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Paul J. Andrew
08-02-2006, 02:04 AM
I don't know what to think. I knocked it out in about three days of medium/heavy read time. I feel very torn about how I should feel about these books. On the one hand, I must continue reading to the very end to see how things conclude in the storyline. On the other hand, these characters (with few exceptions) all speak very much the same (and at great length) in wide swaths of dialogue. Speaking of dialogue... these characters all talk in long drawn out monologues, more often than not as if they are talking directly to the reader than to whomever they are supposed to be talking to in the story. And yet, despite how aggravating I find this, I must continue to the end of the series. It makes me wonder if that is some kind of writers badge - the ability to annoy the hell out of your reader and yet keep them hooked because of how much they care about your longwinded characters.

My-Immortal
08-02-2006, 04:47 AM
I enjoyed the first couple SoT books and pushed on through to "Naked Empire" but I just couldn't read any more...which is sad...because I actually liked the characters/story at the beginning.

Paul J. Andrew
08-02-2006, 07:50 AM
bah, you can almost skip Pillars of Creation and Naked Empire. They didn't seem to have any affect on the over all plot. Chainfire was good, as was Phantom, but this neverending philosophizing by the characters is just... tiring.

MadScientistMatt
08-21-2006, 06:12 PM
An evil overlord is preparing to attempt a spell that will give him ultimate power if he succeeds - and will kill him if he fails. A good wizard charges a youth with stopping him. If you've read a reasonable number of fantasy, you just know how this is going to end from that premise.

Have you ever wondered what motivates evil overlords to try such spells? The evil overlord of this story, Darken Rahl, already is so powerful he can dominate the world without any more power. But no, he has to get ahold of the Three Boxes of Orden so he can have enough power to be even more unstoppable, even though opening the wrong box would spell disaster. Why? Do wizards collect magical ability like Jay Leno collects cars? Is it just some sort of insecurity? We never find out, at least not in this story.

Darken Rahl is pretty much your standard evil overlord. Terry Goodkind did give him one good twist, though. Darken is a vegitarian. That alone wouldn't be too interesting - a little wierd, but not without historical precedend in our world. Well, one of Darken's important spells involves ritual canibalism. That in itself would give him a few evil points, but the fact that he has to break his own moral code to do this spell and uses it routinely anyway ratchets his evil up a few notches. Other than that, well, he's just another two dimensional evil wizard out to conquer the world.

The forshadowing was often a bit too obvious, and not just for the overall ending. I had figured out one important plot "twist" several hundred pages before the characters did, even when they had enough information to make it blatantly obvious to them.

But I liked this book anyway. While some details of the ending were all too obvious, he had hidden a few secrets that I really wanted to turn the page to find out about. He had a set of main characters that I really did care about. And I didn't know just how they would achieve the inevitable ending. This world also had some rather interesting magical ideas, such as casting spells by creating magical paintings.

They say that many plots that have been done before can still make pretty good books if given a strong treatment. I'd say that this book is proof that's true.

Paul J. Andrew
08-22-2006, 01:48 AM
Its too bad the rest of the series isn't as strong as book one...

clara bow
08-22-2006, 02:01 AM
I really wanted to like this book, because a friend strongly recommended it. Unfortunately, I thought there was a real disconnect on many levels. It read like an R-rated book for teen (13-15) boys. I like mature themes in fantasy, too, so it really added to my disappointment. Richard seemed like a fairly passive character because a good number of helpful objects/info were practically just given to him.

I did enjoy Zedís character, and the Confessor concept.

FalconDance
08-22-2006, 06:38 PM
If you follow the series, many of these questions are answered.

Actually, I found each book to be stronger than the last; the story definitely takes direction and contains a very potent message.

Vincent
08-23-2006, 12:44 AM
I really dug the first... I think four, books. Then, I'm sorry to say, I started to feel a bit uneasy about the obvious political and social analogies he was using. It got a bit preachy.

Paul J. Andrew
08-24-2006, 07:50 AM
I don't mind the preachyness of the last several books, what I mind is the repetetiveness of said preachyness. It seems like he's beating me over the head with his particular world view every other page.

Silverhand
08-29-2006, 03:38 AM
I stopped reading at Book V. But, I remember that Wizards First Rule was one of the first fantasies I fell in love with and had to read in a single day. :)

Betty W01
09-01-2006, 07:26 PM
Can someone explain to me briefly his social/political WV, so I don't have to read them? This is DS#2's favorite series, and I'd love to figure out what he sees in it. I tried to read... just couldn't slog through them.

Luke flees the scene
02-12-2007, 09:26 AM
I dunno if there's been a thread about him before in the past, but has anyone ever read the Sword of Truth books? So far I'm to Temple of the Winds. This is the best book series I've ever read. I heard the later books in the series aren't as good though.

BottomlessCup
02-12-2007, 09:51 AM
I haven't read any of them yet, but I have two friends who are very, very into them.

I'll get around to them eventually. I don't like serieseses because if I like them, I end up reading the whole thing all in a row and get absolutely nothing done for a whole month. So the more they talk this series up, the further back I push it.

Maybe if I get in a horrible accident soon or something.

Vincent
02-12-2007, 10:05 AM
I loved the first... 4, I think. I read 3 in one week, almost no sleep. I have heard his latest is back to form, but to get there I'd have to slog through one half finished book and then another.

dgiharris
06-10-2007, 08:03 AM
My Terry Goodkind rant

The first few books were so amazing, so breathtaking, that I couldn't have been more hooked if he had laced the pages with crack cocaine. Those first few books were heading SOMEWHERE. The timing and pacing seemed flawless. The amount of detail and PLOT and action and PLOT and characterization and PLOT and suspense and PLOT and oh did I mention PLOT, where incredible. But then, around Temple of the winds, it seemed to me that some stuffy executive pulled him into a room and said, "You know you can't keep the pacing up like this, if you do, you'll finish the series in the next book or two. So I need you to strecth things out, go on some tangeants that have little to do with the original arc you established in the first few books."

But, I love the characters so much, that I sloughed through the other books, up until about naked Empire and chainfire. So now, i'm beyond annoyed. I feel betrayed. We are on what, book 9 and he still have very little control of his powers.

it is a shame. I find that I simply can't read the next book, chainfire was the last for me. The series is now akin to visiting an alcoholic parent behind bars... You love them, but it's just to painful to see them doing wrong. Well, that is my thoughts about this series. God I loved it, but enough is enough. Cant take it anymore. Which is a shame.

o.k. I feel better now.

Dgiharris

freethinker
06-10-2007, 08:59 AM
I stopped reading after Naked Empire as well. It was just too pathetic to keep reading after the glory that was Wizard's First Rule.

Death Wizard
06-10-2007, 06:40 PM
I enjoyed the first couple SoT books and pushed on through to "Naked Empire" but I just couldn't read any more...which is sad...because I actually liked the characters/story at the beginning.

I agree entirely.

The Lady
06-10-2007, 08:33 PM
I also gave up. They became pointless. I keep confusing Terry Goodkind's confused mess with Robert Jordan's confused mess anyhow, they've both gone on so long.

Death Wizard
06-10-2007, 08:56 PM
I also gave up. They became pointless. I keep confusing Terry Goodkind's confused mess with Robert Jordan's confused mess anyhow, they've both gone on so long.

I agree entirely with this, too! I should just wait for you guys to post and then tag my name to it.

althrasher
06-22-2007, 11:26 PM
I liked "Wizard's First Rule," but haven't read any of the others. The plots were nice and good, but I thought the characterization was not there. Also, I read it around the same time as "Eragon" and kept getting the two confused.

dgiharris
08-30-2007, 06:55 PM
My Terry Goodkind rant

The first few books were so amazing, so breathtaking, that I couldn't have been more hooked if he had laced the pages with crack cocaine. Those first few books were heading SOMEWHERE. The timing and pacing seemed flawless. The amount of detail and PLOT and action and PLOT and characterization and PLOT and suspense and PLOT and oh did I mention PLOT, where incredible. But then, around Temple of the winds, it seemed to me that some stuffy executive pulled him into a room and said, "You know you can't keep the pacing up like this, if you do, you'll finish the series in the next book or two. So I need you to strecth things out, go on some tangeants that have little to do with the original arc you established in the first few books."

But, I love the characters so much, that I sloughed through the other books, up until about naked Empire and chainfire. So now, i'm beyond annoyed. I feel betrayed. We are on what, book 9 and he still have very little control of his powers.

it is a shame. I find that I simply can't read the next book, chainfire was the last for me. The series is now akin to visiting an alcoholic parent behind bars... You love them, but it's just to painful to see them doing wrong. Well, that is my thoughts about this series. God I loved it, but enough is enough. Cant take it anymore. Which is a shame.

o.k. I feel better now.

Dgiharris

III
08-30-2007, 07:12 PM
My Terry Goodkind rant

The first few books were so amazing, so breathtaking, that I couldn't have been more hooked if he had laced the pages with crack cocaine. Those first few books were heading SOMEWHERE. The timing and pacing seemed flawless. The amount of detail and PLOT and action and PLOT and characterization and PLOT and suspense and PLOT and oh did I mention PLOT, where incredible. But then, around Temple of the winds, it seemed to me that some stuffy executive pulled him into a room and said, "You know you can't keep the pacing up like this, if you do, you'll finish the series in the next book or two. So I need you to strecth things out, go on some tangeants that have little to do with the original arc you established in the first few books."

But, I love the characters so much, that I sloughed through the other books, up until about naked Empire and chainfire. So now, i'm beyond annoyed. I feel betrayed. We are on what, book 9 and he still have very little control of his powers.

it is a shame. I find that I simply can't read the next book, chainfire was the last for me. The series is now akin to visiting an alcoholic parent behind bars... You love them, but it's just to painful to see them doing wrong. Well, that is my thoughts about this series. God I loved it, but enough is enough. Cant take it anymore. Which is a shame.

o.k. I feel better now.

Dgiharris

I'm largely in the same camp with you, Dgiharris, although I'm comitted to visiting that alcoholic parent until they are finally released or put out of their misery. I absolutely loved the first six books with Stone of Tears and Faith of the Fallen being my favorites and Blood of the Fold being the one I wasn't as crazy about. But when he hit Pillars of Creation, it was like hitting a brick wall. It had nothing to do with the rest of the series and was boring and tedious. Then with Naked Empire, he wratched up the tedious factor and filled hundreds of pages with pointless speeches from characters preaching things that the other characters already knew. Chainfire was a little bit better, but still had endless speeches.

Phantom started off weak, but I have to say the lasts half of it was a return to form. Goodkind came up with some genuinely interesting connundrums for all of the main characters and he's working (perhaps straining too hard) to tie in EVERY theme from each book of the series. It's a huge juggling act and he only has one book to pull everything together. I've invested this much time, so I'm gonna finish off the series. All I can say is, Richard bettter not open the boxes of Orden and "wish" Jagang and his army out of existence. Anyone wanna propose another ending?

I miss Gar.

III
08-30-2007, 07:14 PM
Can someone explain to me briefly his social/political WV, so I don't have to read them? This is DS#2's favorite series, and I'd love to figure out what he sees in it. I tried to read... just couldn't slog through them.

"Communism is bad". There. I just saved you about seven thousand pages of speeches. And I'm not being glib, either. That's the whole thing. Communism is bad.

Azraelsbane
08-30-2007, 07:14 PM
My Terry Goodkind rant

The first few books were so amazing, so breathtaking, that I couldn't have been more hooked if he had laced the pages with crack cocaine. Those first few books were heading SOMEWHERE. The timing and pacing seemed flawless. The amount of detail and PLOT and action and PLOT and characterization and PLOT and suspense and PLOT and oh did I mention PLOT, where incredible. But then, around Temple of the winds, it seemed to me that some stuffy executive pulled him into a room and said, "You know you can't keep the pacing up like this, if you do, you'll finish the series in the next book or two. So I need you to strecth things out, go on some tangeants that have little to do with the original arc you established in the first few books."

But, I love the characters so much, that I sloughed through the other books, up until about naked Empire and chainfire. So now, i'm beyond annoyed. I feel betrayed. We are on what, book 9 and he still have very little control of his powers.

it is a shame. I find that I simply can't read the next book, chainfire was the last for me. The series is now akin to visiting an alcoholic parent behind bars... You love them, but it's just to painful to see them doing wrong. Well, that is my thoughts about this series. God I loved it, but enough is enough. Cant take it anymore. Which is a shame.

o.k. I feel better now.

Dgiharris

100% agree, though I stopped reading after Blood of the Fold. WFR is still one of my all time favorite books, but I could tell by BotF that I would be in for another "Robert Jordanish" disaster if I read much more. Not to mention that, by then, I despised Richard with every bone in my body. He is such a whiny git.

Once I started reading LKH's Anita Blake series, I came to the conclusion it's something with the name. All Richards are losers.

Okay, I'm done ranting, though that wasn't much of a rant, especially compared to yours, DGI.

True North
09-04-2007, 01:54 AM
I really enjoyed the first few of the series, I could not read it after Pillars of Creation. I really lost interest at that point. It was the first fantasy novel I ever picked up and I now adore that genre. I really liked the characters, but I agree that he does tend to beat you over the head with his viewpoints. I tried to pick up the one right after Pillars, but even that, I could not read it. I have reread the first three though!

pconsidine
09-04-2007, 07:15 AM
Is he finished with the series yet? Or is he still squeezing that stone for a few more drops of blood?

Frankly, this series is a perfect example of what I hate about the fantasy genre. It was so clear to me that the publisher was just stretching a story that had maybe four books worth of life in it into as many as they possibly could. By the time I reached the last one he had published (and this was last year some time), it was painfully obvious that Goodkind's heart wasn't in it anymore. The plot got thinner, the speeches got longer and more repetitive, and the "main characters" got more and more tangential. It really felt like he was struggling to live up to his contract or something.

Azraelsbane
09-04-2007, 07:24 AM
I think a story should have a set beginning and end. I believe you can go back in time (write histories, maybe of antagonists and such), but not forward.

Otherwise, things get WAY outta hand, and you just end up with a stack of doorstops. Good examples: Terry Goodkind and Robert Jordan.

EriRae
09-05-2007, 03:09 PM
Don't you wish we could turn back time for Terry Goodkind and help him rewrite the Sword of Truth series so that his beautiful blond villain lasts a little longer?

Darken Rahl is the evil emperor of D'hara. He's blond, he's vegetarian, and he's as pretty as he is cruel. He has sex with Mord Sith, the scariest female warriors ever, the way King Joffrey Jofur (James Earl Jones, Coming to America) has sex with his bathers. He also wants to give the world over to the Keeper of the Underworld, and sacrifices children to the Keeper in order to gain subtractive magic.

Richard Cypher has memorized The Book of Counted Shadows, the book Darken needs to open the door to the Underworld. There are no copies of the book but the one in Richard's brain. Darken must keep Richard alive until the proper date/moon phase/hour of the eclipse, but it's okay for the Mord Sith to torture him and use him for their pet.

Wizard's First Rule was one of the best fantasy books I've read. The only thing that takes away from that: DARKEN RAHL DIES AT THE END, but not before Richard's grandfather admits to Richard that Darken was his father and Richard is now the ruler of D'Hara.

Say WHAT? Darken's dead, and Richard is his son. I realize Darken had to die so that the D'Haran's bond transfers to Richard, but why does he have to stay dead? Yes, he makes appearances as an evil spirit, until Richard bans him forever in Temple of the Winds, but it's just not the same.

So who's with me? Anyone want to join the Darken Rahl fanclub? There are no dues, and no real requirements. Just post what you want to say in favor of His Evil Blondness.

Azraelsbane
09-05-2007, 05:08 PM
I want Darken back in any way possible. Although, I would prefer that it happen in some way that causes Richard a gross amount of pain. Maybe ending in his intestines springing forth from his ravaged abdomen as he writhes on the floor in the clutches of death. Yes. That would be most satisfying. I cannot stand that whiny fucker.

That is all.

EriRae
09-06-2007, 01:22 AM
I can't believe we're the only ones...come on, people! Don't fear the Keeper!

Azraelsbane
09-06-2007, 02:00 AM
Don't fear the Keeper!

Wow. If I could, I'd give you a frickin' trophy for that. Brilliant!

:Trophy::Trophy::Trophy:

Because everything is better in 3s...the basic point of everything I've ever written. ;)

David McAfee
09-06-2007, 04:49 AM
Darken Rahl was an interesting villain, I will grant you that.

But I loathe Jagang far, far more than Darken Rahl.

EriRae
09-06-2007, 05:22 AM
Jagang bores me. He's not pretty. His accent is horrible, not to mention stereotypical. And he uses people with magic because he has no magic of his own. Parasite.

David McAfee
09-07-2007, 09:06 PM
Personally, I don't care if a villain is pretty, but that's just personal preference.

Jagang is scarier to me BECAUSE he is able to manipulate others so easliy.

EriRae
09-07-2007, 09:13 PM
;) To each his own...I like sexy villains meself...Lucius Malfoy (Jason Isaacs--YUM).

That's what's so great about Goodkind--there are so many characters; we can all relate to someone. You're right, Jagang can manipulate so many people, but there's also a simple counter to his charms: the D'Haran spell/chant.

David McAfee
09-07-2007, 11:18 PM
True enough. I think what really bothers me about Jagang is the way he and the Imperial Order treat women.

UGH!

I'm still a big fan of the series. :)

Azraelsbane
09-07-2007, 11:20 PM
True enough. I think what really bothers me about Jagang is the way he and the Imperial Order treat women.

UGH!

I'm still a big fan of the series. :)

My antagonist REALLY hates women. He tries to hate everyone equally, but fails. LoL.

EriRae
09-07-2007, 11:24 PM
I can't wait for Nicci to have her revenge for all the nasty things Jagang did to her. (Unless she dies in Phantom? I haven't bought it yet...just finished Chainfire.)

David McAfee
09-08-2007, 12:36 AM
I can't wait for Nicci to have her revenge for all the nasty things Jagang did to her. (Unless she dies in Phantom? I haven't bought it yet...just finished Chainfire.)


...because Nicci is such a wholesome and sweet Sister of the Dark. ;)

Ok, ok, she's not one anymore...but she used to be, and she did lots of horrible things to other people.

pconsidine
09-08-2007, 12:47 AM
Truth be told, I'm amazed that this series has as many fans as it does.

I can see why the Darken Rahl (wtf is with that name?) dies at the end of the first one. It's the principle rule of movies - the first one has to be as complete as possible, in case there isn't a second one.

But I completely agree with the assessment of Richard as a whiny git. I don't think I've ever heard so much bitching from a superhuman since Interview with a Vampire. If I didn't know better, I'd say that Goodkind has secretly been writing a Libertarian manifesto, disguised as a magical fantasy series.

Either that, or he's is secretly dclary.

EriRae
09-08-2007, 01:03 AM
...because Nicci is such a wholesome and sweet Sister of the Dark. ;)

Ok, ok, she's not one anymore...but she used to be, and she did lots of horrible things to other people.

You know she's going to bring the wrath of all the positive and subtractive magic in the whole world down on him. Because she can.

EriRae
09-08-2007, 01:06 AM
Truth be told, I'm amazed that this series has as many fans as it does.

I can see why the Darken Rahl (wtf is with that name?) dies at the end of the first one. It's the principle rule of movies - the first one has to be as complete as possible, in case there isn't a second one.

But I completely agree with the assessment of Richard as a whiny git. I don't think I've ever heard so much bitching from a superhuman since Interview with a Vampire. If I didn't know better, I'd say that Goodkind has secretly been writing a Libertarian manifesto, disguised as a magical fantasy series.

Either that, or he's is secretly dclary.

Is that why dclary said he was my new best friend? LOL--it did correspond with starting this post; I just thought it had more to do with the crazy amount of reps I was giving in the novels forum.

I'm 2 books away from the end of the series, and Richard still doesn't know how to use his magic. Maybe Goodkind doesn't want any further similarities between his series and Robert Jordan's? At least Rand Al'Thor knows what he's doing, as Skywalker-like as he is.

J. R. Tomlin
09-08-2007, 01:08 AM
Nah, I thought Rahl was a bit dim, frankly, and pretty stereotyped.

And as far as the Mord Sith, they aren't really warriors since they aren't actually trained with weapons just those silly magic pain sticks they use. Not to mention I'm don't find S/M in a book very appealing. Blech.

Sorry. I have read a couple of Goodkind's books purely as education--I like to see what's selling in the genre I write in.

Has there ever been a blade of grass that Goodkind didn't want to describe. I'd love for someone to actually explain the appeal of these books to me. I'm open to learning.


To each his own...I like sexy villains meself...Lucius Malfoy (Jason Isaacs--YUM).



That's what's so great about Goodkind--there are so many characters; we can all relate to someone. You're right, Jagang can manipulate so many people, but there's also a simple counter to his charms: the D'Haran spell/chant.

Nope, not a one I relate to. Which one do you actually relate to? I find all of his characters totally cardboard cutouts. And his women--yes, they are ill-treated by what's his name--but they are so boring.

Goodkind is really turned on by the S/M thing though, it seems like. I think that's why he so completely loses me. And that chant thing where people go on for hours about how they live for Richard. Yikes. Now that is even more disgusting than the S/M. *shakes head*

Ok, I don't like them. I'll leave now. Sorry. :)

III
09-08-2007, 01:11 AM
Jagang is gonna grab Erin's boobie and squeeze it hard! That's what Jagang does best.

EriRae
09-08-2007, 01:16 AM
Jagang is gonna grab Erin's boobie and squeeze it hard! That's what Jagang does best.

LOL!!! Not much there to grab ;)

Agreed, that is what he does best, even when he's not THERE...he made bruises stand out on Nicci when he was in her dreams. I've been throwing this around alot lately, but it's kinda like The Matrix. What happens in the dream happens in real life.

pconsidine
09-08-2007, 05:28 AM
I think that's what bothered be most about the series (and, as far as I know, I've read them all) – he traded a truly great villain (Darken) for a lumbering dumbass of a villain (Jagang). One of the first things I learned about storytelling is that the villain has to be equal to the hero. Jagang, while he's powerful and all, is definitely not Richard's equal. The best villains are signposts for what the hero could become if he doesn't make the right choices. If Goodkind wants us to believe that Richard could become Jagang, then he really needs to structure his story to make that an actual possibility, e.g., less speechifying from Richard and less idiocy from Jagang.

EriRae
09-08-2007, 11:25 PM
Very good point, pconsidine. At this point, the Sisters of the Dark are more formidable than Jagang. (Remember, I haven't read Phantom, so that may no longer be the case--I've got to get that book!) Jagang wasn't even in Chainfire, a figurehead, not a character.

dclary
09-09-2007, 12:20 AM
I'm not saying anything here, but I think you may see Darken again someday.

Have faith. All good (and evil) things have their day.

pconsidine
09-09-2007, 03:09 AM
I was at the library today and I noticed sitting on the shelf, so being the compulsive "have to know how it ends" guy that I am, I picked it up and started reading. Based on what I've read so far, I'm revising my opinion slightly. I now think that rather than trying to write a Libertarian manifesto, he's actually channeling Ayn Rand's objectivism. Richard really seems to take on the aura of Howard Roark from Atlas Shrugged(?) at times.

Not that that's better or worse than anything else. Just something I noticed.

Dave.C.Robinson
09-11-2007, 06:17 PM
I'm another who dropped Goodkind because he was getting RJS (Robert Jordan Syndrome). Having said that, I think a lot of writers jump the shark when they go into the prequel series mode. It's one of the fastest ways to lose me as a reader.

As an example, I read Anne McCaffrey's first three Pern books when I was in high school, and remember reading the end of the White Dragon where they find the evidence of their origins. I wanted to know what happened next. She went back and wrote prequels. It drove me nuts. One problem I have is that is that so many such prequels are about snatching survival from the jaws of extinction, and that gets boring after a very short while. Katherine Kurtz did the same thing, going back in time when I wanted to know what happened next.

It turned me completely off Kurtz, I stopped reading any Deryni books because of it. Anne McCaffrey suffered the same fate. It took her about fifteen years to write the only book I wanted to read, and by then I'd lost interest.

I personally think the best option is to write a series, FINISH IT, and then move on to a sequel series that covers a new problem-- not to go backwards.

Goodkind and Jordan's problem is not that they keep going forwards. It's that they don't finish their stories. Finish the story and move on to the next one.

EriRae
09-12-2007, 10:41 AM
Hmm...I've steered clear of Ayn Rand so far...might have to pick up Atlas Shrugged now. Especially since Zoombie keeps talking about it over in novels.

pconsidine
09-12-2007, 06:32 PM
I have a couple of friends who are big Rand fans, but she never really did much for me. Something I wish I knew before I read 800+ pages of her. I think she had Herman Wouk envy or something.

Azraelsbane
09-12-2007, 06:51 PM
The Fountainhead bored me to tears. I never picked up another of Rand's books. Now it wasn't as bad as Woolf... God how I hate Woolf.

Okay, I'm going to end this post before I go into a crazed diatribe against Woolf and Hemingway.

Pila
09-17-2007, 04:10 AM
There is so much WRONG this the Sword of Truth series but I am SO FREAKING EXCITED FOR CONFESSOR :D

Pila
09-17-2007, 04:14 AM
Well, isn't Robert Jordan's series still going?

The Sword of Truth series ends on the 30th ;) And I'm pretty excited. I hope it ends realy well.

The first few books were AMAZING, the middle books were repetative and stupid, and Chainfire and Phantom were a bit better.

Confessor better be fantastic. I've invested way to much into this series, I can't handle another Harry-Potter-Epilogue-Disaster. I'll probably explode from anger.

JBI
09-18-2007, 01:36 AM
He's a misogynistic opportunistic Ayn Rand with a sword. My brothers loved his work (and I read a few when I was 8-11) but after my brother wrote him a letter (to which he replied) I lost all respect, seeing as how he tried to fuel even more repetition into his letter, and upon my brother asking some questions about his work, told him to go out buy, and read his books again. Oh, and did I mention he stuck some advertisements inside the envelope (my brother was commenting on the 10th or something book).

The comments he made describing himself as "a Novelist" instead of a fantasy author because he feels the genre is beneath him just make me sick. I feel as if he took fame to his head, and just sits there regurgitating Rand's crummy fiction to make a buck.

That of course is disregarding his treatment of women in his novels. I won't even begin on that.

Pila
09-18-2007, 01:53 AM
He's a misogynistic opportunistic Ayn Rand with a sword. My brothers loved his work (and I read a few when I was 8-11) but after my brother wrote him a letter (to which he replied) I lost all respect, seeing as how he tried to fuel even more repetition into his letter, and upon my brother asking some questions about his work, told him to go out buy, and read his books again. Oh, and did I mention he stuck some advertisements inside the envelope (my brother was commenting on the 10th or something book).

The comments he made describing himself as "a Novelist" instead of a fantasy author because he feels the genre is beneath him just make me sick. I feel as if he took fame to his head, and just sits there regurgitating Rand's crummy fiction to make a buck.

That of course is disregarding his treatment of women in his novels. I won't even begin on that.


Mmhmm. I read some of the stuff he has up on his website and he's SO pretentious. He treats his fans like stupid children when they ask him a question, tells them to go back and read the books again and such. Once somebody questioned him about subtractive magic and whatnot and he was basically like 'magic doesn't exist, fools!' Then he said that his books AREN'T fantasy, they're just a way for him to spread his philosophy, or whatever. It's pretty stupid and it makes me angry how one persons ego can be THAT inflated.

Still can't stop reading the books, though =\

Marian Perera
09-18-2007, 03:37 AM
I like The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged, but reading Wizard's First Rule resulted in a very snarky review of it. I'm thinking of writing one for Stone of Tears as well, because I was amazed at the amount of rape in that novel. Though that wasn't half as bizarre as the scene where Kahlan and a bunch of guys paint themselves white and scare an enemy army into thinking they're ghosts.

pconsidine
09-18-2007, 04:25 PM
Then he said that his books AREN'T fantasy, they're just a way for him to spread his philosophy, or whatever. Well that explains everything now. If there's one thing I've known for a while, it's that books written with an agenda pretty much always suck. That's probably why nothing of Rand's work spoke to me either - she was very much about her philosophical agenda.

Ugh. Why can't people just tell stories anymore?

arodriguez
11-22-2007, 03:45 PM
has anyone else read that book, yet.

arodriguez
11-23-2007, 11:05 PM
must be a popular series..lmao

not-your-pixie
12-08-2007, 01:28 AM
I havent read it yet, but am going to soon! I have been waiting all year for it!

valerie_parker
12-09-2007, 05:52 PM
I'm waiting to buy it in paperback.

PrincessKitten
07-22-2009, 09:01 AM
Just wondering if anyone has seen the Publisher's Weekly review of Terry Goodkind's new book. Nothing's really given away besides the basic blurb you'd find on the back of the book, but I feel like the synopsis includes spoilers. It might be my own shock at seeing his new thriller turn into...a sequel?


"Bestseller Goodkind (Confessor) ventures into thriller territory with results sure to please fans of his fantasy fiction. In the opening pages, Alex Rahl, the book’s unwitting hero, saves the beautiful Jax from being run down on the street in Orden, Neb., by a plumbing truck flying a pirate flag. Jax, who turns out to be from an alternate reality where evildoers are attempting to seize control of her civilization, has traveled to Nebraska to seek Alex’s help in saving her people. In Jax’s world, magic takes the place of technology, but on earth she’s stripped of her powers and forced to fight armed with only her trusty dagger. The author takes his time setting all this up, but once the story gets rolling, it’s a gripping ride as the bad guys whoosh in between their world, which remains unseen, and ours. Fantasy and thriller readers alike will find themselves swept along to the final confrontation and looking forward to the next installment." (http://www.publishersweekly.com/article/CA6665994.html?q=law+of+nines)

I was curious to see what his new objectivism lecture book would be about, but, after reading the review, I feel like I'm being punked. Anyone else surprised?

dgiharris
07-26-2009, 07:36 PM
Just wondering if anyone has seen the Publisher's Weekly review of Terry Goodkind's new book. Nothing's really given away besides the basic blurb you'd find on the back of the book, but I feel like the synopsis includes spoilers. It might be my own shock at seeing his new thriller turn into...a sequel?

I feel raped and violated by Goodkind for what he did with his sword of truth series.

Book #1 was awesome
Book #2 was great
Book #3 was good (wait a minute, we got something here set up the cow)
Book #4 was decent (Alright we got this cash cow, start milking)
Book #5 was meh (MMMmmm milking my fans tastes good)
Book #6 was meh with a heavy side of blah (Milk milk milk, I should start a factory)
Book #7 was meh meh meh blah blah blah (Need to water this milk down some more, make it last)
Book #8 was dogshit (Utters are dry, time to switch to soy milk)
Book #9 could no longer stomach it...

So because of that series, even though I liked his writing and story, I refuse to read any more of his books.

Mel...

CACTUSWENDY
07-26-2009, 08:44 PM
So, I guess dairy farming is not the way to go huh?

I think it is sad that the talent some writers have that they feel sitting on their laurels is okay. Too bad.

LOG
07-28-2009, 09:45 AM
So, I guess dairy farming is not the way to go huh?

I think it is sad that the talent some writers have that they feel sitting on their laurels is okay. Too bad.

J.K. Rowling could totally sit on her laurels for the rest of her life if she wanted to...
Harper Lee...although some believe she's still writing.

drksideofthemoon
08-08-2009, 02:31 AM
I feel raped and violated by Goodkind for what he did with his sword of truth series.

Book #1 was awesome
Book #2 was great
Book #3 was good (wait a minute, we got something here set up the cow)
Book #4 was decent (Alright we got this cash cow, start milking)
Book #5 was meh (MMMmmm milking my fans tastes good)
Book #6 was meh with a heavy side of blah (Milk milk milk, I should start a factory)
Book #7 was meh meh meh blah blah blah (Need to water this milk down some more, make it last)
Book #8 was dogshit (Utters are dry, time to switch to soy milk)
Book #9 could no longer stomach it...

So because of that series, even though I liked his writing and story, I refuse to read any more of his books.

Mel...

I agree totally, I didn't make it past book 6 though...

Vincent
08-08-2009, 02:39 AM
Books 1-4 had me, 5 was meh, 6 never finished.

CACTUSWENDY
08-08-2009, 03:13 AM
JJM .....this article was not talking about her. But if she ever writes any other books I hope they are good. It would be a waste if not.

scarletpeaches
09-24-2011, 05:30 PM
Committing a grave act of threadomancy -- but with a purpose, I promise you!

I started reading Wizard's First Rule yesterday afternoon and am whizzing through it. P.168/764 already.

Am I making the biggest mistake of my life reading this book? Are the pages laced with crack?

I confess, I only started reading it because I saw a few episodes of the TV show at my dad's place and got the hots for Craig Horner.

So, we'll see how this reading project goes...

Ari Meermans
09-24-2011, 07:11 PM
I loved Wizard's First Rule! I still have it. In answer to your questions:

Yes, if you expect the rest of the series to be as good; and,
Gawd, they must be. That volume is too damned addictive for them not to be.

Jess Haines
09-26-2011, 11:54 PM
The first book was fantastic, but the rest of the series just goes progressively downhill. I stopped around book 8 or 9. The WTFery factor and politicking got to be too much for me.