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Stew21
02-05-2007, 03:29 AM
Need to know for my WIP.

When you think of Ernest Hemingway you think of....

scarletpeaches
02-05-2007, 03:32 AM
I've never read him and I've never known any (sane) person who has.

scarletpeaches
02-05-2007, 03:33 AM
Actually, come to think of it, the name Hemingway makes me think of Michael Palin and the book/TV series he made about him.

Vincent
02-05-2007, 03:39 AM
What I've read, I've liked.

The Lady
02-05-2007, 03:40 AM
I was forced to read a Hemingway story once in a workshop and then listen while the speaker enthused about the brilliance of the man.

I did not particularly enjoy the story.

I will not be tracking down Hemingway stuff to read.

Azure Skye
02-05-2007, 03:44 AM
I read the Old Man and the Sea in highschool. Um, sorry, but blech!

Mandy-Jane
02-05-2007, 03:45 AM
When I think of Ernest Hemingway, I think of depression and suicide. Didn't he shoot himself or something? I've only read "For Whom the Bell Tolls" and it was dark and scary and not really an enjoyable read for me. From memory, it was full of bombs exploding and people being taken prisoner and other people hiding out. I read it years ago, but it's one book I can say I definitely would not read again.

Siddow
02-05-2007, 03:49 AM
Booze and beaches.

kristie911
02-05-2007, 04:07 AM
I'll be the odd person out. I loved Hemingway's A Farewell to Arms, I've read it a couple of times. I also enjoyed The Old Man and the Sea. I consider them classic "must-reads".

WildScribe
02-05-2007, 04:14 AM
I think of the movie Save the Last Dance.

Thomma Lyn
02-05-2007, 04:17 AM
Guess I'll be the first to say it: I'm crazy about Hemingway (check out my sig ;) ). When I think of Hemingway, I think of For Whom the Bell Tolls, one of my favorite novels. To my mind it's a tale of great courage, and though it's very sad (made me cry and cry at the end), it's ennobling and uplifting. And Pilar is one of my all-time favorite female characters in fiction.

The next thing I think of is Hemingway's excellent Nobel Prize acceptance speech, which contains, IMHO, some of the most poignant and moving statements ever made by a writer on writing, excerpted here:



"For a true writer each book should be a new beginning where he tries again for something that is beyond attainment. He should always try for something that has never been done or that others have tried and failed. Then sometimes, with great luck, he will succeed.
"How simple the writing of literature would be if it were only necessary to write in another way what has been well written. It is because we have had such great writers in the past that a writer is driven far out past where he can go, out to where no one can help him."And the third thing I think of is his skill with short stories. He had the short story down to an art form.

Edited to say: Ha, I'm not the first on this thread to say "I like Hemingway", after all -- Kristie911 posted while I was still getting this post together. :D

Stew21
02-05-2007, 04:20 AM
I was beginning to worry for a moment. Glad to see some fans.

alleycat
02-05-2007, 04:23 AM
I like his short stories better than his novels.

As for Hemingway himself, I have not only his books, but books about him as well as a PBS video. By the way, for you Hemingway fans out there, Ernest Hemingway / A Literary Reference by Robert Trogdon is an interesting book about Hemingway's life and work.

Was there some specific thing about Hemingway that you needed an opinion on, or just some general comments?

Stew21
02-05-2007, 04:27 AM
just in general. i know my own opinions, have read a lot of his work, and about him and his life, mostly I was just going for general perceptions.

Judg
02-05-2007, 06:13 AM
I think of spare prose, machismo, suicide, Cuba. I've read one or two novels, a bunch of short stories and neither hate nor love the man's work.

C.bronco
02-05-2007, 06:16 AM
My best impersonation:
"Outside, it was dark. Inside, it was light. I ate some cheese. She had bad teeth, but poured me a sambuca. We drank, and then fished."
Add gratuitous amounts of sangria, and maybe a train ride, and there it is.
Actually, I like Papa. One day I will go to Key West to see his house.

janetbellinger
02-05-2007, 06:18 AM
a very gifted writer who has set the tone for modern day minimalist writing style

C.bronco
02-05-2007, 06:19 AM
Guess I'll be the first to say it: I'm crazy about Hemingway (check out my sig ;) ). When I think of Hemingway, I think of For Whom the Bell Tolls, one of my favorite novels. To my mind it's a tale of great courage, and though it's very sad (made me cry and cry at the end), it's ennobling and uplifting. And Pilar is one of my all-time favorite female characters in fiction.

The next thing I think of is Hemingway's excellent Nobel Prize acceptance speech, which contains, IMHO, some of the most poignant and moving statements ever made by a writer on writing, excerpted here:




"For a true writer each book should be a new beginning where he tries again for something that is beyond attainment. He should always try for something that has never been done or that others have tried and failed. Then sometimes, with great luck, he will succeed.
"How simple the writing of literature would be if it were only necessary to write in another way what has been well written. It is because we have had such great writers in the past that a writer is driven far out past where he can go, out to where no one can help him."And the third thing I think of is his skill with short stories. He had the short story down to an art form.

Edited to say: Ha, I'm not the first on this thread to say "I like Hemingway", after all -- Kristie911 posted while I was still getting this post together. :D

Excellent song by Metallica. Okay...... Okay.

drachin8
02-05-2007, 06:19 AM
The Old Man and the Sea, one of my favorite books.
Achieving great things with such spare prose.
Completely not getting "Hills Like White Elephants" in high school only to be enchanted by it in my adulthood.


:)

-Michelle

janetbellinger
02-05-2007, 06:28 AM
If it hadn't been for Hemingway, I'd never have wanted to start writing.

Chumplet
02-05-2007, 06:29 AM
While reading For Whom the Bell Tolls, I find myself noticing that he breaks a few rules we've set down for ourselves these days, like passive voice. In spite of that, I'm enjoying the story, and parts of it make me cry.

His style may be minimalist, but I can see clearly the scenes before me.

Southern_girl29
02-05-2007, 09:06 AM
He's definately not my favorite, not even close to it. When I hear Hemingway, I think alcoholism and spare, tight prose.

Adagio
02-05-2007, 10:39 AM
When I think Hemingway, I think his famous "icebeg rule for writing" -- most of the story should be underwater, only the tip of the icebeg should hint at the drama, or something to this effect. I think of the writer, the MC in The Snows of Kilimanjaro who is dying. Hemingway has this character thinks:

“Now he would never write the things that he had saved to write until he knew enough to write them well.”

Isn't it beautiful?

The rest, booze, beach, fish, women, ego, Cuba, suicide -- irrelevant. An imperfect human being on his own imperfect life journey.

Yes, I am a fan of Hemingway as an artist, a master of words.

Adagio

A. Hamilton
02-05-2007, 10:47 AM
When you think of Ernest Hemingway you think of....
... big guns and a big male ego.

i really know little about him, but think those two things first. next, i free associate and start thinking about the importance of being earnest....

aruna
02-05-2007, 11:43 AM
Guess I'll be the first to say it: I'm crazy about Hemingway (check out my sig ;) ). When I think of Hemingway, I think of For Whom the Bell Tolls, one of my favorite novels. To my mind it's a tale of great courage, and though it's very sad (made me cry and cry at the end), it's ennobling and uplifting. And Pilar is one of my all-time favorite female characters in fiction.



ALLELUIA!
I was beginning to think I would have to be the only defender of Hemingway here! For WHom the Bell Tolls is the single best book I have ever read. No other book before or after has ever caused me to actually weep (shed tears, yes, but not weep) after I turned the last page - and the weeping went on for days afterwards. To this day, whenever I see a field of harvested grain in autumn I think of Maria's straw-coloured cropped head. It wrenched me apart. I read it just as I started writing myself and my prayer then was to one day write a book that made readers react just the way I had. That would be the summit of writing for me. A great, gret book. And I agree totally about Pilar. Oh, she is delightful!

The movie (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0035896/)(Ingrid Bergman, Gary Cooper) is also good, but not nearly as moving.

That was the first Hemingway I ever read, and I immediately declared him my favourite writer. I tried reading more boks from him but it was all disappointing, I loathed The Sun Also Rises - probably the WORST book I ever read. Ol Man and the Sea? Blah. Farewell to Arms was only so-so.

aruna
02-05-2007, 11:46 AM
... big guns and a big male ego.

i really know little about him, but think those two things first. next, i free associate and start thinking about the importance of being earnest....

That was what I thought of him before I read FWTBT. And when I read it I was amazed at how such a very male man could write something of such beauty and sensitivity.

greatfish
02-05-2007, 02:34 PM
I think he has his high and low points. I found The Sun Also Rises to be fairly bland, but I think The Old Man and the Sea is amazing. It was one of the first books I really enjoyed. It was assigned reading in one of my high school classes, I picked it up with the intention of skimming through it quickly, but I found myself mesmerized. I read it all in one sitting, there was just something about the language and the setting that really came together for me.

KTC
02-05-2007, 03:05 PM
"When you think of Ernest Hemingway you think of...."

-Paris
-Midnight
-Great whopping swordfish jumping against the threat of death
-smokey dives where beautiful amber in a glass refracts light and fulfills the need for warmth on a cold Paris night.
-literary dykes inviting you in for conversations on art and the artless
-buying wood to heat the tiny room you live in with your tiny wife
-losing faith on the sea and finding it. And finding it.
-death by self inflicted whim.
-beauty. beauty. beauty. In the threshold of the arc de triomphe
-cold. hungry. writing at greasy tables with a drink in hand while your wife is sitting in her cell shivering.
-men who think that being a man is more important than being.

Stew21
02-05-2007, 03:14 PM
thanks everyone.

One of the things that amazes me about him is the ability to describe someone without ever telling you one of their true physical traits.

He met a man that he called "nasty" he said some men show evil like a good horse shows breeding, this guy didn't show evil, but he was nasty. Later after thought of a way to describe him he couldn't get beyond describing his eyes. He said, "he has the eyes of an unsuccessful rapist". The characterization of people and characters i think was amazing.

I think he struggled with balancing the doing of things and the writing of things. He himself was a balancing act between good and evil in a lot of ways. He wrote his characters neither all good or all bad, because he wasn't.

KTC
02-05-2007, 03:16 PM
He was a rogue who knew he was a rogue, Trish. He fought with his personality for an entire lifetime. But he also relished in it...took hold of it and called it mighty.

Stew21
02-05-2007, 03:29 PM
that's one of the things I always found intriguing about him.

Shadow_Ferret
02-05-2007, 06:34 PM
I think of him as "one of those dead old American guys I had to read in high school." His name is locked away in a little dusty room in my mind along with Fitzgerald and Faulkner.

maestrowork
02-05-2007, 06:42 PM
Moody, poignant, insightful, deep, disturbed, brilliant. I like his simple yet complex style.

Lyra Jean
02-05-2007, 06:49 PM
six-toed cats and how he left all his money to them. I don't remember reading any of his work perhaps I should go find some.

Stew21
02-05-2007, 07:06 PM
if you haven't read any of his work or much about him in general, start with A Moveable Feast. It is not necessarily all true, but it is a great insight into his writing style, his writing influences, and a good beginning to understanding his life and lifestyle.

Anthony P. Steerpike
02-05-2007, 07:08 PM
A master of the craft of writing.

maestrowork
02-05-2007, 07:11 PM
I think one of the things I like the most about him is his word choice. He really had a way with words. Just a few choice words would paint a perfect picture of what he was describing. That's a talent.

Shadow_Ferret
02-05-2007, 07:18 PM
I remember reading the short story, "Hills Like White Elephants" and everyone in the class was discussing it and coming to the conclusion that the two folks in the story were talking about an abortion. Me, I didn't see it. They could have been talking about ANY kind of medical procedure, that's how vague it it was. Interesting argument, me against an entire class. So I wrote, Hills Like White Teeth (http://www.writersg.com/short/pahule/teeth.html) as a parody of it to show they could have been talking about ANYthing. :D

maestrowork
02-05-2007, 07:30 PM
We all know White Elephants is about exchanging unwanted gifts.

Shadow_Ferret
02-05-2007, 07:45 PM
So your opinion is its about STDs?

Higgins
02-05-2007, 07:56 PM
That was what I thought of him before I read FWTBT. And when I read it I was amazed at how such a very male man could write something of such beauty and sensitivity.

I thought Hemingway wrote the Importance of Being Ernest. Not really all that sensitive of a play. What exactly does "Bunburying" mean anyway?

"Not even for ready money?"

"Not ready for Even money?"

The Mr Ed episode where Wilbur gets hit on the head and thinks he is
Hemingway is kind of funny. "Wake up Wilbur...Wilbur...Ernest...Ernie...Papa...Him...Hy mn....Hemingway..."
Kind of hypnotic or the reverse of hypnotic. Like the Taming of the Shrew or Mrs. Windemer's Fan.
But with a horse. Of course. Wake up!

The Lady
02-05-2007, 08:01 PM
I remember reading the short story, "Hills Like White Elephants" and everyone in the class was discussing it and coming to the conclusion that the two folks in the story were talking about an abortion. Me, I didn't see it. They could have been talking about ANY kind of medical procedure, that's how vague it it was. Interesting argument, me against an entire class. So I wrote, Hills Like White Teeth (http://www.writersg.com/short/pahule/teeth.html) as a parody of it to show they could have been talking about ANYthing. :D


I was absolutely convinced he was trying to persuade her to have a lobotomy so much of a deal was being made about it.

britwrit
02-05-2007, 08:36 PM
That was a wonderful book but it also illustrates a lot I dislike about Hemingway the man. He'll go on for pages, writing beautifully about writing in cafes, or Paris in the Autumn, or eating oysters, and then he'll throw in a gratuitous cheap shot at someone he's fallen out. You know - Sherwood Anderson is a bore. F. Scott Fitzgerald was probably gay. Etc. etc.

He's one of my favorite writers but in real life, just from reading about him, he comes across as a pompous egomaniac.

Thomma Lyn
02-05-2007, 09:42 PM
six-toed cats and how he left all his money to them.

Now I can relate to that (though none of my kitties have six toes)... ;)

Jamesaritchie
02-05-2007, 09:50 PM
I've never read him and I've never known any (sane) person who has.

If you've never read Hemingway, it's really weird to say you don't know any sane person who has. If you haven't read his work, you don't know a darned thing about it.

Jamesaritchie
02-05-2007, 09:53 PM
Hemingway is one of the best short story writers who ever lived, and an absolute master of the English language. His novels are very good, but most of his short stories are simply wonderful. Especially the Nick Carter stories.

And The Old Man and the Sea in a classic under any definition. It just doesn't get any better than that.

Those who judge the writing by who the writer was, or by what kind of person the writer was, just aren't very bright.

rugcat
02-05-2007, 10:02 PM
His name is locked away in a little dusty room in my mind along with Fitzgerald and Faulkner.I'm not sure a locked mind is the best attribute for a writer.

jodiodi
02-05-2007, 10:49 PM
I've read Hemingway because I was forced to do so in order to get English degrees. I don't care for his style and his topics do not interest me. I know nothing much about the man himself so I can't judge him on the kind of person he was. I'm sure people judged to be far wiser than me will think I'm one of the great unwashed, but meh.

So, to get back to the original question ...

When I hear the name Hemingway, I just flinch.

Shadow_Ferret
02-05-2007, 10:59 PM
I'm not sure a locked mind is the best attribute for a writer.
Who said my mind was locked. Just that particular closet is locked.

Well, and the one that contains the really scary stuff that haunts your darkest nightmares and gives you that feeling that a clawed hand is reaching out for the back of your neck as you're walking up from the basement. That door is locked, too.

Oh, and I accidently broke the key in the lock to the room that contains all the collected hits of Bread.

Personally, I think you need to put a lock on the door that lets you pass judgement upon people you don't know.

greatfish
02-05-2007, 11:06 PM
I thought Hemingway wrote the Importance of Being Ernest. Not really all that sensitive of a play. What exactly does "Bunburying" mean anyway?

In the play, the characters define it as the act of fabricating a person who's always in a dilemma so you have an excuse for getting out of town every once in a while. Algenon's imaginary friend is named Bunbury, hence the name "bunburying".

However, Oscar Wilde was a known homosexual, and bun burying isn't that subtle. I think it was his little inside joke so he could talk about how Bunburying is the solution for a distressing married life.

Higgins
02-05-2007, 11:32 PM
In the play, the characters define it as the act of fabricating a person who's always in a dilemma so you have an excuse for getting out of town every once in a while. Algenon's imaginary friend is named Bunbury, hence the name "bunburying".

However, Oscar Wilde was a known homosexual, and bun burying isn't that subtle. I think it was his little inside joke so he could talk about how Bunburying is the solution for a distressing married life.

So Oscar Wilde wrote the Importance of Being Ernest? It seemed like a much more mysterious play when I assumed it was a very early work by Hemingway.

Speaking of Bunburying...I thought that Algee himself was Bunbury and had an imaginary Aunt that was ill and lived in the country...maybe that's how Hemingway would have done it.

I haven't read the Old Man and the Sea, but I naturally assumed that it was about some sort of extended Bunburying expedition, perhaps not involving the subplots of man against nature, nature against aunt in the country, aunt against man, man against aunt, nature against industry, science against simple quasi-allegorical categories, nature against plot, man against shrubbery...but something more simple and primoridal, like Bunburying...which is just a rather specific (if vague and even euphemistic) verb and so much more primoridal than anything involving entire phrases. In fact one suspects that originally the Old Man and the Sea was in fact just going to be called Bunburying.

Higgins
02-05-2007, 11:36 PM
When I hear the name Hemingway, I just flinch.

Now there is wisdom, distilled, Zen-like, to its bodily essence.

I still can't manage a simple Hemingway flinch. I do more of a yoga-flow of barely remembered agony: an eye-roll, a sigh, a shrug, a wry smile, another sigh, a guilty twisting of the spine.

Sassenach
02-06-2007, 12:06 AM
Hemingway is one of the best short story writers who ever lived, and an absolute master of the English language. His novels are very good, but most of his short stories are simply wonderful. Especially the Nick Carter stories.

And The Old Man and the Sea in a classic under any definition. It just doesn't get any better than that.

Those who judge the writing by who the writer was, or by what kind of person the writer was, just aren't very bright.

One of the rare times I agree 100% with James.

rugcat
02-06-2007, 12:06 AM
Personally, I think you need to put a lock on the door that lets you pass judgement upon people you don't know.Judgemental? Moi?


But...
I think of him as "one of those dead old American guys I had to read in high school." His name is locked away in a little dusty room in my mind along with Fitzgerald and Faulkner.

When you offhandedly dismiss three iconic American writers, (though each very different) as "dead old American guys" and relegate them to a dusty room in your mind, implying that they are unworthy even of consideration, it does seem to indicate a certain degree of close-mindedness in literary matters.

And the term "pass judgment" is one of those loaded pejorative terms which implies that a person who disagrees with your opinions is somehow morally lacking, a person who sets him or herself above others. I simply have strong opinions and often express them; I see little point in limiting posts to nothing but supportive agreement. We all "pass judgment" on others, and their opinions, every day, whether we admit it to ourselves or not.

That said, I admit my original reply was a snarky dig, and for that I do apologize.

Sassenach
02-06-2007, 12:08 AM
I thought Hemingway wrote the Importance of Being Ernest. Not really all that sensitive of a play. What exactly does "Bunburying" mean anyway?



On first reading I thought this was a dumb joke.

Now, I realize it's merely dumb.

MidnightMuse
02-06-2007, 12:10 AM
When I hear the name Hemingway I think of The Old Man and the Sea, polydactile cats, and whisky.

Lots and lots of whisky.

Shadow_Ferret
02-06-2007, 12:15 AM
When you offhandedly dismiss three iconic American writers, (though each very different) as "dead old American guys" and relegate them to a dusty room in your mind, implying that they are unworthy even of consideration, it does seem to indicate a certain degree of close-mindedness in literary matters.


My comments were merely for amusement purposes, not to be taken seriously. Nothing was implied except for what you brought to the party. :)

ChunkyC
02-06-2007, 12:18 AM
To answer the original post, when I hear Hemmingway's name, the first thing I think of is arrogant macho posturing, a facet of humanity I quite despise. Of course, that has no bearing on his skill as a writer.

Stew21
02-06-2007, 12:26 AM
I had no idea he would stir such a passionate discussion.
that's a good thing.

Higgins
02-06-2007, 01:06 AM
On first reading I thought this was a dumb joke.

Now, I realize it's merely dumb.

I would never talk about several of our great writers that way. The more I think about it, the more I realize that Oscar Hemingway probably meant the Old Man and the Sea to be how it would feel to be an imaginary aunt in the country who was somebody else's excuse for not being in town.

It's all there: the inhuman drama of it all, all stripped down to its bare essentials: just an aunt who is not there at all in a play no one has ever written. Perhaps its just as well that Hemingway never wrote it.

Lyra Jean
02-06-2007, 06:13 AM
I thought the Old Man and the Sea was about some old cuban guy going in his rowboat to catch a huge fish.

Ya know I think I read that in High School.

Mud Dauber
02-06-2007, 06:27 AM
I think of reading The Old Man and the Sea in high school and liking it.

I also think of touring his Key West house, marveling at the six-toed kitties (they were so cute). But more importantly, I remember seeing the room where they said he did his writing. Of course, it was all roped off and everything, but just to be standing in the same place where his muse must've visited him many times was... well... kinda cool.

blacbird
02-06-2007, 10:58 AM
When I hear Hemingway, I think alcoholism and spare, tight prose.

As opposed to when you think about Faulkner, you think alcoholism and convoluted, prolix prose.

There's a reason Hemingway is regarded so highly, people. I can accept that he's not exactly everyone's cup o' meat, much the same way Jane Austen isn't mine, but I'm not about to call her a lousy writer based on my temperamental preference. Hemingway was, overall, uneven and ultimately suffered from the limitation of trying to live up to the reputation of being Ernest Hemingway. But at his best (and For Whom the Bell Tolls is it) he created work for the ages.

And nobody can deny that he was a powerful influence on the fiction writing of the past century and onward.

caw

Tiger
02-06-2007, 11:47 AM
I think of conciseness. I don't believe I've ever read anyone who put so much into imagery into so few words. I read Hemingway and I get the urge to trim fat off of my prose...

Or, "When I read Hemingway, I'm inspired to write concisely. He was a master" for short. :)

maestrowork
02-06-2007, 07:02 PM
Or "Maestro Hemingway inspired me to write concisely." ;)

Silver King
02-07-2007, 03:48 AM
One of the rare times I agree 100% with James.
I was in full agreement as well but had to change mine to 99.99% when I came across this:


His novels are very good, but most of his short stories are simply wonderful. Especially the Nick Carter stories.

Tiger
02-07-2007, 04:43 AM
Or "Maestro Hemingway inspired me to write concisely." ;)

Hemingway: concise

aruna
02-07-2007, 09:06 AM
To answer the OP:
Hemingway = Wild game hunting. Deep sea fishing. Cuba. Drink. Guns. Bullfighting. Machismo. Women. Africa. Spanish Civil War. Paris. For Whom the Bell Tolls. Robert Jordan. Maria. Pilar. Bombs. Bridges. The Earth moving. Fields of grain stubble.

maestrowork
02-07-2007, 08:09 PM
To the OP: Are we talking about Hemingway the man or Hemingway the writer?

Hemingway the man = alcoholic, suicidal, depressed but gifted