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Sohia Rose
02-14-2007, 06:59 PM
I'm terrible at this. How do you write this number in words? "35,078"

Thanks!

JanDarby
02-14-2007, 07:08 PM
Thirty-five thousand seventy-eight.

JD

Siddow
02-14-2007, 07:08 PM
Just like you'd say it:
Thirty-five thousand and seventy-eight.

jst5150
02-14-2007, 07:11 PM
Thirty-five thousand, seventy eight. Using 'and' connotes a decimal point.

truelyana
02-14-2007, 07:12 PM
Thirty-five thousand seventy-eight

Jamesaritchie
02-14-2007, 07:14 PM
Yep, no "and." Although I might use "and" in dialogue, IF I thought the character would.

Judg
02-14-2007, 07:26 PM
And now... why? Longer numbers are usually "spelled" in digital form.

Jamesaritchie
02-14-2007, 09:59 PM
And now... why? Longer numbers are usually "spelled" in digital form.

Not in dialogue. Or they shouldn't be.

robeiae
02-15-2007, 01:22 AM
Yep, no "and." Although I might use "and" in dialogue, IF I thought the character would.
In that respect, you might write "three five oh seven eight" or the like, for dialogue, if that's how the character would say it. I string out numbers like that in business talk or whenever the person I'm talking to might be writing down what I'm saying for some reason.

Silver King
02-15-2007, 03:45 AM
Here's a useful conversion site (http://www.easysurf.cc/cnvert18.htm) that helps put numbers into words.

scarletpeaches
02-15-2007, 03:48 AM
Thirty five thousand and seventy eight.

The 'and' doesn't signify a decimal point, at least in the UK. And numbers should always be spelled out in prose.

(Different if you're writing out sums or a table of contents, of course).

Siddow
02-15-2007, 04:58 AM
Here's a useful conversion site (http://www.easysurf.cc/cnvert18.htm) that helps put numbers into words.

Thirty-five thousand, seventy-eight dollars and zero cents?

Yeah, that's how I'd write it. On a check.

OP, it's up to you. How would you say it? If I told you I'd sell you my house for $35,078, and you knew it was worth 200k, how would you tell your S/O? "Oh my, sweetie, you should see the place...four bedrooms, three baths, a pool...and she's only asking for...(finish the sentence)"

Sohia Rose
02-15-2007, 05:45 AM
Thanks.

I know how I'd say it, but I'd like to write it the correct way. This number is not "dollars." It's a figure starting a sentence.

Sohia Rose
02-15-2007, 05:48 AM
Here's a useful conversion site (http://www.easysurf.cc/cnvert18.htm) that helps put numbers into words.


I noticed a ".cc" at the end of the web address. What country is that? I'm in the U.S. Does the rules still apply?

Silver King
02-15-2007, 06:25 AM
Thirty-five thousand, seventy-eight dollars and zero cents?

Yeah, that's how I'd write it. On a check.
That's correct. And if you scroll down a quarter page, when the number is entered to convert ordinal numbers into words, the answer is thirty-five thousand seventy-eight. I thought the OP was requesting help converting numbers, not dollars, into words.

Silver King
02-15-2007, 06:26 AM
I'm in the U.S. Does the rules still apply?
Yes.

Sohia Rose
02-15-2007, 06:44 AM
Thirty-five thousand seventy-eight

I wrote it this way originally, but I put a "comma" after "thousand."

Silver King
02-15-2007, 07:10 AM
I wrote it this way originally, but I put a "comma" after "thousand."
Unlike when numbers are used, the words are not separated by commas.

pdr
02-15-2007, 07:48 AM
it's as Scarlet Peaches said. It's just the Americans who leave out the and.

The rest of us say one thousand and one, or two million, six hundred thousand and fifty four.

I was most interested to hear that James R says you do this because the and equals a decimal point. Never heard that before.

Silver King
02-15-2007, 08:10 AM
It's just the Americans who leave out the and.
Just Americans?

For once, we can't be accused of excess. ;)

Bartholomew
02-15-2007, 08:41 AM
Just like you'd say it:
Thirty-five thousand and seventy-eight.

You just said 35.000,78

You want to say 35.078, right?

I've never heard anyone say adding and is correct unless you're adding a decimal point.

Thirty-five thousand seventy-eight is correct.

Sohia Rose
02-15-2007, 09:10 AM
... Thirty-five thousand, seventy-eight is correct.

Humph. That's how I originally wrote it. :Shrug:

Silver King
02-15-2007, 09:13 AM
Humph. That's how I originally wrote it. :Shrug:
Take out the comma, and it's perfect.

Bartholomew
02-15-2007, 09:22 AM
Take out the comma, and it's perfect.

Ditto, by the way. ;)

"Take out the comma and it's perfect."

*Flees*


---Edit---

Comma? What comma? I see no comma?

Jamesaritchie
02-15-2007, 07:01 PM
it's as Scarlet Peaches said. It's just the Americans who leave out the and.

The rest of us say one thousand and one, or two million, six hundred thousand and fifty four.

I was most interested to hear that James R says you do this because the and equals a decimal point. Never heard that before.

This is actually one of those rules I believe to be stupid, and I have no idea why Americans insist on it. If you listen to Americans talk, even bankers, mathematicians, English majors, etc., they almost always use the "and" in actual dialogue.

I suppose I understand the logic behind the rule, but it's still a rule almost no one, anywhere, even Americans, follows in actual dialogue.

Sohia Rose
02-15-2007, 07:16 PM
...
I suppose I understand the logic behind the rule, but it's still a rule almost no one, anywhere, even Americans, follows in actual dialogue.

You see why I had a problem with this. :o The how it's supposed to be written, and how I would say it.

Jamesaritchie
02-15-2007, 08:54 PM
You see why I had a problem with this. :o The how it's supposed to be written, and how I would say it.

Yes, I definitely see the problem. When I'm writing dialogue, I always write the way a character would actually speak, regardless of what rule I might be breaking.

scarletpeaches
02-15-2007, 09:04 PM
If it's dialogue, ignore all the rules and write it how your character would say it. Dialogue, if you listen to conversation closely (a good excuse to eavesdrop!), is rarely grammatically correct.

The 'and' thing seems logical to me, "Thirty-five thousand and seventy-eight." Although, for some reason, it only applies before the tens/units. If it was 35,700, we'd say "Thirty-five thousand, seven hundred," not "-and seven hundred."

In the UK, we don't use 'and' to denote a comma or any other punctuation mark, but we do say 'point' for the decimal point.

Siddow
02-15-2007, 09:12 PM
I'm confused about the 'and' standing in for a decimal point. I understand 'and' to mean 'plus'. 35,000 + 78 = 35,078. Like, "Four score and seven years ago..." wouldn't mean four score point seven years ago.

*scratching head, but glad Sohia Rose has found the solution.*

Jamesaritchie
02-15-2007, 10:10 PM
I'm confused about the 'and' standing in for a decimal point. I understand 'and' to mean 'plus'. 35,000 + 78 = 35,078. Like, "Four score and seven years ago..." wouldn't mean four score point seven years ago.

*scratching head, but glad Sohia Rose has found the solution.*

In America, the "and" is used for numbers with fractions. Thirty-eight and three fourths, for example, which is 38.75. The "and" is the decimal.

It doesn't apply in your example because no one would ever use "and" to say "eighty-seven."

I do think this is a very silly rule when taken to extremes. I don't think many really stop to considr whether it's used properly. They see the "and" and react. If I say, "They got away with three thousand and fifty dollars," I don't think I'm breaking the rule at all because teh "and" is not placed where a decimal would go. And if I say, "They got away with three thousand, fifty dollars, and ten cents," I'm still not breaking the rule.
Why? Because I end with "dollars" and "cents."

This should tell anyone we aren't talking about fractions, but whole amounts.

Using "and" as a decimal is a very good thing, when it's done right. But saying you can't use "and" when you aren't talking about decimals is just pure silliness. Because you should use it one way in no way makes it improper to use another way.

I'd even say people who try to make this a rule are dead wrong. The reason we say "eighty-seven: instead of eighty and seven, is because of the hyphen. "And" should never replace a hyphen.

But "and" means "in addition to," and when you come to a portion of any number that isn't hyphenated, I'd go so far as to the using "and" is much better grammar than leaving it out.

Del
02-15-2007, 11:49 PM
I think we are just accustomed to tidying things up with and.

I stayed with John, Paul and Tim.

I earned one-hundred and fifty points.

I spent one-billion six-hundred-million seventy-thousand and four dollars.

If and was needed wouldn't it be needed all the way through?

I spent one-billion and six-hundred-million and seventy-thousand and four dollars. I'm overthinking again...

But isn't it dollars and cents?

Saying one-hundred and fifty dollars seems the same as saying dollars and dollars.

scarletpeaches
02-16-2007, 02:04 AM
Like I said before, tens and units don't use the and, but hundreds and anything bigger would.

Hence, no 'and' in eighty-seven, but we would say one hundred and eighty-seven.

Moon Daughter
02-20-2007, 08:15 AM
Thirty-five thousand, seventy eight. Using 'and' connotes a decimal point.

Wouldn't using a comma indicate two separate numbers?

Jamesaritchie
02-20-2007, 06:02 PM
I think we are just accustomed to tidying things up with and.

I stayed with John, Paul and Tim.

I earned one-hundred and fifty points.

I spent one-billion six-hundred-million seventy-thousand and four dollars.

If and was needed wouldn't it be needed all the way through?

I spent one-billion and six-hundred-million and seventy-thousand and four dollars. I'm overthinking again...

But isn't it dollars and cents?

Saying one-hundred and fifty dollars seems the same as saying dollars and dollars.

Commas are needed, and you didn't use them. The commas replace the "and." And you spend way too much money.