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ErylRavenwell
02-06-2007, 06:19 AM
Do you say: ...the likes of Phoebe, or is it, the like of Phoebe?

Sage
02-06-2007, 06:21 AM
If I'm understanding the context, I've only heard "likes."

ErylRavenwell
02-06-2007, 06:29 AM
If I'm understanding the context, I've only heard "likes."

I was pretty sure "like", as a noun, is used mostly in the plural. But there are always exceptions (like: "was subject to coughs, asthma, and the like (like singular)), and you cannot trust what you hear everyday to be correct. Thanks a lot.

Vincent
02-06-2007, 06:39 AM
Well, I've always heard it as 'likes'. If I read 'the like of Phoebe' I'd assume it was a typo.

ErylRavenwell
02-06-2007, 06:45 AM
Well, I've always heard it as 'likes'. If I read 'the like of Phoebe' I'd assume it was a typo.


Ayup. I use google a lot as a statistical tool. "the like of him" returns only 16K (about 5 times less than "the likes of him") and they're mostly from amateur sources. :)

ErylRavenwell
02-06-2007, 06:49 AM
@Beezle and sage.

Would you write "We'll never see his like again" or rather "We'll never see his likes again"?

Jamesaritchie
02-06-2007, 06:55 AM
@Beezle and sage.

Would you write "We'll never see his like again" or rather "We'll never see his likes again"?

"We'll never see his like again."

Sage
02-06-2007, 06:56 AM
I think it's still "likes" (& my roommate seconded it, though she said she's only used it as "the likes of him.")

ETA: According to dictionary.com, it can be either.


the like or likes of, someone or something similar to; the equal of: I've never seen the like of it anywhere.

Jamesaritchie
02-06-2007, 06:56 AM
Ayup. I use google a lot as a statistical tool. "the like of him" returns only 16K (about 5 times less than "the likes of him") and they're mostly from amateur sources. :)

The majority of those who use Google worldwide are either semi-literate, or non-English speakers. As a statistical tool, statistics say you should usually believe the opposite of whatever Google has to say when used in this manner.

ErylRavenwell
02-06-2007, 07:04 AM
I think it's still "likes" (& my roommate seconded it, though she said she's only used it as "the likes of him.")

That what I would have written as well, but "like" is correct. It's from the dictionary, but there's no explanation as when to use "likes" and "like", other than "likes" is used oftener.

Vincent
02-06-2007, 07:05 AM
Yes, "We'll never see his like again."

ErylRavenwell
02-06-2007, 07:06 AM
The majority of those who use Google worldwide are either semi-literate, or non-English speakers. As a statistical tool, statistics say you should usually believe the opposite of whatever Google has to say when used in this manner.


I disagree. The majority is usually in the right (and they dictate the rules). This can be easily confirmed through tests. And I don't use Google blindly; I look for respectable sources for confirmation.

ErylRavenwell
02-06-2007, 07:07 AM
Yes, "We'll never see his like again."

And why?

Vincent
02-06-2007, 07:10 AM
Hell, don't ask me. I'm just telling you what I think sounds 'right'. Listen to Jamesaritchie , he actually knows what he's talking about.

ErylRavenwell
02-06-2007, 07:11 AM
And why, James?

ErylRavenwell
02-06-2007, 07:49 AM
ETA: According to dictionary.com, it can be either.

Ok. I'm checking Merriam-Webster, it says you could use either forms (singular or plural) as well. Great!

- the likes of also the like of

chatty
02-10-2007, 04:43 AM
I think there is a meaning difference:

We'll never see the like of him again
= We'll never see even a single person who equals him. For example: you couldn't find even one person as underhanded and crafty as this guy.

We'll never see the likes of him again
= We'll never see people of his sort again. For example: we'll never see outlaws again (not even ones somewhat less underhanded and crafty as this guy turned out to be).

But maybe I'm making that up.

maestrowork
02-10-2007, 06:17 AM
I believe it's the "likes of him."

"We'll never see his like again."




n.
One similar to or like another. Used with the: was subject to coughs, asthma, and the like.
Informal An equivalent or similar person or thing; an equal or match. Often used in the plural: I've never seen the likes of this before. We'll never see his like again.