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View Full Version : Can anyone recommend a good book for me to read?



Celia Cyanide
02-10-2007, 01:11 AM
I am giving up on Ghormenghast. I just can't get into it. I'm looking for something else to try.

I like JT Leroy, William S Burroughs, and Jean-Paul Sartre to name a few.

Adagio
02-10-2007, 05:04 AM
I am giving up on Ghormenghast. I just can't get into it. I'm looking for something else to try.

I like JT Leroy, William S Burroughs, and Jean-Paul Sartre to name a few.

Celia, I do have a list with "good books" but you know how it goes: what I loved reading might not click with you. I found well-written books in various genres. If you are into literary, I'd recommend Shirley Hazzard: Transit of Venus and The Great Fire. Again, it's a matter of personal taste. I love books written by the French contemporary author Sylvie Germain (many translated in English).

I loved Thomas Perry's pshychological thriller Nightlife -- very good review in The New York Times. Actually, first I read the review, it stirred my curiosity and I bought the book. I don't regret it. I like John Katzenbach's The Analyst, another psychological thriller I enjoyed ...

Hope it helps.

Inkdaub
02-10-2007, 01:09 PM
The People of Paper by Salvador Plascencia is brilliant.

truelyana
02-10-2007, 05:09 PM
At the moment, I'm reading Jenna's "Make a Real Living as a Freelance Writer: How to Win Top Writing Assignments". I'm enjoying myself. It is definetly, worth a read.

aadams73
02-10-2007, 10:17 PM
I am giving up on Ghormenghast. I just can't get into it. I'm looking for something else to try.

I like JT Leroy, William S Burroughs, and Jean-Paul Sartre to name a few.

WICKED, by Gregory Maguire. I keep recommending that one to anyone who will listen.

pamelajo
02-10-2007, 11:51 PM
Lucky By Ann Sebold. She also wrote the Lovely Bones, but I think Lucky is way better.

wyntermoon
02-11-2007, 04:52 AM
The Hangman's Beautiful Daughter by Sharyn McCrumb. Excellent author and sweet as honey pie in person!

BottomlessCup
02-11-2007, 09:51 AM
The Dogfighter, by Mark Bojanowski.

WriterInChains
02-11-2007, 10:18 AM
The best books I've read in the past few weeks (that I think you'll like too) are Clearcut by Nina Shengold, and Dope by Sara Gran.

Akuma
02-15-2007, 05:05 AM
Lucky By Ann Sebold. She also wrote the Lovely Bones, but I think Lucky is way better.

I hated Lucky--not because it wasn't well-written, but that is was such a horrible situation for the author to have been in. I shuddered when I read it, but I suppose that's the point.


My recommendation?

The War of the Flowers by Tad Williams.

Inkdaub
02-16-2007, 01:26 PM
The Boy Detective Fails by Joe Meno is great.

PattiTheWicked
02-16-2007, 05:29 PM
Neuromancer by William Gibson.

Meerkat
02-16-2007, 05:36 PM
The Singularity is Near, by Ray Kurzweil.

WriterInChains
02-16-2007, 08:10 PM
So, Celia, what're you reading now? :)

Celia Cyanide
03-14-2007, 07:27 PM
Thanks for asking! I am currently reading Hunter S. Thompson's Fear & Loathing In Las Vegas.

I'm having a great time reading it, but it's hard not to compare something like this to William Burroughs, which is probably why I don't read many authors like this. He's just so damn brilliant, and I wish everyone could be as good as he is. I have read a lot by Irvine Welsh, though, and I particularly enjoyed Maribou Stork Nightmares. I have Porn, the sequel to Trainspotting, but I'm nervous to read it! I'm afraid I might not like it! Anybody read it? Trainspotting is one of my favorite books.

I also have Harold's End, which I haven't read. I am very saddened over the "demise" of JT Leroy, and once I read the last book, there will be no more. I'm still looking forward to it, though.

Thank you all for your suggestions. I will keep them in mind.

robeiae
03-14-2007, 11:50 PM
Leviathan by Thomas Hobbes.













What?

Unique
03-20-2007, 02:37 AM
I just came in to see what robeiae would recommend to Celia.

You didn't disappoint, Rob. Just sayin'.

robeiae
03-20-2007, 04:43 PM
You didn't disappoint, Rob. Just sayin'.
*le sigh*

Good read that's seems like fiction, but is not:

http://www.amazon.com/Gods-Chinese-Son-Taiping-Heavenly/dp/0393315568

Penguin Queen
03-20-2007, 07:55 PM
Originally Posted by pamelajo http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/buttons/viewpost.gif (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?p=1116131#post1116131)
Lucky By Ann Sebold. She also wrote the Lovely Bones, but I think Lucky is way better.




I hated Lucky--not because it wasn't well-written, but that is was such a horrible situation for the author to have been in. I shuddered when I read it, but I suppose that's the point.

I thought Lucky was extraordinary. Very very good. Very well-written, very direct and angry.
Best read in small doses. As they say, a testament to the human spirit.

engmajor2005
03-22-2007, 03:58 AM
*ignoring fact that OP is currently reading something*

The Shining by Stephen King
American Gods by Neil Gaiman
Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
Beloved by Toni Morrison
House of Sleep by Jonahtan Coe (I think I might start re-reading that myself)
Tithe or Valiant by Holly Black
or anything in any section of your local book store.

Inkdaub
03-22-2007, 09:40 AM
Hyperion by Dan Simmons

WriterInChains
03-24-2007, 09:21 PM
I have Porn, the sequel to Trainspotting, but I'm nervous to read it! I'm afraid I might not like it! Anybody read it? Trainspotting is one of my favorite books.



I haven't read Porn yet, but when I went to Irvine Welsh's reading for The Bedroom Secrets of the Master Chefs he said it was his favorite of all of his books. Just so you know.

That was one of the coolest readings I've ever been to, btw -- the man's a riot. Even if I hadn't ended up (sort of) sitting next to one of my favorite authors, it'd still be one of my favorite readings ever.

popmuze
03-26-2007, 07:14 AM
Sick and tired of waiting for emails, I've read five books in the last few weeks that I really loved:
Motherless Brooklyn Jonathan Lethem
Chrysanthemum (sp?) Palace Bruce Wagner
Set This House in Order Matt Ruff
Social Blunders Tim Sandlin
Coyote Blue Christopher Moore

Of course, I bought the new Pynchon the minute it came out. But I haven't gotten past page 10.

CBeasy
04-10-2007, 07:01 AM
I was going to suggest Fear and Loathing, but you're way ahead of me on that one. If you haven't already read it, you should check out Salinger's Catcher in the Rye. Also, I am reading Gaimen's American Gods and it's awesome, though I think my knowledge of pantheons of various deities has already ruined some of the book's surprises.

licity-lieu
04-20-2007, 02:36 AM
Minddlesex by jeffery Eugenides. I had a love/hate thing going on here. I know that's not a good endorsement but I do think if you can persist with a book,despite some misgivings, then it has something special. I laughed...I cried.

ccarver30
04-20-2007, 11:20 PM
Twilight
New Moon

both by Stephenie Meyer

RumpleTumbler
04-20-2007, 11:37 PM
The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas.

Penguin Queen
04-24-2007, 11:29 PM
Minddlesex by jeffery Eugenides. I had a love/hate thing going on here. I know that's not a good endorsement but I do think if you can persist with a book,despite some misgivings, then it has something special. I laughed...I cried.

Do you know, I was going to suggest this very book. I read it only because an editor insisted (I'm writing a thing about intersex & hermaphrodites at the mo); and it's totally not what I woudl usually read ... actually, I had alreday started to read it once & got bored about 30 pages in.
So now I persisted because I had to, and I really enjoyed it. I think yes, you have to persist past the slightly unlikely beginning in Smyrna. Once you (they) have arrived in Detroit, you're off, and it's just fabulous. A Great American Novel... with a twist.

licity-lieu
04-25-2007, 02:32 AM
Do you know, I was going to suggest this very book. I read it only because an editor insisted (I'm writing a thing about intersex & hermaphrodites at the mo); and it's totally not what I woudl usually read ... actually, I had alreday started to read it once & got bored about 30 pages in.
So now I persisted because I had to, and I really enjoyed it. I think yes, you have to persist past the slightly unlikely beginning in Smyrna. Once you (they) have arrived in Detroit, you're off, and it's just fabulous. A Great American Novel... with a twist.

Yay:hooray: . I cant stop thinking about Cal. I miss Cal! Im reading Fortress of Solitude by Jonathon Lethem. Sublime. A f....ing awesome read:D

Inkdaub
04-27-2007, 12:50 PM
Shadow of the Wind by Ruiz Zafon.

III
04-27-2007, 10:46 PM
A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole. The protagonist, Ignatius J. Reilly is as enjoyable as Dwight K. Schrute.

"A green hunting cap squeezed the top of the fleshy balloon of a head. The green earflaps, full of large ears and uncut hair and the fine bristles that grew in the ears themselves, stuck out on either side like turn signals indicating two directions at once. Full, pursed lips protruded beneath the bushy black moustache and, at their corners, sank into little folds filled with disapproval and potato chip crumbs."

Penguin Queen
04-28-2007, 01:14 AM
The Long Night of White Chickens, Francisco Goldman.

One of the best titles, ever. Bloody good book, too.


The Long Night of White Chickens is a novel born of two worlds: it is the story of Roger Graetz, raised in a Boston suburb by an aristocratic Guatemalan mother, and his relationship with Flor de Mayo, the beautiful young Guatemalan orphan sent by his grandmother to live with his family as a maid. When, years later in the 1980s, Flor is murdered in Guatemala while running an orphanage, Roger returns to uncover the truth of her death. There he is reunited with Luis Moya, a childhoon friend, and together they venture on a quest and chronicle of Flor's whole life story that will prove to have unexpected, and unforgettable, repercussions.

clresu
04-29-2007, 04:35 AM
Read "Journey to the End of the Night" by Celine. (This is not what the new movie is based on, by the way.) He's credited as the father of black humor, on New Directions. He has a big cult following, died about 50 years ago, actually on the same day that Hemmingway shot himself . . . he falls right in with Burroughs and existenialism, or rather Burroughs falls in with him.

WriterInChains
04-29-2007, 06:11 AM
Drive, by James Sallis.
Picked it up this morning and could only put it down long enough to move into the shade. It's short, only 158 pages, but wow, what an awesome book. Could make a damn fine movie. The man can write; I'll be reading more of his for sure.

Veniar
04-29-2007, 07:34 AM
Invisible Man by Ralph Elison. I read it because my brother said it was a good book after reading it for an English assignment.