtle. :) (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=51879)

Mae
02-18-2007, 02:25 AM
:roll:

Rich
02-18-2007, 02:48 AM
I went there, Peedee. I'm willing to voice my work, but only after it goes to the editors. All's I gotta do is figure out how to voice it.

PeeDee
02-18-2007, 02:54 AM
I went there, Peedee. I'm willing to voice my work, but only after it goes to the editors. All's I gotta do is figure out how to voice it.

Somewhere in that thread, I go into detail on that (I think.) A computer microphone of decent quality is cheap. Mine, with headset, cost twenty dollars and it's a high quality set.

There's a program called "WavePad Recorder" that you can get from downloads.com which does a good job,or you can use just the Sound Recorder that comes with windows and then download a WAV to MP3 converter (because if you just use the .WAV file, it'll be 140 million billion megabytes big)

Rich
02-18-2007, 03:01 AM
On this first reading, that doesn't make sense to me. But I'll figure it out and give it a shot.

Maprilynne
02-18-2007, 09:04 AM
After I think I'm done I read through my books once out loud and slowly and every time my tounge trips on a phrase I go back and rework it. Then I read through it again at a normal pace and make sure everything still works. It is, in my opinion, a lifesaver.

But it will make you damn sick of your book!

Maprilynne

roach
02-18-2007, 09:08 AM
For anyone reading their novel out loud make sure you stock up on water and throat lozenges. Once I was finished reading my work I spent a week or so with a sore throat.

PeeDee
02-18-2007, 10:17 AM
For anyone reading their novel out loud make sure you stock up on water and throat lozenges. Once I was finished reading my work I spent a week or so with a sore throat.

Actually, that's a good discussion to have.

For example, I don't go with throat lozenges or cough drops of any sort, because the sugar in them makes my lips slightly sticky, and then the sound carries on the microphone.

I drink water. Generally, not from a bottle, because that can make noises too. Just water out of a cup.

I don't drink tea before or during reading, because tea dries out my mouth and lips.

I know one guy who swears by lemon-aid before and during speaking. He says it cuts down on saliva in the mouth, and helps him enunciate better. I'm not a huge fan of lemon-aid, but I haven't noticed one way or the other.

Jamesaritchie
02-18-2007, 02:58 PM
I think reading aloud can help most writers, but I don't do so. I don't find it necessary, and I've have a sore throat on a permanent basis.

I do have to read a fair amount of my work into a mic and convert to MP3 or WAV. I don't use the Windows tools, however. Too primitive. I use either Audacity or Express burn, depending on just what I want to do. Express burn gives me a CD that can be played on a home CD unit, or in a car.

But I hate the sound of my own voice, so these are not made for my ears, thank goodness.

PeeDee
02-18-2007, 06:17 PM
I'm not overly fond of the sound of my own voice either. I couldn't listen to myself reading something and enjoy it.

(In fact, when recording the above files, I listened randomly to ten seconds of the file once done to make sure it recorded...and then stopped. I don't listen to myself on playback.)

The useful bits for me are gained during the reading, not on a playback. If I were trying to learn things about my story by listening to it read back to me, I wouldn't get anything. I'd be too distracted by my own voice.

But if I'm reading out loud, it's mean for the entertainment of others, and so I let THEM hear my voice, because it won't sound like it does in my head.

It's the idea of reading out loud that's important to me when I'm writing. I'll smooth out a sentence, or change the tone of another sentence, because unconsciously I'm testing how it would sound read out loud.

Maprilynne
02-18-2007, 09:51 PM
I HATE listening to myself on tape or vidoe. Blech!!

Maprilynne

PeeDee
02-18-2007, 10:04 PM
So don't listen. Just read out loud. The most listening you need to do is listening to your story as you're reading it. You don't HAVE to record yourself and listen to the playback.