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Jeni
01-24-2007, 09:28 PM
Googling this didn't provide much information, so I'm hoping to find a few suggestions and/or advice here.

What is the likelihood of a person surviving and walking away from a one-story fall/slide out of a window? Meaning, they're trying to get out of a sticky situation and after prying a window open, manage to get themselves through the window but the only way they can go from there is down. Head first.

I wouldn't call it an uncontrolled or steep fall, and while there's not really going to be much of anything to cushion the fall (it's a straight drop down), is it entirely unrealistic to assume that the most they'll be hurt is a few scrapes and bruises?

At most, I think the fall in question is a little over six feet.

alleycat
01-24-2007, 09:32 PM
Well, if they went down head first, they might break an arm trying to cushion the fall; other than that, they would probably walk away mostly unharmed, especially if they landed on ground rather than pavement.

jennifer75
01-24-2007, 09:34 PM
What is the likelihood of a person surviving and walking away from a one-story fall/slide out of a window? Meaning, they're trying to get out of a sticky situation and after prying a window open, manage to get themselves through the window but the only way they can go from there is down. Head first.

At most, I think the fall in question is a little over six feet.

I knew somebody that tried taking their life by jumping from a freeway overpass. So, I'm guessing about 20 feet? Maybe a little higher? He survived. Broke LOTS of bones and was stuck in bed for a couple months, but he survived. Then he went off to the assylum. Turned out that "the voices" told him to do it.

Tish Davidson
01-24-2007, 09:51 PM
My friend's young son fell out of a second story window when the window screen gave way. No damage to the kid except bruises, but the mom was an emotional wreck.

MidnightMuse
01-24-2007, 09:55 PM
I tried with no luck to find the news article, but last summer a young boy fell out of a second-story window and amazingly had no injuries. And just a week ago a grown man fell 7 stories and lived to tell about it. He broke through a lot of things on the way down, and did a lot of damage to himself, but somehow lived.

So a one-story fall should be easy if the person lands properly.

alleycat
01-24-2007, 09:59 PM
My brother, uh, accidentally fell backward through a storm door and onto the back concrete terrace . . . with no injury. Well, no injuries to him at least; me, I was out of breath when he caught me.

MidnightMuse
01-24-2007, 10:01 PM
accidentally?

Marlys
01-24-2007, 10:02 PM
You could make it even easier by putting a convenient shrub beneath the window to break his fall, or even having him land in a flower bed (where the dirt is nice and loose, and might have a few inches of cushioning mulch).

Jeni
01-24-2007, 10:04 PM
Wow, thank you for all the quick replies. Would the same apply even if the landing was on pavement? The only way I can picture the landing of this fall is that the hands take the first initial brunt then likely the chin connects next or possibly even the knees.

MidnightMuse
01-24-2007, 10:08 PM
Well, if they're heading down head first and have some wits about them, the land-and-roll will save a lot of hurt, avoid neck-snapping, and land them on their feet ready to run (assuming those wits are properly and appropriately about them, you understand.)

Most of us would konk our heads, break both arms and cry like babies.

alleycat
01-24-2007, 10:09 PM
Wow, thank you for all the quick replies. Would the same apply even if the landing was on pavement? The only way I can picture the landing of this fall is that the hands take the first initial brunt then likely the chin connects next or possibly even the knees.
He might have a sprained wrist in that case. And some broken skin here and there.

Marlys
01-24-2007, 10:09 PM
Hands, then tuck and roll into a somersault should work, even on pavement. Best if there's not much momentum--say, if he manages to catch his feet on the window sill for even a second so that he's dangling upside down, then lets go. Then there's only a few feet from his outstretched hands to the ground, and he can plan the tuck and roll.

ETA: Cross-posted with MidnightMuse.

Jeni
01-24-2007, 10:11 PM
Ok great. I have plenty of ideas now, thank you all. :) I'm going to run with the tuck and roll option and hope for the best. :)

K1P1
01-24-2007, 10:50 PM
I have an injury prone daughter (she takes dares and likes excitement). As a child she fell backwards off of the railing of a neighbor's porch 10+ feet off the ground, onto dirt. It knocked the wind out of her and she bit her tongue which bled for a while. No other injuries.

But, don't use a shrub to cushion a person's fall. The time she jumped off the porch roof (maybe 8 ft high) into a boxwood, she got a major cut along her shin - cut all the way through to the muscle sheath, about 4-5" long, and required 9 sutures to close it up.

stormie
01-24-2007, 11:02 PM
Oh, yeah, shrubbery can be lethal. Poke out an eye, cut through skin.... If a person fell out of a window, head first, onto concrete, and the fall was from a first floor window, my guess is their hands would hit first, a common reaction to breaking a fall. I'd say broken or very badly bruised wrists and/or hands. There is an ER doctor who posts on these boards. You might want to check out the forum about specialities. I think his user name is ColoradoGuy, not sure.