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robeiae
01-16-2007, 09:04 PM
One of my favorite subjects within the general fields of this forum is the philosophy of Martin Heidegger. Especially with regard to his support of National Socialism.

As far as deconstructionist theory goes, I enjoyed this book immensely:

Historical Destiny and National Socialism in Heidegger's "Being and Time" (http://www.amazon.com/Historical-Destiny-National-Socialism-Heideggers/dp/0520210026)

I think Fritsche is flat-out wrong in a number of ways, but it's a great read and very well researched, imo.

sunandshadow
01-16-2007, 10:54 PM
I assume others are invited to recommend books too? If so, I would suggest

Simon O. Lesser's Fiction and the Unconscious (http://www.amazon.com/Fiction-Unconscious-Simon-O-Lesser/dp/0226473317/sr=1-1/qid=1168973708/ref=sr_1_1/002-1126361-0815230?ie=UTF8&s=books)

as an excellent book to introduce someone to the idea that fiction carries out social and psychological functions.

ColoradoGuy
01-17-2007, 12:17 AM
I assume others are invited to recommend books too? If so, I would suggest

Simon O. Lesser's Fiction and the Unconscious (http://www.amazon.com/Fiction-Unconscious-Simon-O-Lesser/dp/0226473317/sr=1-1/qid=1168973708/ref=sr_1_1/002-1126361-0815230?ie=UTF8&s=books)

as an excellent book to introduce someone to the idea that fiction carries out social and psychological functions.
Sure, by all means. If we round up enough folks interested in any one book we could do a roundtable about it as a separate thread, either in the Book Club forum or in here. I don't think anyone posting in the more general Book Club forum would be interested in a specialized book like that, but it would depend on the book. If there's interest, I'll poll the other mods about the issue.

robeiae
01-17-2007, 01:18 AM
Yes, this thread was intended to be for everyone to post book recommendations. Maybe you could sticky it, CG.

ColoradoGuy
01-17-2007, 02:34 AM
Done.

Medievalist
01-17-2007, 02:47 AM
For a short, readable and not too jargon-laden introduction to literary /critical theory:

Eagleton, Terry. Literary Theory: An Introduction (https://www.amazon.com/Literary-Theory-Introduction-Terry-Eagleton/dp/0816654476/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&qid=1530388475&sr=8-1&keywords=Eagleton+Literary+Theory+an+introduction&linkCode=ll1&tag=absowrit-20&linkId=880c3267875a6c9469820f779ad6450b). University of Minnesota Press; 2nd edition (November 1996). *



* AW Amazon Affiliate Link

robeiae
01-25-2007, 07:12 PM
Okay, I've just started reading this book, and though it's not specific to the topics here, I think much will be applicable:

The Blank Slate: The Modern Denial of Human Nature (http://www.amazon.com/Blank-Slate-Modern-Denial-Nature/dp/0670031518)

Any book that quotes Hobbes before the tenth page must have something going for it...

Did anyone else read it?

Higgins
01-25-2007, 07:18 PM
And don't believe the Uchicago site blurbage for the first one: there is a lot of POMO
concerns that have been a big help in the History of Science.


Here's my bibliographic notes from another thread:

(see for example:

http://www.press.uchicago.edu/cgi-bi...i/00/15864.ctl (http://www.press.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/hfs.cgi/00/15864.ctl)

and such things as:

http://www.press.uchicago.edu/cgi-bi...cgi/00/757.ctl (http://www.press.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/hfs.cgi/00/757.ctl)

http://www.press.uchicago.edu/cgi-bi...i/00/13281.ctl (http://www.press.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/hfs.cgi/00/13281.ctl)

And this (all about reading and secret identities):

http://www.press.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/hfs.cgi/00/14098.ctl (http://www.press.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/hfs.cgi/00/14098.ctl)
)

robeiae
01-25-2007, 07:23 PM
The last link is broken, Sokal.

ETA: Okay, now at least give me the title of your "Favorite book of all time." I must know!

Higgins
01-25-2007, 07:51 PM
The last link is broken, Sokal.

ETA: Okay, now at least give me the title of your "Favorite book of all time." I must know!


http://www.press.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/hfs.cgi/00/2071.ctl

cooltouch
06-17-2007, 11:42 PM
Okay, I've just started reading this book, and though it's not specific to the topics here, I think much will be applicable:

The Blank Slate: The Modern Denial of Human Nature (http://www.amazon.com/Blank-Slate-Modern-Denial-Nature/dp/0670031518)

Any book that quotes Hobbes before the tenth page must have something going for it...

Did anyone else read it?

Thanks for the link. I was unaware of Pinker's latest. I've read both The Language Instinct and How the Mind Works. My linguistics specialty is quite a bit different than most -- the biolgical origins of language and the evolution of language in humans, and because of this, Pinker was an early influence in my research. We even corresponded briefly as I was doing some of my graduate research.

I disagree with Pinker on a few things -- for one, I'm not a Chomskyite, and he is. But for the most part, I find myself in agreement with what he has to say.

Reading through the publisher's blurb and some of the comments regarding the above work, to me what he is expressing is just basic common sense. Way too many people believe that, for some strange reason, humans do not have instincts. This attitude amazes me. For example, the only way language acquisition makes any sense at all is if it is treated as instintive behavior.

Best,

Michael

cooltouch
06-17-2007, 11:52 PM
I am currently reading Harry G. Frankfurt's On Bullshit, published by Princeton University Press.
http://www.amazon.com/Bullshit-Harry-G-Frankfurt/dp/0691122946/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/104-9998681-1324759?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1182109609&sr=1-1

An unexpectedly scholarly read.

Best,

Michael

ColoradoGuy
06-18-2007, 12:11 AM
Oooh, I gotta go get that one. I'm surrounded by it every working day.

LaceWing
11-26-2007, 01:02 PM
After reading this abstract, I'm looking forward to reading Robert Storey:
http://cogweb.ucla.edu/Abstracts/Carroll_S98.html

It was Storey's "Science Friction" that inspired me to google around.
http://www.reason.com/news/show/29589.html

Homewrecker
11-29-2007, 01:40 AM
I just recently read "Metaphors We Live By" by Lakoff and am struggling through Wittengenstein's "Philosophical Investigations."

The listing for Victorian Sensation rang my bell. Gonna have to grab a copy of that.

Thanks for the links.

ColoradoGuy
11-29-2007, 03:39 AM
Welcome to AW and our little corner of it. Robeiae is our resident Wittgenstein groupie, and most mentions of the name will draw him from his usual lair over in Office Party and Politics and Current Events.

In my crude understanding of these things, for Wittgenstein it was all about language, and most philosophical discussions were actually linguistic ones. So we can only think about things we can talk about. I see his point, but the mystic in me doesn't like it much.

Homewrecker
11-29-2007, 05:15 AM
Oooooo that sounds great. I'm relatively new to linguistic & phil of lang and don't feel very conversant in it yet. I will have to be tho' as part of my thesis will involve metaphor analysis. That being said, I'll probably be lurking here alot.

robeiae
11-29-2007, 06:31 AM
Welcome to AW and our little corner of it. Robeiae is our resident Wittgenstein groupie, and most mentions of the name will draw him from his usual lair over in Office Party and Politics and Current Events.Old Chinese curse: may you always get what you ask for...


In my crude understanding of these things, for Wittgenstein it was all about language, and most philosophical discussions were actually linguistic ones. So we can only think about things we can talk about. I see his point, but the mystic in me doesn't like it much.
A good book to get started with Wittgenstein is this one:
Wittgenstein's Poker (http://www.amazon.com/Wittgensteins-Poker-Ten-Minute-Argument-Philosophers/dp/0066212448)

It's a story about an argument between Karl Popper and Wittgenstein. The substance of that argument--more than anything else, imo--is why Wittgenstein infuriates so many and appeals to so many.

Welcome, Homewrecker.

benbradley
11-29-2007, 09:51 AM
Firstly I've got two book titles to contribute to the thread (links to Amazon with reviews and such):

The Mind's I: Fantasies and Reflections on Self & Soul by Douglas R. Hofstadter and Daniel C. Dennett (http://www.amazon.com/Minds-I-Fantasies-Reflections-Self/dp/0465030912)
I found this whole book rather mind-blowing. Perhaps most applicable to this forum were the stories about robots - it's been a while since I read it, but one story describes a robot (not an android, but a mechanism moving on the floor like a Roomba) as if it were a living thing, and (I vagely recall that) another describes living things as "mere machines." The writing was effective at manipulating one's emotions enough that I can't give it a proper description here. This was influential for me many years ago when it was first published - I really need to reread it.

How Real Is Real? by Paul Watzlawick (http://www.amazon.com/How-Real-Paul-Watzlawick/dp/0394722566)
This was a bit mind-blowing too (I read it more recently), but what I mostly liked was the first half of the book - the second half seemed to be going a bit afield of whatever the first half was about.

Also today I reread this thread:
"Privileged language, Register, and Humor (split from "A Little Support" in TIO)"
http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=82442
and I recall that there was a long thread started by Shweta from several years ago which was an informal but academic discussion of "language theory" or some such. Does anyone know what I'm talking about, and where that thread is? I read most of it here on AW earlier this year (there was a more recent thread that had a link to it), I hope it's not gone. That thread was a bit like a book itself.

In the above "Priveleged Language" thread, someone mentions that the words (epithets) are loaded , and that brings to mind a whole separate topic about which I'll start a new thread. Meanwhile, keep the book titles coming...

Homewrecker
11-29-2007, 11:11 PM
Old Chinese curse: may you always get what you ask for...


A good book to get started with Wittgenstein is this one:
Wittgenstein's Poker (http://www.amazon.com/Wittgensteins-Poker-Ten-Minute-Argument-Philosophers/dp/0066212448)


Thank you. I will give it a looksie.

^^

LaceWing
12-14-2007, 09:13 AM
Introducing Postmodernism, Totem Books, ISBN 1-874166-21-8

Better than mostly just talking about it, this book demonstrates its subject as well. It got me oriented to the topic.


From the back cover --


What is postmodernism? As we enter the 21st century, here is a graphic guide to the maddeningly enigmatic concept used to define our cultural condition.

Post modernism claims that "modernity", which grew from the Enlightenment, the Industrial Revolution and Marxism, has collapsed. We now live in an endlessly "contemporary" culture full of contested meanings, parody, pastiche and cultural cross-over. This is a virtual world of "hyperreality" containing such strange phenomena as post Holocaust amnesia, Disneyland, cyberspace and Fukuyama's proclaimed "end of history".

Introducing Postmodernism, written by Richard Appignanesi and illustrated by Chris Garret, traces the pedigrees of postmodernism in art, theory and history, and takes us on a roller-coaster ride through structuralism, semiotics and deconstruction in the company of postmodern icons such as Foucault, Levi-Strauss, Barthes, Derrida, Lacan and Lyotard. It is a crucial guide for anyone fascinated or exasperated by the hall of mirrors that is postmodernism.

dgiharris
05-07-2008, 06:05 AM
I loved Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse. Was an interesting perspective on attaining enlightment.

That coupled with Robert Heinlein's Stranger in a Strange Land and I think you will have an interesting take on life the universe and everything :)

Mel...

Jt/Js
06-24-2008, 08:50 PM
Okay, just to put my two cents in...

Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig

I've found it fascinating and it's definitely one of my favorite books. It's classified as a book on philosophy because it explores the use of logic in day-to-day life, the objective versus subjective, and the unifying element referred to as "Quality," which gives "meaning" to the decisions (both conscious and subconscious) we make. It just really makes you THINK. But I would suggest reading it a couple chapters at a time to digest it properly, instead of trying to read it all in one go.

Alrighty then, my two cents are in...oh dang now I don't have enough for the vending machine! ^_^

Popo Agie Flow
10-20-2008, 08:31 PM
Here's another a little out of the norm, nonetheless worthy.

Meditations on Hunting, Jose' Ortega y Gasset, Wilderness Adventures Press, Bozeman, MT, 1995

Gasset used hunting as a way to weave the act of being human throughout his thoughts. Genius.

sunandshadow
05-18-2009, 01:10 AM
Interesting book I just read, The Midnight Disease by Alice W. Flaherty. About the drive to write, writer's block, hypergraphia, temporal lobe epilepsy, and bipolar disorder.

dhriti
12-23-2009, 09:07 AM
If anyone is interested in Lacan, then please go through the book "How to read Lacan" by Slavoj Zizek. Excellent book for the beginners

writeontime
10-11-2012, 03:16 PM
This is a good list - I've added a couple to my TBR list already. Thanks.

If I may, I'd also like to add Gayatri Spivak's A Critique of Postcolonial Reason and Derrida's Specters of Marx.

names
11-23-2012, 05:44 AM
Interesting book I just read, The Midnight Disease by Alice W. Flaherty. About the drive to write, writer's block, hypergraphia, temporal lobe epilepsy, and bipolar disorder.
Anyone else read this book?

spamwarrior
06-21-2013, 07:44 AM
For a short, readable and not too jargon-laden introduction to literary /critical theory:

Eagleton, Terry. Literary Theory: An Introduction. University of Minnesota Press; 2nd edition (November 1996).

I read this last summer before applying to graduate schools. I liked it! Eagleton's hilarious (and I mean that in the best way possible).

For my recommendation, I recommend Unsuspected Eloquence by James Anderson Winn. It's a pretty detailed and well-researched book about the relations between poetry and music.

ewynne
06-30-2018, 11:51 PM
It's not so much theory, but if you want a guide to analyzing the authorial intent written into a work, I highly suggest How to Read Literature Like a Professor by Thomas C. Foster. I was assigned it in AP English in high school. Went on to major in English and Creative Writing, but even so, I think that book had a greater impact on how I interpret literature than any other. And of course, how I read has a big effect on how I write.

DMcCunney
01-23-2019, 12:12 AM
For pure literary criticism theory, the place I start is the late Northrop Frye's "The Anatomy of Criticism". As Frye explained it:
"THIS book forced itself on me while I was trying to write something else, and it probably still bears the marks of the reluctance with which a great part of it was composed. After completing a study of William Blake (Fearful Symmetry, 1947), I determined to apply the principles of literary symbolism and Biblical typology which I had learned from Blake to another poet, preferably one who had taken these principles from the critical theories of his own day, instead of working them out by himself as Blake did. I therefore began a study of Spenser’s Faerie Queene, only to discover that in my beginning was my end. The introduction to Spenser became an introduction to the theory of allegory, and that theory obstinately adhered to a much larger theoretical structure. The basis of argument became more and more discursive, and less and less historical and Spenserian. I soon found myself entangled in those parts of criticism that have to do with such words as “myth,” “symbol,” “ritual,” and “archetype,” and my efforts to make sense of these words in various published articles met with enough interest to encourage me to proceed further along these lines. Eventually the theoretical and the practical aspects of the task I had begun completely separated. What is here offered is pure critical theory, and the omission of all specific criticism, even, in three of the four essays, of quotation, is deliberate. The present book seems to me, so far as I can judge at present, to need a complementary volume concerned with practical criticism, a sort of morphology of literary symbolism."

In the process, Frye gropes with such issues as the fact that is no term in English for a general work of prose fiction. He also talks about poetry, but makes clear his canvas is broader, and he uses various terms simply because a vocabulary for poetics exists, but one for prose largely doesn't.

For those who want to sample, there's a decently formatted HTML version taken from an Internet Archive scan up at http://northropfrye-theanatomyofcriticism.blogspot.com/ For an actual published copy, Princeton University Press has it available in paper and electronic form: https://press.princeton.edu/titles/7013.html

Frye's work made me reconsider how I thought about and analyzed literature.
______
Dennis